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Winners of "CINF-FIZ Scholarship for Scientific Excellence" 2010 were announced

23.08.2010
FIZ CHEMIE and CINF announced the winners of "CINF- FIZ Scholarship for Scientific Excellence"/ All prizes were awarded to scientists doing research at American universities / The scholarship awards outstanding contributions to the development of Computer-supported chemical information sciences

Rima Hajjo, Qian Zhu and Hao Tang were granted this year's "CINF-FIZ Scholarship for Scientific Excellence". The German-American sponsored prize jointly awarded by FIZ CHEMIE and CINF, the Division of Chemical Information of the American Chemical Society (ACS), honors considerable contributions of graduate and postdoctoral students to the development of computer-supported chemical information sciences. The award is designed to advance computer-aided preparation and the use of chemical knowledge as well as to foster students’ involvement in CINF.

This year’s winners of the German-American sponsored “CINF-FIZ Scholarship for Scientific Excellence” were announced during the 240th National Meeting of the American Chemical Society in Boston, MA, USA. The winners presented their research work in a scientific poster session during the Welcoming Reception of the CINF on Sunday evening.

Details about the winners:

Rima Hajjo
Laboratory for Molecular Modeling, Division of Medicinal Chemistry and Natural Products, School of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7360
With: "A Chemocentric Informatics Approach to Drug Discovery: An Application to the Identification and Experimental Validation of Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulators as Serotonin Receptor Subtype 6 Binders and Potential Anti-Alzheimer's Agents".
Rima Hajjo’s work was supported by her colleagues and co-authors Simon Wang, Bryan Roth and Alexander Tropsha

http://pharmacy.unc.edu/divisions/mcnp/students-and-fellows/graduate-students

Dr. Qian Zhu
School of Informatics and Computing, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN
With: „Using Aggregative Web Services for Drug Discovery”
The work was compiled in cooperation with Michael S. Lajiness and David Wild.
http://cheminfo.informatics.indiana.edu/people.html
Hao Tang
Laboratory for Molecular Modeling, Division of Medicinal Chemistry and Natural Products, School of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 and Molecular & Cellular Biophysics Program, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, School of Medicine, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599
With: Quantitative Structure Activity Relationship (QSAR) Analysis of US EPA Toxicity Reference Database (ToxRefDB): Toxicity Models help Prioritizing Compounds for Future Toxicity Testing
Hao Tang’s co-authors were Hao Zhu, Liying Zhang, Alexander Sedykh, Ann Richard, Ivan Rusyn, and Alexander Tropsha.

http://www.med.unc.edu/biochem/people/students?searchterm=Hao+Tang

For additional Information
CINF: http://www.acsinf.org
FIZ CHEMIE: http://www.chemistry.de
FIZ CHEMIE
P.O. BOX 12 03 37
10593 Berlin, Germany
www.chemistry.de
E-mail: info@fiz-chemie.de
Richard Huber
Phone: +49 (0)30 / 39977-217
E-mail: huber@fiz-chemie.de
About FIZ CHEMIE
FIZ CHEMIE is a non-profit organization supported by the German federal and state governments with the primary task of providing those in science, education and industry with high-quality information services for general chemistry, chemical technology and related fields. The organization is certified according to the DIN EN ISO 9001:2008 quality standard. FIZ CHEMIE maintains relationships with research and information institutes in Germany and abroad and has marketing agreements with partner organizations around the world. The technical information center is committed to the advancement and integration of technical information for chemistry at national and international levels. FIZ CHEMIE is an institute for the scientific infrastructure in the Leibniz Scientific Community (Leibnizgemeinschaft WGL)

All statements in this press release which are not of a historical character refer to the future in the sense of U.S. security law. The predictive statements are assumptions which are based on the current state of information and consequently are subject to particular uncertainty factors. Events which actually occur can deviate considerably from those predicted due to many factors, for example as a result of changes in technology, product development or production, market acceptance, costs or prices for products of FIZ CHEMIE and dependence on alliances and partners, approval processes, competition, intellectual property or patent protection and copyrights.

Vanessa Vogt-Herrmann | idw
Further information:
http://www.chemistry.de

Further reports about: Biophysics CHEMISTRY CINF Chemical Drug Delivery FIZ Molecular Target Scholarship toxicity

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