Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Environmentally friendly corrosion protection shows its effect by simple spraying

05.04.2012
Materials researchers from Saarbruecken developed a new composite material, which prevents corrosion of metals even under extreme conditions in an environmentally friendly way.

It can be used, wherever metals are exposed to strong weather conditions, aggressive gases, salty media, extensive wear and tear or high pressure. From 23 to 27 April 2012, researchers of INM — Leibniz Institute for New Materials present their results at the leading trade fair "Research and Technology" in Hall 2 at the stand C54.


corrosion protection
Foto: Uwe Bellhäuser

"This patented composite shows its effect by simple spraying", explains Carsten Becker-Willinger, head of the program division "Nanomere". "What makes this coating so special is its structuring: The protective particles arrange themselves like roof-tiles. Similar to a wall, several layers of particles arrange themselves in a staggered pattern on top of each other, resulting in a self-organized, highly structured barrier", says the expert for chemical nanotechnology.

The protective coating is only a few millimeters thick and prevents the penetration of gases and electrolytes. It protects from corrosion caused by aggressive aqueous solutions, such as salty solutions (e.g. splash water containing road salt or sea water) or aqueous acids (e.g. acid rain). The protective coating is also an effective barrier against corrosive gases or under pressure.

After thermal curing, the composite adheres on metallic substrate, it is abrasion- and impact-resistant. For this purpose, it also withstands a highly mechanical load: The coating passes the ball-drop test with a 1.5 kg semi-spherical steel ball, which is dropped from a height of 1 metre without causing parts to chip off or the coating to crack. Only light deformation is shown. Thus, the new material can also be used with sand or mineral dust without wear and tear.

The composite can be deposited by spraying or with other wet-chemical processes and cured at temperatures from 150 to 200°C. It is suitable for steel, metal alloys or copper. Panels, tubes, cogwheels, tools or engine parts in any shape can be coated. The special mixture consists of a solvent, a binder and nanoscale platelet-like particles, but no chrome VI or other heavy metals.

Contact:
Dr. Carsten Becker-Willinger
Program Division „Nanomere“
INM – Leibniz-Institut für Neue Materialien
Phone: +49 681 9300 196
Email: nanomere@inm-gmbh.de
INM, situated in Saarbruecken/Germany, is an internationally leading research centre for innovative materials. Specialised in the three research fields of Chemical Nanotechnology, Interface Materials and Materials in Biology, the institute provides research and development from molecule to pilot production delivered by a highly skilled team of chemists, physicists, biologists, materials and engineering scientists. It cooperates with national and international institutes and develops materials with tailor-made properties for companies throughout the world. INM is an institute of the Scientific Association Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz and employs around 190 collaborators.

Dr. Carola Jung | idw
Further information:
http://www.inm-gmbh.de/
http://www.wgl.de/

More articles from Materials Sciences:

nachricht Argon is not the 'dope' for metallic hydrogen
24.03.2017 | Carnegie Institution for Science

nachricht Researchers make flexible glass for tiny medical devices
24.03.2017 | Brigham Young University

All articles from Materials Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Giant Magnetic Fields in the Universe

Astronomers from Bonn and Tautenburg in Thuringia (Germany) used the 100-m radio telescope at Effelsberg to observe several galaxy clusters. At the edges of these large accumulations of dark matter, stellar systems (galaxies), hot gas, and charged particles, they found magnetic fields that are exceptionally ordered over distances of many million light years. This makes them the most extended magnetic fields in the universe known so far.

The results will be published on March 22 in the journal „Astronomy & Astrophysics“.

Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound structures in the universe. With a typical extent of about 10 million light years, i.e. 100 times the...

Im Focus: Tracing down linear ubiquitination

Researchers at the Goethe University Frankfurt, together with partners from the University of Tübingen in Germany and Queen Mary University as well as Francis Crick Institute from London (UK) have developed a novel technology to decipher the secret ubiquitin code.

Ubiquitin is a small protein that can be linked to other cellular proteins, thereby controlling and modulating their functions. The attachment occurs in many...

Im Focus: Perovskite edges can be tuned for optoelectronic performance

Layered 2D material improves efficiency for solar cells and LEDs

In the eternal search for next generation high-efficiency solar cells and LEDs, scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory and their partners are creating...

Im Focus: Polymer-coated silicon nanosheets as alternative to graphene: A perfect team for nanoelectronics

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are less stable. Now researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have, for the first time ever, produced a composite material combining silicon nanosheets and a polymer that is both UV-resistant and easy to process. This brings the scientists a significant step closer to industrial applications like flexible displays and photosensors.

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are...

Im Focus: Researchers Imitate Molecular Crowding in Cells

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to simulate these confined natural conditions in artificial vesicles for the first time. As reported in the academic journal Small, the results are offering better insight into the development of nanoreactors and artificial organelles.

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

International Land Use Symposium ILUS 2017: Call for Abstracts and Registration open

20.03.2017 | Event News

CONNECT 2017: International congress on connective tissue

14.03.2017 | Event News

ICTM Conference: Turbine Construction between Big Data and Additive Manufacturing

07.03.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Argon is not the 'dope' for metallic hydrogen

24.03.2017 | Materials Sciences

Astronomers find unexpected, dust-obscured star formation in distant galaxy

24.03.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Gravitational wave kicks monster black hole out of galactic core

24.03.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>