Medical Engineering

The development of medical equipment, products and technical procedures is characterized by high research and development costs in a variety of fields related to the study of human medicine.

innovations-report provides informative and stimulating reports and articles on topics ranging from imaging processes, cell and tissue techniques, optical techniques, implants, orthopedic aids, clinical and medical office equipment, dialysis systems and x-ray/radiation monitoring devices to endoscopy, ultrasound, surgical techniques, and dental materials.

New MR applications improve diagnostics: Siemens presented innovative syngo MR applications at the ECR

Siemens Medical Solutions introduces new IT-based solutions for magnetic resonance tomography at the ECR. These so-called syngo MR applications simplify workflows in clinical routine, for example, imaging of the spine, the thorax or diffusion-weighted imaging in the body and 3D acquisitions with various contrasts. These applications enable faster and more accurate diagnosis and improve the efficiency of the hospital. The new syngo MR applications are based on Tim (Total imaging matrix) tec

Plastic chip measures blood sugar and assures the quality of food

The sensor, which measures 10 mm x 10 mm, can replace advanced, expensive optical devices containing lenses and grids in what are commonly called spectroscopic tools. The sensor is also more reliable than traditional optical devices that require calibrating and maintenance. This chip does not corrode, is robust and provides quick results from analyses. The chips can be produced in the same type of machines that make compact discs.

The plastic chip was originally developed to detect di

New sensor to provide early warning of oxygen loss to unborn children

Researchers at the University of Warwick, and the University Hospitals Coventry and Warwickshire NHS Trust, have devised a new sensor which dramatically improves the amount of early warning doctors and midwives get of a dangerous situation in the birth process when the unborn child’s brain is starved of oxygen – Fetal Hypoxia.

The threat of fetal hypoxia carries dangers not only for the child but also for the woman giving birth as doctors often proceed quickly to a caesarean section i

Disposable catheter breakthrough, a world first

A unique low cost disposable solid-state catheter that can measure swallowing pressure has been developed by a University of South Australia research team using intelligent manufacturing processes that eliminate the infection risks posed by existing catheters.

Believed to be the first of its kind in the world, the catheter is one of the new products being developed in the emerging field of bio micro-electro-mechanical systems, or BioMEMS, which have applications in the biomedical fiel

Computer systems assisting orthopaedic surgeons

The EUREKA project E! 2288 on Computer-aided orthopaedic care (MEDAC) is helping orthopaedic surgeons to not only document their clinical cases, but to also manage and analyse all patient data compiled. This award-winning project is revolutionising orthopaedic research and could be applicable to many other specialist areas of medicine. Patients benefit from a fast and documented diagnosis, while surgeons gain access to vast resources of reference data and the means to analyse their own patients’ re

Carnegie Mellon develops non-invasive technique to detect transplant rejection at cellular level

Research could revolutionize care of transplant patients

Carnegie Mellon University scientist Chien Ho and his colleagues have developed a promising tool that uses magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to track immune cells as they infiltrate a transplanted heart in the early stages of organ rejection. This pre-clinical advance, described in an upcoming issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), ultimately could provide a non-invasive way to detect transplan

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