Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Potato-related plant species exhaust potato cyst nematode

11.04.2003


Dutch plant ecologists have investigated how the potato cyst nematode can be controlled using Solanum sisymbriifolium, a member of the potato family. The plant produces a hatching agent which causes the nematode’’s eggs to hatch. However, the nematodes which eat the plant can no longer reproduce.

Potato cyst nematodes attack the roots of potato plants. After harvest the nematodes remain in the soil in the form of cysts. These are the dead bodies of female nematodes that are filled with eggs. The eggs remain dormant until they come into contact with a substance exuded from the roots of potato plants. Solanum sisymbrifolium, a member of the potato family, has been found to exude the same hatching agent as the potato. The substance elicits the development of the eggs into nematodes. Although the nematodes feed on Solanum sisymbriifolium, the plant does not provide the nematodes the opportunity of completing their life cycle and thus reproducing. The reason for this is not yet clear.

The researchers from Wageningen University have extensively investigated Solanum sisymbriifolium so as to optimise the effectiveness of its use. For example, they are determining the minimum size of plant needed to thoroughly clean the soil of cysts. The intention is to cultivate Solanum sisymbriifolium somewhere in the period between potato harvest and the planting of the next potato crop. If the crop is ploughed in it also acts as a green manure crop.



Various companies in the potato sector are involved in the research. One of these, a potato seed company from Groningen, has meanwhile acquired the breeding rights to a number of Solanum sisymbriifolium varieties. At present the plant is only being cultivated on a few hundred hectares on a trial basis. Potato growers will only be able to use the crop on a large scale once the growing conditions under which this Latin-American plant is most effective have been determined. Research must also demonstrate that the plant will not affect potato production.

Potato cyst nematode is difficult to control. Farmers are only allowed to use nematicides (pesticides against nematodes) if there are no other options for control. In the past good results were obtained using potato plants that were resistant to the nematodes. However, the nematode always managed to overcome each line of resistance.

The research is being carried out by plant ecologist Jan Vos and PhD student Bart Timmermans. The idea of using Solanum sisymbriifolium came from Klaas Scholte, a now pensioned former researcher at Wageningen University, who in the 1990s tested about one hundred species from the potato family in pots, in order to find a plant which produced the hatching agent but was also resistant to the nematodes.

Nalinie Moerlie | alfa
Further information:
http://www.nwo.nl

More articles from Agricultural and Forestry Science:

nachricht Kakao in Monokultur verträgt Trockenheit besser als Kakao in Mischsystemen
18.09.2017 | Georg-August-Universität Göttingen

nachricht Ultrasound sensors make forage harvesters more reliable
28.08.2017 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Zerstörungsfreie Prüfverfahren IZFP

All articles from Agricultural and Forestry Science >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Tiny lasers from a gallery of whispers

New technique promises tunable laser devices

Whispering gallery mode (WGM) resonators are used to make tiny micro-lasers, sensors, switches, routers and other devices. These tiny structures rely on a...

Im Focus: Ultrafast snapshots of relaxing electrons in solids

Using ultrafast flashes of laser and x-ray radiation, scientists at the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics (Garching, Germany) took snapshots of the briefest electron motion inside a solid material to date. The electron motion lasted only 750 billionths of the billionth of a second before it fainted, setting a new record of human capability to capture ultrafast processes inside solids!

When x-rays shine onto solid materials or large molecules, an electron is pushed away from its original place near the nucleus of the atom, leaving a hole...

Im Focus: Quantum Sensors Decipher Magnetic Ordering in a New Semiconducting Material

For the first time, physicists have successfully imaged spiral magnetic ordering in a multiferroic material. These materials are considered highly promising candidates for future data storage media. The researchers were able to prove their findings using unique quantum sensors that were developed at Basel University and that can analyze electromagnetic fields on the nanometer scale. The results – obtained by scientists from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics, the Swiss Nanoscience Institute, the University of Montpellier and several laboratories from University Paris-Saclay – were recently published in the journal Nature.

Multiferroics are materials that simultaneously react to electric and magnetic fields. These two properties are rarely found together, and their combined...

Im Focus: Fast, convenient & standardized: New lab innovation for automated tissue engineering & drug

MBM ScienceBridge GmbH successfully negotiated a license agreement between University Medical Center Göttingen (UMG) and the biotech company Tissue Systems Holding GmbH about commercial use of a multi-well tissue plate for automated and reliable tissue engineering & drug testing.

MBM ScienceBridge GmbH successfully negotiated a license agreement between University Medical Center Göttingen (UMG) and the biotech company Tissue Systems...

Im Focus: Silencing bacteria

HZI researchers pave the way for new agents that render hospital pathogens mute

Pathogenic bacteria are becoming resistant to common antibiotics to an ever increasing degree. One of the most difficult germs is Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

“Lasers in Composites Symposium” in Aachen – from Science to Application

19.09.2017 | Event News

I-ESA 2018 – Call for Papers

12.09.2017 | Event News

EMBO at Basel Life, a new conference on current and emerging life science research

06.09.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Molecular Force Sensors

20.09.2017 | Life Sciences

Producing electricity during flight

20.09.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Tiny lasers from a gallery of whispers

20.09.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>