Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Sunquakes Reveal The Solar Furnace

31.03.2003


Most people are familiar with the fact that sensitive instruments known as seismographs can detect earthquakes taking place many hundreds or thousands of miles away. By studying the waves from these tremors, scientists can find out about the conditions deep inside our rocky planet.



In the same way, astronomers are now able to measure millions of sound waves that propagate throughout the Sun, causing it to vibrate or ring like a bell. This technique, known as helioseismology, is the solar equivalent of terrestrial seismology.
On Monday 7 April, Dr. John Leibacher (U.S. National Solar Observatory) will highlight recent results from helioseismology studies during a presentation to the UK/Ireland Solar Physics Meeting in Dublin. These will include new views of the rapidly changing “sub-surface solar weather” and the far side of the Sun, as well as prospects for seeing finer and deeper details within the Sun and other stars.

“Unimaginable 25 years ago, helioseismology today allows us to ‘see’ into the otherwise invisible interior of the Sun,” said Dr. Leibacher. “This has enabled us to overthrow some theories, corroborate others, and pose many more new questions as we finally get a glimpse of how things work.



“We are now testing fundamental theories of physics and astrophysics, substantially advancing our knowledge of the Sun’s structure and dynamics,” he added. “We are also beginning to measure significant temporal variations ranging from the scale of the eleven-year solar sunspot cycle right down to ‘solar weather’ variations on the scale of a day.

“Recent observations have been producing some remarkable results on flows of gas that we can image below the surface of the Sun. For example, we are now seeing strong subsurface winds flowing into groups of sunspots, which change from day to day. These sunspots are the sources of the strong magnetic fields which give rise to explosions on the surface. These, in turn, produce all sorts of terrestrial effects, from the aurora borealis, to fluctuations in navigational satellite signals, to power outages, and in the longer term they may influence Earth’s climate.

“With the discovery of these flows, we may be getting close to understanding the real nature of sunspots, with the tantalising prospect of being able to predict their occurrence. We can already utilise helioseismic imaging to detect sunspot groups on the far side of the Sun, before they rotate onto the visible hemisphere.

“It has been an exhilarating ride and we are excited to see what the next turn will reveal,” he said.

Dr. John Leibacher | alfa
Further information:
http://gong.nso.edu
http://sunearth.gsfc.nasa.gov/eclipse/OH/transit03.html
http://.colorado-research.com/~dbraun/farside-gong

More articles from Physics and Astronomy:

nachricht When AI and optoelectronics meet: Researchers take control of light properties
20.11.2018 | Institut national de la recherche scientifique - INRS

nachricht How to melt gold at room temperature
20.11.2018 | Chalmers University of Technology

All articles from Physics and Astronomy >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Nonstop Tranport of Cargo in Nanomachines

Max Planck researchers revel the nano-structure of molecular trains and the reason for smooth transport in cellular antennas.

Moving around, sensing the extracellular environment, and signaling to other cells are important for a cell to function properly. Responsible for those tasks...

Im Focus: UNH scientists help provide first-ever views of elusive energy explosion

Researchers at the University of New Hampshire have captured a difficult-to-view singular event involving "magnetic reconnection"--the process by which sparse particles and energy around Earth collide producing a quick but mighty explosion--in the Earth's magnetotail, the magnetic environment that trails behind the planet.

Magnetic reconnection has remained a bit of a mystery to scientists. They know it exists and have documented the effects that the energy explosions can...

Im Focus: A Chip with Blood Vessels

Biochips have been developed at TU Wien (Vienna), on which tissue can be produced and examined. This allows supplying the tissue with different substances in a very controlled way.

Cultivating human cells in the Petri dish is not a big challenge today. Producing artificial tissue, however, permeated by fine blood vessels, is a much more...

Im Focus: A Leap Into Quantum Technology

Faster and secure data communication: This is the goal of a new joint project involving physicists from the University of Würzburg. The German Federal Ministry of Education and Research funds the project with 14.8 million euro.

In our digital world data security and secure communication are becoming more and more important. Quantum communication is a promising approach to achieve...

Im Focus: Research icebreaker Polarstern begins the Antarctic season

What does it look like below the ice shelf of the calved massive iceberg A68?

On Saturday, 10 November 2018, the research icebreaker Polarstern will leave its homeport of Bremerhaven, bound for Cape Town, South Africa.

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Optical Coherence Tomography: German-Japanese Research Alliance hosted Medical Imaging Conference

19.11.2018 | Event News

“3rd Conference on Laser Polishing – LaP 2018” Attracts International Experts and Users

09.11.2018 | Event News

On the brain’s ability to find the right direction

06.11.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Nonstop Tranport of Cargo in Nanomachines

20.11.2018 | Life Sciences

Researchers find social cultures in chimpanzees

20.11.2018 | Life Sciences

When AI and optoelectronics meet: Researchers take control of light properties

20.11.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>