Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

For markets of the future, success depends on advanced materials

19.03.2003


Technical Insights’ materials and chemicals research service: Advanced materials technology



Advanced materials look set to revolutionize numerous applications in the 21st century. Scientists and engineers are undertaking extensive research activities in their quest to develop sophisticated new materials that are more durable, environmentally friendly, and energy efficient.

"Advanced materials and chemicals are the enabling building blocks for future devices and systems," says Technical Insights Analyst Aninditta Savitry.


Emerging photonic materials have abundant potential applications in present and future information- and image-processing technologies. Sustained research in porous materials such as zeolites and synthetic zeolites over the past decade has expanded their applications beyond traditional catalysts, separations, and absorbents to include areas as diverse as microelectronics and medical diagnosis.

Scientists are on the verge of achieving a breakthrough with versatile materials such as inorganic nanoparticle/polymer matrix composites, which combine the advantages of different materials to achieve a much-desired multifunctionality.

Critical applications for biopolymers in packaging and food production, combined with the unique properties of these materials, promise new commercial opportunities.

Adds Savitry, "The expanding market for biodegradable polymers - especially in the medical and pharmaceutical industries - is only restrained by relatively high production costs."

Research laboratories are attempting to make these superior materials affordable.

In addition, researchers are currently developing and exploring innovative applications, including the use of biorubber in engineering blood vessels, heart valves, liver, and cartilage. Although not yet approved by the Food and Drug Administration, they are optimistic about its success.

Despite high production costs for advanced materials, the sustained efforts of laboratories and start-up companies, aided by government agencies, is helping them reach commercialization and utilization in real-world applications.


###
New analysis by Technical Insights, a business unit of Frost & Sullivan (www.Technical-Insights.frost.com), Materials and Chemicals Research Service: Advanced Materials Technology, discusses important developments, research breakthroughs, and existing and future applications for advanced materials.

Technical Insights will hold a conference call at 1:00 p.m. (EST)/ 10:00 a.m. (PST) on March 25, 2003 to provide a summary and analysis of the latest developments in materials and chemicals. Those interested in participating in the call should send an email to Julia Paulson at jpaulson@frost.com with the following information for registration:

Full name, Company Name, Title, Contact Tel Number, Contact Fax Number, Email. Upon receipt of the above information, a confirmation/pass code for the live briefing will be emailed to you.

Frost & Sullivan is a global leader in strategic growth consulting. Acquired by Frost & Sullivan, Technical Insights is an international technology analysis business that produces a variety of technical news alerts, newsletters, and reports. This ongoing growth opportunity analysis of advanced materials is covered in High Tech Materials Alert, a Technical Insights subscription service, and in Nanoelectronics, a Frost & Sullivan Technical Insights technology report. Technical Insights and Frost & Sullivan also offer custom growth consulting to a variety of national and international companies. Executive summaries and interviews are available to the press.

Materials and Chemicals Research Service: Advanced Materials Technology
D256

Contact:
USA:
Julia Paulson
P: 210-247-3870
F: 210-348-1003
E: jpaulson@frost.com

APAC:
Pramila Gurtoo
DID : 603-6204-5811
Gen : 603-6204-5800
Fax : 603-6201-7402
E: pgurtoo@frost.com

Julia Paulson | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.ti.frost.com/
http://www.Technical-Insights.frost.com
http://www.frost.com

More articles from Materials Sciences:

nachricht New biomaterial could replace plastic laminates, greatly reduce pollution
21.09.2017 | Penn State

nachricht Stopping problem ice -- by cracking it
21.09.2017 | Norwegian University of Science and Technology

All articles from Materials Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: The pyrenoid is a carbon-fixing liquid droplet

Plants and algae use the enzyme Rubisco to fix carbon dioxide, removing it from the atmosphere and converting it into biomass. Algae have figured out a way to increase the efficiency of carbon fixation. They gather most of their Rubisco into a ball-shaped microcompartment called the pyrenoid, which they flood with a high local concentration of carbon dioxide. A team of scientists at Princeton University, the Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford University and the Max Plank Institute of Biochemistry have unravelled the mysteries of how the pyrenoid is assembled. These insights can help to engineer crops that remove more carbon dioxide from the atmosphere while producing more food.

A warming planet

Im Focus: Highly precise wiring in the Cerebral Cortex

Our brains house extremely complex neuronal circuits, whose detailed structures are still largely unknown. This is especially true for the so-called cerebral cortex of mammals, where among other things vision, thoughts or spatial orientation are being computed. Here the rules by which nerve cells are connected to each other are only partly understood. A team of scientists around Moritz Helmstaedter at the Frankfiurt Max Planck Institute for Brain Research and Helene Schmidt (Humboldt University in Berlin) have now discovered a surprisingly precise nerve cell connectivity pattern in the part of the cerebral cortex that is responsible for orienting the individual animal or human in space.

The researchers report online in Nature (Schmidt et al., 2017. Axonal synapse sorting in medial entorhinal cortex, DOI: 10.1038/nature24005) that synapses in...

Im Focus: Tiny lasers from a gallery of whispers

New technique promises tunable laser devices

Whispering gallery mode (WGM) resonators are used to make tiny micro-lasers, sensors, switches, routers and other devices. These tiny structures rely on a...

Im Focus: Ultrafast snapshots of relaxing electrons in solids

Using ultrafast flashes of laser and x-ray radiation, scientists at the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics (Garching, Germany) took snapshots of the briefest electron motion inside a solid material to date. The electron motion lasted only 750 billionths of the billionth of a second before it fainted, setting a new record of human capability to capture ultrafast processes inside solids!

When x-rays shine onto solid materials or large molecules, an electron is pushed away from its original place near the nucleus of the atom, leaving a hole...

Im Focus: Quantum Sensors Decipher Magnetic Ordering in a New Semiconducting Material

For the first time, physicists have successfully imaged spiral magnetic ordering in a multiferroic material. These materials are considered highly promising candidates for future data storage media. The researchers were able to prove their findings using unique quantum sensors that were developed at Basel University and that can analyze electromagnetic fields on the nanometer scale. The results – obtained by scientists from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics, the Swiss Nanoscience Institute, the University of Montpellier and several laboratories from University Paris-Saclay – were recently published in the journal Nature.

Multiferroics are materials that simultaneously react to electric and magnetic fields. These two properties are rarely found together, and their combined...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

“Lasers in Composites Symposium” in Aachen – from Science to Application

19.09.2017 | Event News

I-ESA 2018 – Call for Papers

12.09.2017 | Event News

EMBO at Basel Life, a new conference on current and emerging life science research

06.09.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Rainbow colors reveal cell history: Uncovering β-cell heterogeneity

22.09.2017 | Life Sciences

Penn first in world to treat patient with new radiation technology

22.09.2017 | Medical Engineering

Calculating quietness

22.09.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>