Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Directors challenged to create pocket sized films for mobiles

27.07.2004


Before long, the majority of mobile phones will have the capacity to show short films. If you want to be one of the pioneering filmmakers to make their mark in this new genre then Pocket Shorts, a new initiative supported by NESTA (the National Endowment for Science, Technology and the Arts), the organisation that supports UK creativity and innovation, could be for you.



Pocket Shorts is a supportive environment, offering both generic filmmaking and technology training, while financially supporting the production of a short, or series of short films.

Filmmakers can apply for up to £2,000 in funding to create innovative short films in a new genre that is viewable on mobile phones and distributed via Bluetooth, WAP and Multimedia Messages (MMS).


Pocket Shorts is aimed at filmmakers who have graduated in the last five years, and now live in Yorkshire and Humberside, the North West and the North East. It is a partnership between NESTA and Short Circuits, who screen and commission short films, with Oyster Partners and Carbon Based Games as technology partners.

The initiative will develop this new distribution channel that will allow audiences to download the final films online for free or send it to other phones via MMS or Bluetooth. This will in turn create a new business model by providing a space for companies to emerge and promote their work to a global audience.

Pocket Shorts is an extension of NESTA’s Creative Pioneer Programme, which is designed to encourage the growth of a new generation of creative entrepreneurs. It will award up to eight individuals funding of up to £2,000, training sessions in filmmaking and the technology being used and an individual industry professional mentor. At the end of each project awardees will have produced one 1 minute long film (downloadable only from a WAP site) or four 15 second long films (which can sent from phones as well as downloaded).

The winners will be showcased at key UK film festivals in 2005.

For more information, and details on how to apply, go to www.pocketshorts.com. The deadline for applications is 5.30pm Friday 29 October 2004.

Prior to applying, interested filmmakers can find out more at workshops to be held in each of the three regions. Here, filmmakers can come and see examples of short moving image work, a demonstration of video phones, and find out about the distribution channels for the finished films.

Hugo Manassei, Director of the Creative Pioneer Programme at NESTA, said: ”Why follow the traditional routes and work as a runner for a film company or fight tooth and nail to promote your work independently at film festivals when Pocket Shorts offers an alternative? You could be one of the first pioneering filmmakers to work in a new genre that will continue to grow as fast as the accompanying mobile phone technology does. The support and training offered by Short Circuits as well as the provision of a mentor will also give you new methods of producing and promoting your films and let you develop your creativity.”

Joseph Meaney | alfa
Further information:
http://www.nesta.org.uk

More articles from Communications Media:

nachricht On patrol in social networks
25.01.2017 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Arbeitswirtschaft und Organisation IAO

nachricht Tile Based DASH Streaming for Virtual Reality with HEVC from Fraunhofer HHI
03.01.2017 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Nachrichtentechnik Heinrich-Hertz-Institut

All articles from Communications Media >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Giant Magnetic Fields in the Universe

Astronomers from Bonn and Tautenburg in Thuringia (Germany) used the 100-m radio telescope at Effelsberg to observe several galaxy clusters. At the edges of these large accumulations of dark matter, stellar systems (galaxies), hot gas, and charged particles, they found magnetic fields that are exceptionally ordered over distances of many million light years. This makes them the most extended magnetic fields in the universe known so far.

The results will be published on March 22 in the journal „Astronomy & Astrophysics“.

Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound structures in the universe. With a typical extent of about 10 million light years, i.e. 100 times the...

Im Focus: Tracing down linear ubiquitination

Researchers at the Goethe University Frankfurt, together with partners from the University of Tübingen in Germany and Queen Mary University as well as Francis Crick Institute from London (UK) have developed a novel technology to decipher the secret ubiquitin code.

Ubiquitin is a small protein that can be linked to other cellular proteins, thereby controlling and modulating their functions. The attachment occurs in many...

Im Focus: Perovskite edges can be tuned for optoelectronic performance

Layered 2D material improves efficiency for solar cells and LEDs

In the eternal search for next generation high-efficiency solar cells and LEDs, scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory and their partners are creating...

Im Focus: Polymer-coated silicon nanosheets as alternative to graphene: A perfect team for nanoelectronics

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are less stable. Now researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have, for the first time ever, produced a composite material combining silicon nanosheets and a polymer that is both UV-resistant and easy to process. This brings the scientists a significant step closer to industrial applications like flexible displays and photosensors.

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are...

Im Focus: Researchers Imitate Molecular Crowding in Cells

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to simulate these confined natural conditions in artificial vesicles for the first time. As reported in the academic journal Small, the results are offering better insight into the development of nanoreactors and artificial organelles.

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

International Land Use Symposium ILUS 2017: Call for Abstracts and Registration open

20.03.2017 | Event News

CONNECT 2017: International congress on connective tissue

14.03.2017 | Event News

ICTM Conference: Turbine Construction between Big Data and Additive Manufacturing

07.03.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Pulverizing electronic waste is green, clean -- and cold

22.03.2017 | Materials Sciences

Astronomers hazard a ride in a 'drifting carousel' to understand pulsating stars

22.03.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

New gel-like coating beefs up the performance of lithium-sulfur batteries

22.03.2017 | Materials Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>