Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Fatty Liver a Possible Risk for Hypertension

03.11.2005


The accumulation of fat in the liver, or "fatty liver," resulting from accumulation of central body fat, and perhaps not alcohol consumption, may represent an important underlying mechanism for the association between liver enzymes and hypertension.

The study, conducted by researchers at the University at Buffalo, appears in the current issue (November 2005) of the journal Hypertension.

"Our findings extend previous work, and indicate that the association of the liver enzyme GGT with hypertension risk is strongly affected by variation in weight and, above all, body fat distribution," said lead author Saverio Stranges, Ph.D., assistant professor of social and preventive medicine in the UB School of Public Health and Health Professions.



"Specifically, we found that GGT was a significant predictor of hypertension only among overweight participants with increased central body fat.

"If we consider that fatty liver is the most common cause of liver injury in the United States, these findings may have both important clinical and public health implications," said Stranges.

Alcohol consumption initially was thought to be the link between liver enzymes and high blood pressure for several reasons: Alcoholism is a known risk factor for hypertension; the liver enzyme GGT is a marker for alcohol consumption, and GGT also has been associated with hypertension.

In addition, chronic liver disease, in which GGT levels can be increased, often is associated with heavy alcohol consumption or actual alcoholism.

However, this study showed that the accumulation of fat in the liver, or "fatty liver" (in this case non-alcoholic fatty liver) in study participants with increased central body fat may be the important underlying mechanism linking GGT and hypertension. The association was found in nondrinkers as well as drinkers.

The study involved 1,455 participants who took part in the Western New York Health Study. A number of measures were taken at baseline, including GGT, blood pressure, weight, abdominal height and size of waistline.

At the six-year follow-up, participants were divided into five groups according to their baseline GGT levels. The baseline measurements were repeated, and participants completed questionnaires concerning lifestyle and health habits, including alcohol use.

Fatty liver has no symptoms, but it can develop into the chronic conditions of hepatitis or cirrhosis.

Stranges said these findings suggest that fatty liver should be considered part of the metabolic syndrome, a cluster of conditions physicians use to help assess a patient’s risk for cardiovascular disease.

Persons with any three of the conditions are considered at high risk. Conditions currently included in the metabolic syndrome are abdominal obesity, low HDL cholesterol, high blood sugar, high blood pressure and high triglycerides.

Stranges and colleagues are now studying the association between liver enzymes and diabetes.

Additional contributors to the research were Maurizio Trevisan, M.D., professor and dean of the School of Public Health and Professions, along with Joan M. Dorn, Ph.D., Jacek Dmochowski, Ph.D., and Richard Donahue, Ph.D., all of the UB Department of Social and Preventive Medicine.

The study was supported in part by a grant to Donahue from the National Institutes of Health.

The University at Buffalo is a premier research-intensive public university, the largest and most comprehensive campus in the State University of New York.

Lois Baker | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.buffalo.edu

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Purdue cancer identity technology makes it easier to find a tumor's 'address'
16.11.2018 | Purdue University

nachricht Microgel powder fights infection and helps wounds heal
14.11.2018 | Michigan Technological University

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: UNH scientists help provide first-ever views of elusive energy explosion

Researchers at the University of New Hampshire have captured a difficult-to-view singular event involving "magnetic reconnection"--the process by which sparse particles and energy around Earth collide producing a quick but mighty explosion--in the Earth's magnetotail, the magnetic environment that trails behind the planet.

Magnetic reconnection has remained a bit of a mystery to scientists. They know it exists and have documented the effects that the energy explosions can...

Im Focus: A Chip with Blood Vessels

Biochips have been developed at TU Wien (Vienna), on which tissue can be produced and examined. This allows supplying the tissue with different substances in a very controlled way.

Cultivating human cells in the Petri dish is not a big challenge today. Producing artificial tissue, however, permeated by fine blood vessels, is a much more...

Im Focus: A Leap Into Quantum Technology

Faster and secure data communication: This is the goal of a new joint project involving physicists from the University of Würzburg. The German Federal Ministry of Education and Research funds the project with 14.8 million euro.

In our digital world data security and secure communication are becoming more and more important. Quantum communication is a promising approach to achieve...

Im Focus: Research icebreaker Polarstern begins the Antarctic season

What does it look like below the ice shelf of the calved massive iceberg A68?

On Saturday, 10 November 2018, the research icebreaker Polarstern will leave its homeport of Bremerhaven, bound for Cape Town, South Africa.

Im Focus: Penn engineers develop ultrathin, ultralight 'nanocardboard'

When choosing materials to make something, trade-offs need to be made between a host of properties, such as thickness, stiffness and weight. Depending on the application in question, finding just the right balance is the difference between success and failure

Now, a team of Penn Engineers has demonstrated a new material they call "nanocardboard," an ultrathin equivalent of corrugated paper cardboard. A square...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

“3rd Conference on Laser Polishing – LaP 2018” Attracts International Experts and Users

09.11.2018 | Event News

On the brain’s ability to find the right direction

06.11.2018 | Event News

European Space Talks: Weltraumschrott – eine Gefahr für die Gesellschaft?

23.10.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Purdue cancer identity technology makes it easier to find a tumor's 'address'

16.11.2018 | Health and Medicine

Good preparation is half the digestion

16.11.2018 | Life Sciences

Microscope measures muscle weakness

16.11.2018 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>