Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Research paves way for safer cars

02.09.2005


Anticollision systems will be the next step on the way to even safer cars. Researchers in Trondheim are helping the automotive industry to turn plans into reality.



Modern vehicles contain a large number of built-in computers. The project aims to develop software for use both in anticollision systems and in systems designed to prevent car from turning over. In both systems the vehicle itself takes command when it is physically impossible for the driver himself to react sufficiently rapidly and appropriately.

A number of modern cars are already fitted with anti-skid systems - technology that corrects the course of the car even before it loses its grip on the road. Some cars are also fitted with anti-rollover systems. These systems obtain their information from sensors that measure acceleration, how far the steering wheel has been turned and how fast each of the wheels is turning.


The scientists from Trondheim are developing a system that performs further, extremely rapid, processing on the data from these sensors.

The system being developed by the Norwegian scientists uses information from the sensors to calculate the forward and lateral speeds of the vehicle, as well as the extent and speed of any roll. These are measures that the car’s own computer needs to have if it is to avoid collisions and rollovers.

-There are two aspects that distinguish our solution from existing systems, says Lars Imsland from the SINTEF Group. -We have mathematically demonstrated that the estimated velocity is correct. At the same time, our solution does not require a great deal of computing power, which means that safer cars need not be too expensive.

The core of an anticollision system will consist of a camera and radar that warn the vehicle of imminent danger. Messages will be sent from several integrated computers to tell each of the wheels how much they need to brake. For these messages be correct, the car must know its own speeds both forwards and sideways, which is where the Norwegian contribution comes in.

-Daimler is so interested in the results of our project that we will soon have permission to install the first version of the system in Mercedes test vehicles, which should be very interesting”.

Imsland and four fellow scientists make up the SINTEF/NTNU team in an EU research project in which the Mercedes parent company Daimler Chrysler is the industrial partner

Lars Imsland | alfa
Further information:
http://www.sintef.no/default____490.aspx

More articles from Automotive Engineering:

nachricht 3D scans for the automotive industry
16.01.2017 | Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg

nachricht Improvement of the operating range and increasing of the reliability of integrated circuits
09.11.2016 | Technologie Lizenz-Büro (TLB) der Baden-Württembergischen Hochschulen GmbH

All articles from Automotive Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Wafer-thin Magnetic Materials Developed for Future Quantum Technologies

Two-dimensional magnetic structures are regarded as a promising material for new types of data storage, since the magnetic properties of individual molecular building blocks can be investigated and modified. For the first time, researchers have now produced a wafer-thin ferrimagnet, in which molecules with different magnetic centers arrange themselves on a gold surface to form a checkerboard pattern. Scientists at the Swiss Nanoscience Institute at the University of Basel and the Paul Scherrer Institute published their findings in the journal Nature Communications.

Ferrimagnets are composed of two centers which are magnetized at different strengths and point in opposing directions. Two-dimensional, quasi-flat ferrimagnets...

Im Focus: World's thinnest hologram paves path to new 3-D world

Nano-hologram paves way for integration of 3-D holography into everyday electronics

An Australian-Chinese research team has created the world's thinnest hologram, paving the way towards the integration of 3D holography into everyday...

Im Focus: Using graphene to create quantum bits

In the race to produce a quantum computer, a number of projects are seeking a way to create quantum bits -- or qubits -- that are stable, meaning they are not much affected by changes in their environment. This normally needs highly nonlinear non-dissipative elements capable of functioning at very low temperatures.

In pursuit of this goal, researchers at EPFL's Laboratory of Photonics and Quantum Measurements LPQM (STI/SB), have investigated a nonlinear graphene-based...

Im Focus: Bacteria harness the lotus effect to protect themselves

Biofilms: Researchers find the causes of water-repelling properties

Dental plaque and the viscous brown slime in drainpipes are two familiar examples of bacterial biofilms. Removing such bacterial depositions from surfaces is...

Im Focus: Hydrogen Bonds Directly Detected for the First Time

For the first time, scientists have succeeded in studying the strength of hydrogen bonds in a single molecule using an atomic force microscope. Researchers from the University of Basel’s Swiss Nanoscience Institute network have reported the results in the journal Science Advances.

Hydrogen is the most common element in the universe and is an integral part of almost all organic compounds. Molecules and sections of macromolecules are...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Dortmund MST Conference presents Individualized Healthcare Solutions with micro and nanotechnology

22.05.2017 | Event News

Innovation 4.0: Shaping a humane fourth industrial revolution

17.05.2017 | Event News

Media accreditation opens for historic year at European Health Forum Gastein

16.05.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

New approach to revolutionize the production of molecular hydrogen

22.05.2017 | Materials Sciences

Scientists enlist engineered protein to battle the MERS virus

22.05.2017 | Life Sciences

Experts explain origins of topographic relief on Earth, Mars and Titan

22.05.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>