Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Mobile Oceanographic Data Collection and Animal Tracking Platform Launched

26.06.2012
A Wave Glider unmanned maritime vehicle (UMV) has been deployed by Ocean Tracking Network (OTN) researchers in the Gulf of St. Lawrence to test mobile collection and remote offloading of marine animal tracking information.

Deployed from Stephenville, N.L., Canada on June 19, the Wave Glider will travel in the area of the Strait of Belle Isle and the Cabot Strait over a 30-day period before reaching its final waypoint at the northern tip of Cape Breton Island.

The Wave Glider, built by U.S. based Liquid Robotics, harvests energy from wave motion and solar panels to generate thrust at the ocean's surface. Piloted by the Liquid Robotics team, the Glider carries a VEMCO acoustic receiver to collect detections of tagged fish within 800m. Of particular interest on this trip are detections of Atlantic salmon tagged by the Atlantic Salmon Federation.

Mobile receivers greatly expand the range of animal detections contributing to more comprehensive records of animal movement, migration and survival. In the future, Gliders will be able to upload data from fixed receiver stations eliminating the need to hire costly ships for data retrieval by OTN researchers. This mission is testing the ability of a mobile receiver and will not collect data from bottom moored receivers.

“These things have excellent station keep capabilities. You can take a Wave Glider and literally park it over a [receiver]. On this mission it’ll be moving all the time, but if we want to use it in the future to upload receivers, you would just tell it, ‘go here,’ and it would stay there for however long it takes to upload the data. If there’s a problem and it takes two or three days to upload the data, the glider doesn’t care. The whole time it’s uploading [data], it can be sending it to you via satellite. When it’s done with that one, it just moves on to the next one.” – Richard Davis, Technical Director for the Dalhousie Glider Group

Researchers are also collecting ocean surface parameters as a context for animal movement and migration.

“The scientific community has little oceanographic data available in general for the location of the mission at this time of year for use in developing models of the oceanography and currents in the Gulf. The models are important for weather prediction, search and rescue activities, understanding the drivers of the ecosystem, and for environmental responses to events like oil spills.” – Dr. Fred Whoriskey, Executive Director of OTN

OTN is a $168-million research and technology development project headquartered at Dalhousie University. Starting in 2008, OTN began deploying Canadian state of the art acoustic receivers and oceanographic monitoring equipment in key ocean locations. These are being used to document the movements and survival of marine animals carrying acoustic tags and to document how both are influenced by oceanographic conditions. OTN is funded by the Canada Foundation for Innovation and the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada.

Nikki Beauchamp
Public Relations, Ocean Tracking Network
Dalhousie University
1355 Oxford Street
PO Box 15000
Halifax, Nova Scotia
B3H 4R2 Canada
Phone: 902.293.0181
FAX: 902.494.3736
email: n.beauchamp@dal.ca
http://oceantrackingnetwork.org/
http://canada.oceantrack.org/

Nikki Beauchamp | Newswise Science News
Further information:
http://www.dal.ca
http://oceantrackingnetwork.org/
http://canada.oceantrack.org/

More articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation:

nachricht Preservation of floodplains is flood protection
27.09.2017 | Technische Universität München

nachricht Conservationists are sounding the alarm: parrots much more threatened than assumed
15.09.2017 | Justus-Liebig-Universität Gießen

All articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Salmonella as a tumour medication

HZI researchers developed a bacterial strain that can be used in cancer therapy

Salmonellae are dangerous pathogens that enter the body via contaminated food and can cause severe infections. But these bacteria are also known to target...

Im Focus: Neutron star merger directly observed for the first time

University of Maryland researchers contribute to historic detection of gravitational waves and light created by event

On August 17, 2017, at 12:41:04 UTC, scientists made the first direct observation of a merger between two neutron stars--the dense, collapsed cores that remain...

Im Focus: Breaking: the first light from two neutron stars merging

Seven new papers describe the first-ever detection of light from a gravitational wave source. The event, caused by two neutron stars colliding and merging together, was dubbed GW170817 because it sent ripples through space-time that reached Earth on 2017 August 17. Around the world, hundreds of excited astronomers mobilized quickly and were able to observe the event using numerous telescopes, providing a wealth of new data.

Previous detections of gravitational waves have all involved the merger of two black holes, a feat that won the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physics earlier this month....

Im Focus: Smart sensors for efficient processes

Material defects in end products can quickly result in failures in many areas of industry, and have a massive impact on the safe use of their products. This is why, in the field of quality assurance, intelligent, nondestructive sensor systems play a key role. They allow testing components and parts in a rapid and cost-efficient manner without destroying the actual product or changing its surface. Experts from the Fraunhofer IZFP in Saarbrücken will be presenting two exhibits at the Blechexpo in Stuttgart from 7–10 November 2017 that allow fast, reliable, and automated characterization of materials and detection of defects (Hall 5, Booth 5306).

When quality testing uses time-consuming destructive test methods, it can result in enormous costs due to damaging or destroying the products. And given that...

Im Focus: Cold molecules on collision course

Using a new cooling technique MPQ scientists succeed at observing collisions in a dense beam of cold and slow dipolar molecules.

How do chemical reactions proceed at extremely low temperatures? The answer requires the investigation of molecular samples that are cold, dense, and slow at...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

3rd Symposium on Driving Simulation

23.10.2017 | Event News

ASEAN Member States discuss the future role of renewable energy

17.10.2017 | Event News

World Health Summit 2017: International experts set the course for the future of Global Health

10.10.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Shrews shrink in winter and regrow in spring

24.10.2017 | Life Sciences

Microfluidics probe 'cholesterol' of the oil industry

23.10.2017 | Life Sciences

Gamma rays will reach beyond the limits of light

23.10.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>