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Uppsala University part of major European commitment to growth

20.12.2007
Uppsala University has been selected for the prestigious EU assignment to lead one of four pilot projects to provide novel models and experience of excellence-driven integrated partnerships at European level.

"It´s fantastic to get this opportunity", beams Håkan Engqvist at UU Innovation, who will be coordinating the project.

The pilot projects can provide useful insights for the development of more integrated partnerships, which are the cornerstone of the future European Institute of Innovation and Technology. but also of other EU initiatives. In particular, the pilots are expected to provide novel models and experiences of excellence-driven partnerships in the context of the knowledge triangle, in line with the aims of the EIT (see facts).

Among the 50 consortia that applied (composed by organisations representing the three elements of the knowledge triangle), four pilot groups have now been selected, and one of them is the proposal from Uppsala University, BRIDGE. It targets education, research, innovation, and commercialization of research findings in nanomedicine, with a special focus on regenerative medicine.

“This is a hot research field. A few years ago biomaterials were used to repair damage to bodily organs, but today it’s all about regenerating­growing back­the organ on site in the body,” says Håkan Engqvist.

The EU decision brings two years of funding to create and test various models in which research, education, and innovations can be coordinated in a way that makes it possible to exert rigorous control over inputs. Another important area is to find a good solution to issues of ownership and rights to research findings.

“This is of great value to the positioning of Uppsala University in anticipation of coming major EU investments. Here we’ll be able to illuminate the potential created through combinations of our strong research areas, in this case materials research and biological/medical research, and we are beefing up our endeavors to find practical applications for our research,” says Anders Hallberg, vice-chancellor of Uppsala University.

“This is yet another step in our efforts to link Uppsala University’s materials research to industry. This is proof that we are on the right path, and it establishes a valuable international network. What’s more, the project fits in beautifully with our newly launched Key Player Program in collaboration with VINNOVA,” says Lars Jonsson, who directs Uppsala University Innovation.

A key partner in planning and implementing the project is Avedas Innovation Management in Karlsruhe. The other eight parties involved in BRIDGE are Stockholm Science City; INEP from Porto Portugal; University College, London, England; Semmelwies University, Budapest, Hungary; Groningen University Hospital, Holland; BioMade, Groningen, Holland; CEBR, England; Uppsala University­which includes the departments of materials chemistry and engineering sciences along with UU Innovation, which is responsible for the direction of BRIDGE in its entirety.

Anneli Waara | alfa
Further information:
http://www.uu.se

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