Flaxseed no help for hot flashes during breast cancer or menopause

The randomized, placebo-controlled study followed 188 women between October and December 2009 and found no statistically significant difference in mean hot flash scores between women taking flaxseed and those taking a placebo. Preliminary data published in 2007 by Mayo Clinic investigators had suggested that consuming 40 grams of crushed flaxseed daily might help manage hot flashes.

“Hot flashes are common among women during the menopause transition or following breast cancer treatment,” says Dr. Pruthi, of Mayo Clinic's Breast Diagnostic Clinic. “While preliminary data from our 2007 pilot study showed a reduction in hot flashes associated with the consumption of ground flaxseed, our new study did not result in a significant decrease in hot flashes with eating flaxseed compared to placebo.”

Dr. Pruthi says patients shouldn't give up flaxseed if they enjoy it. “Flaxseed may be beneficial for people who want to add fiber and bulk to their diet to manage constipation,” says Dr. Pruthi, “but more research is needed to identify whether flaxseed has any other health benefits.”

Other study investigators include Rui Qin, Ph.D., Heshan Liu, Charles Loprinzi, M.D., who is the Regis Professor of Breast Cancer Research, and Debra Barton, Ph.D., all of Mayo Clinic.

About Mayo Clinic

Mayo Clinic is a nonprofit worldwide leader in medical care, research and education for people from all walks of life. For more information, visit www.mayoclinic.com and www.mayoclinic.org/news.

Media Contact

Joseph Dangor EurekAlert!

Weitere Informationen:

http://www.mayo.edu

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