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For markets of the future, success depends on advanced materials

19.03.2003


Technical Insights’ materials and chemicals research service: Advanced materials technology



Advanced materials look set to revolutionize numerous applications in the 21st century. Scientists and engineers are undertaking extensive research activities in their quest to develop sophisticated new materials that are more durable, environmentally friendly, and energy efficient.

"Advanced materials and chemicals are the enabling building blocks for future devices and systems," says Technical Insights Analyst Aninditta Savitry.


Emerging photonic materials have abundant potential applications in present and future information- and image-processing technologies. Sustained research in porous materials such as zeolites and synthetic zeolites over the past decade has expanded their applications beyond traditional catalysts, separations, and absorbents to include areas as diverse as microelectronics and medical diagnosis.

Scientists are on the verge of achieving a breakthrough with versatile materials such as inorganic nanoparticle/polymer matrix composites, which combine the advantages of different materials to achieve a much-desired multifunctionality.

Critical applications for biopolymers in packaging and food production, combined with the unique properties of these materials, promise new commercial opportunities.

Adds Savitry, "The expanding market for biodegradable polymers - especially in the medical and pharmaceutical industries - is only restrained by relatively high production costs."

Research laboratories are attempting to make these superior materials affordable.

In addition, researchers are currently developing and exploring innovative applications, including the use of biorubber in engineering blood vessels, heart valves, liver, and cartilage. Although not yet approved by the Food and Drug Administration, they are optimistic about its success.

Despite high production costs for advanced materials, the sustained efforts of laboratories and start-up companies, aided by government agencies, is helping them reach commercialization and utilization in real-world applications.


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New analysis by Technical Insights, a business unit of Frost & Sullivan (www.Technical-Insights.frost.com), Materials and Chemicals Research Service: Advanced Materials Technology, discusses important developments, research breakthroughs, and existing and future applications for advanced materials.

Technical Insights will hold a conference call at 1:00 p.m. (EST)/ 10:00 a.m. (PST) on March 25, 2003 to provide a summary and analysis of the latest developments in materials and chemicals. Those interested in participating in the call should send an email to Julia Paulson at jpaulson@frost.com with the following information for registration:

Full name, Company Name, Title, Contact Tel Number, Contact Fax Number, Email. Upon receipt of the above information, a confirmation/pass code for the live briefing will be emailed to you.

Frost & Sullivan is a global leader in strategic growth consulting. Acquired by Frost & Sullivan, Technical Insights is an international technology analysis business that produces a variety of technical news alerts, newsletters, and reports. This ongoing growth opportunity analysis of advanced materials is covered in High Tech Materials Alert, a Technical Insights subscription service, and in Nanoelectronics, a Frost & Sullivan Technical Insights technology report. Technical Insights and Frost & Sullivan also offer custom growth consulting to a variety of national and international companies. Executive summaries and interviews are available to the press.

Materials and Chemicals Research Service: Advanced Materials Technology
D256

Contact:
USA:
Julia Paulson
P: 210-247-3870
F: 210-348-1003
E: jpaulson@frost.com

APAC:
Pramila Gurtoo
DID : 603-6204-5811
Gen : 603-6204-5800
Fax : 603-6201-7402
E: pgurtoo@frost.com

Julia Paulson | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.ti.frost.com/
http://www.Technical-Insights.frost.com
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