Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Ambient Intelligence laboratory

07.05.2003


Today there are evermore intelligent objects, i.e., more devices that adapt to our needs. For example, there is intelligent clothing, intelligent computers, and intelligent household devices such as washing machines, music centres, lamps, and so on.



In fact, it is currently possible for a sensor at the entrance to a dwelling to recognise the voice or the odour of the owner and simultaneously open the door. It is also possible, on entering the house and depending on the mood or physical state of the proprietor, the music centre switches itself on, playing music suitable to the occasion, the lights turn themselves on with greater or lesser intensity and the walls change colour. And all this is done automatically. The devices talk to the owner and already know what language they have to speak as they have been pre-taught.

The term Ambient Intelligence arose in Europe. The European Commission created a group to define what was to be Ambient Intelligence and what applications could it be put to use.
What changes will this new technology bring?


To date we have done everything through reading and writing but, from here on, we propose using all the senses (including smell, hearing, voice and so on). The system of videoconferencing will become quite normal. Also, although currently how the objects are handled has to be learned and thanks to this new technology, it will be nevertheless the objects that will learn how we use them; today the users base themselves on words, tomorrow on contexts.

What is Tekniker doing?

At the European level it is the Philipps company that is developing much of this new technology and, in the United States, the MIT. These two bodies are researching all everyday objects and situations: household devices, cars, the effect of traffic and so on.

The Tekniker Technological Centre wants to focus on the industrial sector and to develop methods to give orders to machines. Thus, from the point of view of safety, the machine will be capable of recognising the operator and at all times tell him/her about which tool has to be used. In some cases the required tool can be supplied to the operator by a robot. Also, the machine will check on the operator’s good working practices such as the wearing of gloves.

The Tekniker project has just begun and will last for two years. The idea for now is to initiate a laboratory. They will use a machining tool, a specialised milling machine to be exact. This machine is currently being used in a conventional manner but, in the future, it will use voice and smell sensors and the operator will wear specialised glasses which will provide him/her with all the necessary information about the machine so that it can be operated more safely. In this way many mistakes can be avoided.

Thanks to electronic noses, there will be the possibility of controlling the quality of the product. If the mixtures of materials are incorrect, the electronic nose will detect an anomalous odour and warn the operator immediately.

The experts working on this project at Tekniker are aware that this technology also has drawbacks. In fact, amongst other things, will be less autonomous and have less privacy. Moreover, it is not advisable that there be too many sensors around the operators as this could interfere with their work. Sociologists are working on the project in order to analyse and provide solutions to these drawbacks.

Fco. Javier García Robles | Basque Research
Further information:
http://www.tekniker.es

More articles from Process Engineering:

nachricht New technology for ultra-smooth polymer films
28.06.2018 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Organische Elektronik, Elektronenstrahl- und Plasmatechnik FEP

nachricht Diamond watch components
18.06.2018 | Schweizerischer Nationalfonds SNF

All articles from Process Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: First evidence on the source of extragalactic particles

For the first time ever, scientists have determined the cosmic origin of highest-energy neutrinos. A research group led by IceCube scientist Elisa Resconi, spokesperson of the Collaborative Research Center SFB1258 at the Technical University of Munich (TUM), provides an important piece of evidence that the particles detected by the IceCube neutrino telescope at the South Pole originate from a galaxy four billion light-years away from Earth.

To rule out other origins with certainty, the team led by neutrino physicist Elisa Resconi from the Technical University of Munich and multi-wavelength...

Im Focus: Magnetic vortices: Two independent magnetic skyrmion phases discovered in a single material

For the first time a team of researchers have discovered two different phases of magnetic skyrmions in a single material. Physicists of the Technical Universities of Munich and Dresden and the University of Cologne can now better study and understand the properties of these magnetic structures, which are important for both basic research and applications.

Whirlpools are an everyday experience in a bath tub: When the water is drained a circular vortex is formed. Typically, such whirls are rather stable. Similar...

Im Focus: Breaking the bond: To take part or not?

Physicists working with Roland Wester at the University of Innsbruck have investigated if and how chemical reactions can be influenced by targeted vibrational excitation of the reactants. They were able to demonstrate that excitation with a laser beam does not affect the efficiency of a chemical exchange reaction and that the excited molecular group acts only as a spectator in the reaction.

A frequently used reaction in organic chemistry is nucleophilic substitution. It plays, for example, an important role in in the synthesis of new chemical...

Im Focus: New 2D Spectroscopy Methods

Optical spectroscopy allows investigating the energy structure and dynamic properties of complex quantum systems. Researchers from the University of Würzburg present two new approaches of coherent two-dimensional spectroscopy.

"Put an excitation into the system and observe how it evolves." According to physicist Professor Tobias Brixner, this is the credo of optical spectroscopy....

Im Focus: Chemical reactions in the light of ultrashort X-ray pulses from free-electron lasers

Ultra-short, high-intensity X-ray flashes open the door to the foundations of chemical reactions. Free-electron lasers generate these kinds of pulses, but there is a catch: the pulses vary in duration and energy. An international research team has now presented a solution: Using a ring of 16 detectors and a circularly polarized laser beam, they can determine both factors with attosecond accuracy.

Free-electron lasers (FELs) generate extremely short and intense X-ray flashes. Researchers can use these flashes to resolve structures with diameters on the...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Leading experts in Diabetes, Metabolism and Biomedical Engineering discuss Precision Medicine

13.07.2018 | Event News

Conference on Laser Polishing – LaP: Fine Tuning for Surfaces

12.07.2018 | Event News

11th European Wood-based Panel Symposium 2018: Meeting point for the wood-based materials industry

03.07.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Leading experts in Diabetes, Metabolism and Biomedical Engineering discuss Precision Medicine

13.07.2018 | Event News

Research finds new molecular structures in boron-based nanoclusters

13.07.2018 | Materials Sciences

Algae Have Land Genes

13.07.2018 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>