Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Rising to the task of better car safety

30.06.2005


With cars become ever more computerised, there is an increasing need for robust real-time embedded software to maintain the effectiveness and safety of critical onboard systems.



The IST-funded RISE project, which ended in February 2005, set out to address this demand by developing a software toolset specifically geared to the automotive industry.

RISE succeeded in delivering on all of its principal objectives and answers a genuine need in the automotive industry, according to project coordinator, Bernard Dion, Chief Technical Office of Esterel Technologies, the main partner in the project.


“Real-time embedded automotive software is more and more needed to implement basic functions such as efficient engine control, drivers assistance functions such as the Electronic Stability Program (ESP) or Line Departure Warning (LDW) that warns the driver when he/she is leaving the right lane or more comfort functions such as a Seat Memory feature,” he says.

Pointing out that modern high-end cars currently have a complex network of up to 60 computers communicating along many different bus systems, Bernard Dion notes that a number of these functions, such as engine control or ESP, are safety related.

“That means that any failure in these systems can potentially cause an accident. Due to the increase in the number and complexity of these systems, it becomes necessary to provide automotive manufacturers and their suppliers with the necessary tools to develop these systems in a safe and cost-effective manner,” he says.

Explaining the advantages that the RISE toolset brings over existing technologies, Bernard Dion says that the software development tools developed as part of the project allows for a number of improvements, including:

  • the efficient development of the software by using model-based development, a technique that allows automatic generation of the software code from a high-level model of its functionalities;
  • the generation of efficient code on the target processors that can meet stringent cost constraints, in this instance in the automotive industry;
  • the validation that software is safe by providing efficient means such as formal verification of safety properties;
  • safe and efficient communication over new kinds of buses that have started to appear in the automotive industry (TTA or Flexray).

Among the principal challenges to be overcome in making the project a success, Bernard Dion cites the fact that model-based design and development is a relatively new concept in automotive applications. Another barrier was the relative lack of regulation to precisely describe the processes that are mandatory to follow in the development and verification of safety-related applications in cars.

“This has been regulated in the aeronautics industry for many years but is not yet the case in the automotive industry. Also, the adoption of new standards for buses (TTA or FLexRay) will still take a few years,” he says. Despite these difficulties, the project partners were pleased with the performance of the toolset when it was tested in a real-world environment.

“The RISE toolset was successfully tested by AUDI on a prototype car with a Drive-By-Wire system, where electronic controls are used to supplement the driver controls or even provide full authority over the vehicle functions, thus exercising all of the functionalities of the toolset,” says Dion.

With interest burgeoning in real-time embedded systems in automotive applications, the commercial prospects for RISE are plentiful, according to Bernard Dion. “The RISE toolset is currently in use at several automotive sites, at least partially, both with automotive manufacturers and suppliers, for production cars,” he says.

The progress made in the RISE project will also find new life in the IST project DECOS, which deals with the development of dependable architecture for domains such as the automotive or aeronautics sectors.

Tara Morris | alfa
Further information:
http://istresults.cordis.lu/

More articles from Automotive Engineering:

nachricht The Future of Mobility: tomorrow’s ways of getting from A to B
07.09.2017 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Angewandte Informationstechnik FIT

nachricht ShAPEing the future of magnesium car parts
23.08.2017 | DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

All articles from Automotive Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: The fastest light-driven current source

Controlling electronic current is essential to modern electronics, as data and signals are transferred by streams of electrons which are controlled at high speed. Demands on transmission speeds are also increasing as technology develops. Scientists from the Chair of Laser Physics and the Chair of Applied Physics at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) have succeeded in switching on a current with a desired direction in graphene using a single laser pulse within a femtosecond ¬¬ – a femtosecond corresponds to the millionth part of a billionth of a second. This is more than a thousand times faster compared to the most efficient transistors today.

Graphene is up to the job

Im Focus: LaserTAB: More efficient and precise contacts thanks to human-robot collaboration

At the productronica trade fair in Munich this November, the Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT will be presenting Laser-Based Tape-Automated Bonding, LaserTAB for short. The experts from Aachen will be demonstrating how new battery cells and power electronics can be micro-welded more efficiently and precisely than ever before thanks to new optics and robot support.

Fraunhofer ILT from Aachen relies on a clever combination of robotics and a laser scanner with new optics as well as process monitoring, which it has developed...

Im Focus: The pyrenoid is a carbon-fixing liquid droplet

Plants and algae use the enzyme Rubisco to fix carbon dioxide, removing it from the atmosphere and converting it into biomass. Algae have figured out a way to increase the efficiency of carbon fixation. They gather most of their Rubisco into a ball-shaped microcompartment called the pyrenoid, which they flood with a high local concentration of carbon dioxide. A team of scientists at Princeton University, the Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford University and the Max Plank Institute of Biochemistry have unravelled the mysteries of how the pyrenoid is assembled. These insights can help to engineer crops that remove more carbon dioxide from the atmosphere while producing more food.

A warming planet

Im Focus: Highly precise wiring in the Cerebral Cortex

Our brains house extremely complex neuronal circuits, whose detailed structures are still largely unknown. This is especially true for the so-called cerebral cortex of mammals, where among other things vision, thoughts or spatial orientation are being computed. Here the rules by which nerve cells are connected to each other are only partly understood. A team of scientists around Moritz Helmstaedter at the Frankfiurt Max Planck Institute for Brain Research and Helene Schmidt (Humboldt University in Berlin) have now discovered a surprisingly precise nerve cell connectivity pattern in the part of the cerebral cortex that is responsible for orienting the individual animal or human in space.

The researchers report online in Nature (Schmidt et al., 2017. Axonal synapse sorting in medial entorhinal cortex, DOI: 10.1038/nature24005) that synapses in...

Im Focus: Tiny lasers from a gallery of whispers

New technique promises tunable laser devices

Whispering gallery mode (WGM) resonators are used to make tiny micro-lasers, sensors, switches, routers and other devices. These tiny structures rely on a...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

“Lasers in Composites Symposium” in Aachen – from Science to Application

19.09.2017 | Event News

I-ESA 2018 – Call for Papers

12.09.2017 | Event News

EMBO at Basel Life, a new conference on current and emerging life science research

06.09.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Goodbye, login. Hello, heart scan

26.09.2017 | Information Technology

The material that obscures supermassive black holes

26.09.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Ageless ears? Elderly barn owls do not become hard of hearing

26.09.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>