Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

An “Eye” that Measures Liquid Steel Temperatures

22.08.2011
Contact-free measurement of the temperature of molten steel boosts the productivity of arc furnaces.

That’s why Siemens has developed a system called Simetal RCB Temp, which consists of an optical sensor that can determine the temperature of the molten metal in the steel production process (over 1,500 degrees Celsius) at shorter intervals than was previously the case. As a result, the best time to tap can be determined more exactly, thus saving time and energy and increasing work safety.


To produce steel in electric arc furnaces, scrap metal is melted down in a process that requires the temperature of the molten metal to be exactly and reliably measured. RCB Temp makes optimum melting sequence times possible, resulting in lower energy consumption and operating costs. Previously, the temperature had to be measured with measurement cartridges through the open slag door, because optical measurement systems are too sensitive to heat and soiling to be installed inside the furnaces. Manual measurements are strenuous, hazardous, and limit the number of measurements that can be taken until the steel is tapped. Siemens Industry has now successfully integrated the RCB (Refining Combined Burner) system into a robust optical temperature sensor.

The RCB system consists of a burner for melting the scrap metal and a lance for injecting a precisely concentrated stream of oxygen into the liquid steel. In order to measure the temperature, an inert gas is injected into the steel instead of oxygen. The gas stream enables the system to “look” into the molten metal like an eye, allowing the optical sensor at the rear of the lance to detect the liquid steel’s infrared radiation. The resulting data is used to calculate the temperature of the molten metal with the help of a special algorithm. The system doesn’t require measurement cartridges and can measure temperatures through a closed slag door and when heating power is on. And because the sensor is positioned at the rear of the lance, it is protected against damage when scrap iron is fed into the furnace.

Arc furnaces can easily be retrofitted with Simetal RCB Temp when they are shut down for maintenance. The system can increase productivity by up to two percent so that the investment is recouped in less than six months.

Dr. Norbert Aschenbrenner | Siemens InnovationNews
Further information:
http://www.siemens.com/innovationnews

More articles from Power and Electrical Engineering:

nachricht Heavy metals in water meet their match
28.07.2017 | Swansea University

nachricht Did you know that infrared heat and UV light contribute to the success of your barbecue?
27.07.2017 | Heraeus Noblelight GmbH

All articles from Power and Electrical Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Abrupt motion sharpens x-ray pulses

Spectrally narrow x-ray pulses may be “sharpened” by purely mechanical means. This sounds surprisingly, but a team of theoretical and experimental physicists developed and realized such a method. It is based on fast motions, precisely synchronized with the pulses, of a target interacting with the x-ray light. Thereby, photons are redistributed within the x-ray pulse to the desired spectral region.

A team of theoretical physicists from the MPI for Nuclear Physics (MPIK) in Heidelberg has developed a novel method to intensify the spectrally broad x-ray...

Im Focus: Physicists Design Ultrafocused Pulses

Physicists working with researcher Oriol Romero-Isart devised a new simple scheme to theoretically generate arbitrarily short and focused electromagnetic fields. This new tool could be used for precise sensing and in microscopy.

Microwaves, heat radiation, light and X-radiation are examples for electromagnetic waves. Many applications require to focus the electromagnetic fields to...

Im Focus: Carbon Nanotubes Turn Electrical Current into Light-emitting Quasi-particles

Strong light-matter coupling in these semiconducting tubes may hold the key to electrically pumped lasers

Light-matter quasi-particles can be generated electrically in semiconducting carbon nanotubes. Material scientists and physicists from Heidelberg University...

Im Focus: Flexible proximity sensor creates smart surfaces

Fraunhofer IPA has developed a proximity sensor made from silicone and carbon nanotubes (CNT) which detects objects and determines their position. The materials and printing process used mean that the sensor is extremely flexible, economical and can be used for large surfaces. Industry and research partners can use and further develop this innovation straight away.

At first glance, the proximity sensor appears to be nothing special: a thin, elastic layer of silicone onto which black square surfaces are printed, but these...

Im Focus: 3-D scanning with water

3-D shape acquisition using water displacement as the shape sensor for the reconstruction of complex objects

A global team of computer scientists and engineers have developed an innovative technique that more completely reconstructs challenging 3D objects. An ancient...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Clash of Realities 2017: Registration now open. International Conference at TH Köln

26.07.2017 | Event News

Closing the Sustainability Circle: Protection of Food with Biobased Materials

21.07.2017 | Event News

»We are bringing Additive Manufacturing to SMEs«

19.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

New 3-D imaging reveals how human cell nucleus organizes DNA and chromatin of its genome

28.07.2017 | Health and Medicine

Heavy metals in water meet their match

28.07.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Oestrogen regulates pathological changes of bones via bone lining cells

28.07.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>