Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Carbon research with global impact

08.02.2008
A research centre dedicated to reducing the planet’s carbon footprint will be launched at The University of Nottingham this week.

The £1.1m Centre for Innovation in Carbon Capture and Storage (CICCS) will explore cutting edge technology that ‘captures’ polluting carbon dioxide and stores it permanently — preventing its damaging release into the atmosphere.

CO2 and other greenhouse gases are the main contributors to global warming and climate change. By investigating new technologies that will store the gases safely and efficiently, the research can help to reduce their impact on the planet’s climate and eco-systems.

From governments and environmental pressure groups to oil producers and energy-intensive industry, research taking place at the centre will have a potentially global impact.

Experts in clean energy technologies and carbon capture will speak at the launch event, which takes place on Friday February 8. Keynote speakers include Lord Ronald Oxburgh, President of the Carbon Capture and Storage Association, Dr David Clarke, Director of the Energy Technologies Institute, Martin Maseo, Technical Director of the Energy Institute and Dr Keith Burnard, Chief Technical Consultant of AEA Energy and Environment. MP Nick Palmer, Parliamentary Private Secretary to Energy Minister Malcolm Wicks, will welcome guests at the event on his behalf.

The centre will be led by Professor Mercedes Maroto-Valer, of the University’s School of Chemical and Environmental Engineering. But the research will be cross-disciplinary, bringing together engineers, mathematicians, bioscientists, geographers and geologists.

Research projects conducted in the centre will include the storage and conversion of CO2 into materials and fuels.

The Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) will fund the centre over the next five years through its Challenging Engineering initiative.

Prof Maroto-Valer, Director of the Centre for Innovation in Carbon Capture and Storage, said: “We are excited about the prospects for CICCS to become a world leader in the field. We will continue to develop new processes that will make a significant impact in finding solutions for climate change and protecting the planet.

“We will present the research, training and outreach activities planned by CICCS at the launch event. The response to the centre has been outstanding so far.”

Dr Nick Palmer MP added: "I'm delighted to help launch the centre, as its technology may well be crucial to Britain's future. Britain has huge coal reserves, which could have a greatly enhanced future to guarantee our energy security if carbon capture technology were more advanced."

The official opening of the Centre for Innovation in Carbon Capture and Storage will take place on Friday February 8 at University Park. For more information on the centre visit www.nottingham.ac.uk/carbonmanagement

Emma Thorne | alfa
Further information:
http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/carbonmanagement

More articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation:

nachricht Successful calculation of human and natural influence on cloud formation
04.11.2016 | Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main

nachricht Invasive Insects Cost the World Billions Per Year
04.10.2016 | University of Adelaide

All articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Significantly more productivity in USP lasers

In recent years, lasers with ultrashort pulses (USP) down to the femtosecond range have become established on an industrial scale. They could advance some applications with the much-lauded “cold ablation” – if that meant they would then achieve more throughput. A new generation of process engineering that will address this issue in particular will be discussed at the “4th UKP Workshop – Ultrafast Laser Technology” in April 2017.

Even back in the 1990s, scientists were comparing materials processing with nanosecond, picosecond and femtosesecond pulses. The result was surprising:...

Im Focus: Shape matters when light meets atom

Mapping the interaction of a single atom with a single photon may inform design of quantum devices

Have you ever wondered how you see the world? Vision is about photons of light, which are packets of energy, interacting with the atoms or molecules in what...

Im Focus: Novel silicon etching technique crafts 3-D gradient refractive index micro-optics

A multi-institutional research collaboration has created a novel approach for fabricating three-dimensional micro-optics through the shape-defined formation of porous silicon (PSi), with broad impacts in integrated optoelectronics, imaging, and photovoltaics.

Working with colleagues at Stanford and The Dow Chemical Company, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign fabricated 3-D birefringent...

Im Focus: Quantum Particles Form Droplets

In experiments with magnetic atoms conducted at extremely low temperatures, scientists have demonstrated a unique phase of matter: The atoms form a new type of quantum liquid or quantum droplet state. These so called quantum droplets may preserve their form in absence of external confinement because of quantum effects. The joint team of experimental physicists from Innsbruck and theoretical physicists from Hannover report on their findings in the journal Physical Review X.

“Our Quantum droplets are in the gas phase but they still drop like a rock,” explains experimental physicist Francesca Ferlaino when talking about the...

Im Focus: MADMAX: Max Planck Institute for Physics takes up axion research

The Max Planck Institute for Physics (MPP) is opening up a new research field. A workshop from November 21 - 22, 2016 will mark the start of activities for an innovative axion experiment. Axions are still only purely hypothetical particles. Their detection could solve two fundamental problems in particle physics: What dark matter consists of and why it has not yet been possible to directly observe a CP violation for the strong interaction.

The “MADMAX” project is the MPP’s commitment to axion research. Axions are so far only a theoretical prediction and are difficult to detect: on the one hand,...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

ICTM Conference 2017: Production technology for turbomachine manufacturing of the future

16.11.2016 | Event News

Innovation Day Laser Technology – Laser Additive Manufacturing

01.11.2016 | Event News

#IC2S2: When Social Science meets Computer Science - GESIS will host the IC2S2 conference 2017

14.10.2016 | Event News

 
Latest News

Closing the carbon loop

08.12.2016 | Life Sciences

Applicability of dynamic facilitation theory to binary hard disk systems

08.12.2016 | Physics and Astronomy

Scientists track chemical and structural evolution of catalytic nanoparticles in 3-D

08.12.2016 | Materials Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>