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Asian exports to increase with new Aussie soybean

10.03.2005


A new CSIRO Plant Industry bred soybean variety, ’Snowy’, is set to enhance the profitability of the Australian soybean industry due to higher yields and better quality soybeans.



Developed by CSIRO Plant Industry’s Dr Andrew James, Snowy (name pending approval with Plant Breeder’s Rights) combines good tofu making qualities with good agronomic traits ­ one of the first soybeans to do so. "Snowy is highly suited to the Riverina region of NSW and northern Victoria, where it performs as well as the leading variety for high yield, Djakal," Dr James says.

"What sets Snowy apart from other high yielding varieties is that it also has good tofu making properties, like the variety Curringa, making it more desirable for tofu producers."


Riverina growers receive up to a $200 a tonne premium on soybeans sold for tofu compared to soybeans sold for oilseeds, so Snowy will be a real boon for them.

After Snowy achieved positive results for desirable tofu making properties in Japan it is now hoped the variety will lead Australia’s high quality soybean exports to a range of Asian countries as well as supply lucrative local tofu making markets in Sydney and Melbourne.

Trials of Snowy have been conducted in the Riverina by the NSW Department of Primary Industries and in northern Victoria by the Victorian Department of Primary Industries since 1998, showing Snowy’s suitability for the area.

Snowy has been screened for Phytophthora resistance, and it has proven to have the best available resistance of existing soybeans.

Seed from Snowy is being increased this season and will be commercially available to growers for planting in late 2005.

"Snowy has demonstrated that it is as an excellent variety for the Riverina and northern Victoria regions and one that should provide growers with significantly better returns because of its high yield, large seed, and suitability for tofu making," says Dr James.

This research is supported by the Grains Research and Development Corporation.

More information

Dr Andrew James, CSIRO Plant Industry: (07) 3214 2278, 0418 192 396

Bill Stephens | CSIRO
Further information:
http://www.csiro.au

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