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New modular Instron® CEAST Melt Flow Testers perform measurements according to ISO 1133-2

11.10.2012
The new, modular Instron® CEAST MF20 and MF30 Melt Flow Testers are versatile single-weight measurement systems suitable for use both in research and development and in advanced quality control.
They provide the user with increased convenience for easy and accurate measurement of the flow properties of plastics according to ASTM D1238 and ISO 1133. Both lines of melt flow testers conform to strict tolerances with regard to temperature accuracy and stability, specimen quantity and pre-treatment, complying with the stringent requirements of the new testing standard ISO 1133-2 for materials sensitive to time-temperature history and/or moisture.

The CEAST MF30 includes a weight magazine and weight lifter (available as an option for MF20). The weight magazine contains a complete set of 8 test masses ranging from 0.325 kg (piston mass) up to 21.6 kg for testing a wide spectrum of materials, from fast-flowing masterbatches to highly viscous elastomers or filled thermoplastic polymers. A high-convenience mechanical system, the newly developed Manual Mass Selector, enables pre-selection of the required test mass, thus facilitating preparation and execution of the tests. All test masses remain installed on the machine at all times. This eliminates the need to handle and apply heavy test masses and significantly enhances the safety of the laboratory staff.

A further standard feature of the MF30 model (not available for MF20 models) is a high-resolution load cell for controlled compacting of the material prior to the start of the test, with a maximum force of 750 N. Also included in the test system as part of the standard equipment is a high-precision encoder, which permits the controlled extrusion of the melt to a defined height. The software supplied moreover enables purging of the barrel at the end of a test, specifically when testing low MFR materials.

The MF20 is offered as a basic instrument to be configured with a variety of options, such as a manual or motorized melt cutting device and a high-resolution digital encoder for MVR measurements according to ASTM D1238, Methods B and C (included as standard on MF30 models). Depending on the application in hand, both models can be extended with additional modules, including a die plugging device to prevent material flowing during pre-heating, a nitrogen blanket device for testing hygroscopic materials, an acid-resistant version for chemically aggressive materials and the CEAST VisualMelt Software for storage, analysis and graphical presentation of results. Both models feature an integrated operator panel with LCD display and a compact, ergonomically enhanced design, all of which enable testing, service and maintenance to be performed conveniently, quickly and safely.

Instron is a globally leading manufacturer of test equipment for the material and structural testing markets. A global company providing single-source convenience, Instron manufactures and services products used to test the mechanical properties and performance of various materials, components and structures in a wide array of environments. Instron systems evaluate materials ranging from the most fragile filament to advanced high-strength alloys. With the combined experience of CEAST in designing plastic testing systems, Instron enhances materials testing offerings, providing customers with comprehensive solutions for all their research, quality and service-life testing requirements. Additionally, Instron offers a broad range of service capabilities, including assistance with laboratory management, calibration expertise and customer training.

Instron is part of the Test and Measurement division of the US based Illinois Tool Works (ITW) group of companies with more than 850 distributed business units in 52 countries worldwide and a staff of approx. 60,000.

Weitere Informationen: www.instron.de


Contact:
Instron European Headquarters
Attn. Sam Heudebourck
Coronation Road, High Wycombe
Buckinghamshire, England, HP12 3SY
Tel: +44 1494 464646
Info_news(at)instron.com

International coordination:
Simone Hebel
Marcom Specialist
Instron Deutschland GmbH
Werner-von-Siemens-Straße 2
D-64319 Pfungstadt/Germany
Tel. : +49 (0) 6157 4029 614
simone_hebel(at)instron.com

Editorial contact:
Dr.-Ing. Jörg Wolters,
Konsens PR GmbH & Co. KG,
Hans-Kudlich-Straße 25,
D-64823 Groß-Umstadt
Tel.: +49 (0) 60 78 / 93 63 - 0,
Fax: - 20
mail(at)konsens.de

Dr.-Ing. Jörg Wolters | Konsens PR

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