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Technical Paper Demonstrates Positive Global Impact of Next Generation of “Greener” Latex

The latex industry can continue to be profitable and competitive without wasting natural resources thanks to green improvements, says a new technical paper. According to co-author, William R. Doyle, President and CEO of Vystar® Corporation, believes what is critical to the sustainability of the latex industry is recognizing the need for and importance of natural products that minimize environmental impact while maximizing economic, health and safety benefits.

The paper, titled “Balancing Material Acquisition and Production Costs: Quantifying the True Cost of Aluminum Hydroxide Treated Natural Rubber Latex,” was recently presented at the Smithers RAPRA’s Sixth International Latex & Synthetic Polymer Dispersions Conference in Amsterdam, The Netherlands. The paper provides a comprehensive analysis, using actual manufacturer case studies, of the cost and performance benefits of using Vytex® Natural Rubber Latex (NRL) as a safer alternative to standard latex and a greener substitute for synthetics in multiple product applications.

There are over 40,000 types of products made from traditional natural rubber latex (NRL). The most prominent are dipped goods encompassing nearly 50% of latex production (gloves, condoms, toy balloons, breather bags, tubing). Other products made from latex include foam products (mattresses, pillows, and cushions), adhesives (pressure sensitive applications, footwear, and carpet backing), and elastic thread (socks, hosiery and undergarments). The high demand for these products is increasing pressure in the industry for modified NRLs that significantly reduce the antigenic proteins believed to cause latex allergies while preserving precious natural resources.

Vytex NRL Equals Less Water:
However, key to the production of many latex products is the use of natural resources such as water. “Water is not only important to human survival but also important to many sectors of the economy. The future of any society, people and business, depends on the preservation of water resources as part of the sustainable development process. Companies need to think about how much water they are using and consuming in their processes. An ultra low protein, greener latex that preserves the integrity of NRL without consuming large volumes of water is key to the next generation of latex,” reports Doyle.

A recent United Nations Human Development Report notes the growing scarcity of water resources in heavy manufacturing areas such as China and India. The significant reduction in the utilization of water associated with using Vytex NRL in various production models—linked to the decreased need for repeated washing and leaching and associated energy consumption —makes it not only a green solution but supports environmental sustainability in the water-stressed countries around the world.

The paper notes that modified latex such as Vytex NRL offers performance improvements and manufacturing cost savings that offset the premium associated with the raw material when compared to standard NRL.

In fact, the paper includes a specific case study involving an actual global glove manufacturer in India, whereby the company reported potential savings of $472,500 annually by eliminating several of the secondary leaching steps it currently uses to remove proteins.

Turning to the specific market advantages of Vytex NRL, the paper acknowledges increased consumer interest in the natural rubber latex bedding market fueled by environmental awareness and the link between better sleep and better health, including pillows and mattresses. Vytex NRL foams offer a cleaner appearance and significantly reduced odor due to the ultra low levels of protein and non-rubbers, providing an added cost benefit for the manufacturer by reducing the use of compounding additives, such as whiteners and fragrances, and a more pleasurable sleep experience for the consumer.

Further advantages to Vytex NRL are found within the adhesives market as Vytex NRL adhesives have been shown to exhibit stability before and after spraying, as well as improved consistency and less clumping, without sacrificing adhesion quality and tackiness. Doyle points out that a European dressing manufacturer reports that the use of Vytex NRL achieved a 95% reduction in proteins in cohesive medical bandages over their standard NRL, thus lessening the risk of sensitive skin reactions.

Greener Balloons -- Reason to Celebrate:
Additionally, consumers can reap the benefits of “greener” latex in the balloon market. A modified NRL offers considerable manufacturing and performance benefits over standard balloons on the market. According to the paper, tests show that balloons made with a modified NRL exhibit more vibrant colors with less pigment usage in the dyeing process. This is due to the natural white color of Vytex NRL compared to the yellowish pigmentation consistent with traditional NRL. In addition, Vytex NRL balloons have been shown to retain air 60.6% longer and helium 50% longer than balloons made from standard NRL over comparable periods of time. “In an effort to prevent latex allergies, many hospitals ban latex balloons, opting instead for eco-unfriendly mylar balloons, which are much more detrimental to the environment and wildlife. Vytex NRL may now allow for a much more eco-friendly product that is both patient and environmentally friendly,” says Doyle.

Mr. Doyle said, “Our paper puts forth a compelling case for the superiority of Vytex NRL over standard NRL across a variety of measures, including cost of production, environmental considerations, and physical performance characteristics of the finished product. By presenting at the Latex & Synthetic Polymer Dispersions Conference, we are not only drawing attention to the market potential of Vytex NRL; we are also signaling Vystar’s position as a growing company that can increasingly satisfy consumer demand for a broad range of latex products without exposure to petrochemical issues.”

About Vystar Corporation
Based in Duluth, GA, Vystar Corporation (OTC BB: VYST.OB) is the exclusive creator of Vytex® Natural Rubber Latex (NRL), a patented, all-natural raw material that significantly reduces antigenic proteins found in natural rubber latex and can be used in over 40,000 products. Vystar is working with manufacturers across a broad range of consumer and medical products to bring Vytex NRL to market in adhesives, toy balloons, surgical and exam gloves, other medical devices and natural rubber latex foam mattresses, pillows and sponges.

Janet Vasquez | Newswise Science News
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