Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Lifestyle Changes Especially Effective at Preventing Type 2 Diabetes in Adults Aged 60 and Older

20.01.2005


New Awareness Campaign Says "It’s Not Too Late" to Prevent the Disease



About 40 percent of adults ages 40 to 74 – or 41 million people - have pre-diabetes, a condition that raises a person’s risk for developing type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and stroke. Studies show that while adults over 60 are at increased risk for type 2 diabetes, losing a small amount of weight and increasing physical activity is especially effective in reducing that risk among this age group.

To spread the word that diabetes prevention for older adults is proven and possible, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ ( HHS ) National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP) launched a public awareness campaign today called “It’s Not Too Late to Prevent Diabetes. Take Your First Step Today” at the Yates Family YMCA in Jacksonville, Florida. The campaign delivers the message that type 2 diabetes can be prevented or delayed.


“It’s Not Too Late to Prevent Diabetes” is part of NDEP’s Small Steps. Big Rewards. Prevent type 2 Diabetes campaign that targets groups at high risk for diabetes. Tailored specifically for older adults, “It’s Not Too Late…” encourages adults over 60 that modest lifestyle changes can yield big rewards in preventing or delaying the onset of type 2 diabetes.

“We are asking older adults to find out if they are at risk for type 2 diabetes, and we’re showing them how to take action to prevent it,” said Dr. James R. Gavin III, Chair of the NDEP. “Older adults may not realize that they still have time to prevent diabetes, or that diabetes prevention is even possible. That’s why the ‘It’s Not Too Late’ campaign is so important.”

HHS’ Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP), a recent study involving Americans from all over the country, showed that type 2 diabetes can be delayed or even prevented by losing a small amount of weight by following a low-fat, low-calorie meal plan and getting 30 minutes of physical activity five times per week. These lifestyle interventions worked particularly well in people aged 60 and older, reducing the development of diabetes by 71 percent.

Florida native Sam Kitching participated in the campaign launch as a member of NDEP’s Small Steps. Big Rewards. Team to Prevent type 2 Diabetes. This group of committed citizens was assembled by NDEP to put a human face on the populations that are at high risk for the disease. Each member is actively working in his or her community to demonstrate lifestyle changes they have made to prevent or delay diabetes.

“I adopted a healthy lifestyle and made the commitment to inform my family and friends that it’s not too late for people my age to prevent type 2 diabetes,” said Mr. Kitching. “Even small steps, like eating healthier foods and taking an afternoon walk can make a big difference,” he said.

The “It’s Not Too Late to Prevent Diabetes” campaign includes radio and print public service advertisements, tip sheets, and posters. Materials are also available on the NDEP website at www.ndep.nih.gov.

“The YMCA of Florida’s First Coast is proud to be hosting the national launch of this important public health campaign,” said Thomas “Trigg” Wilkes, CEO. “We are the community’s source for programs and activities that encourage people to enjoy a healthy lifestyle, and we wholeheartedly support the goals for the ‘It’s Not Too Late’ campaign.”

For more information about the diabetes prevention campaign, free materials, tip sheets, and the GAMEPLAN for Preventing type 2 Diabetes, which contains tools to help people lose weight, get active, and track their progress, visit the NDEP website at www.ndep.nih.gov or call 1-800-438-5383.

TaWanna Berry | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.nih.gov
http://www.FirstCoastYMCA.org

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Study tracks inner workings of the brain with new biosensor
16.08.2018 | Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn

nachricht Foods of the future
15.08.2018 | Georg-August-Universität Göttingen

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Color effects from transparent 3D-printed nanostructures

New design tool automatically creates nanostructure 3D-print templates for user-given colors
Scientists present work at prestigious SIGGRAPH conference

Most of the objects we see are colored by pigments, but using pigments has disadvantages: such colors can fade, industrial pigments are often toxic, and...

Im Focus: Unraveling the nature of 'whistlers' from space in the lab

A new study sheds light on how ultralow frequency radio waves and plasmas interact

Scientists at the University of California, Los Angeles present new research on a curious cosmic phenomenon known as "whistlers" -- very low frequency packets...

Im Focus: New interactive machine learning tool makes car designs more aerodynamic

Scientists develop first tool to use machine learning methods to compute flow around interactively designable 3D objects. Tool will be presented at this year’s prestigious SIGGRAPH conference.

When engineers or designers want to test the aerodynamic properties of the newly designed shape of a car, airplane, or other object, they would normally model...

Im Focus: Robots as 'pump attendants': TU Graz develops robot-controlled rapid charging system for e-vehicles

Researchers from TU Graz and their industry partners have unveiled a world first: the prototype of a robot-controlled, high-speed combined charging system (CCS) for electric vehicles that enables series charging of cars in various parking positions.

Global demand for electric vehicles is forecast to rise sharply: by 2025, the number of new vehicle registrations is expected to reach 25 million per year....

Im Focus: The “TRiC” to folding actin

Proteins must be folded correctly to fulfill their molecular functions in cells. Molecular assistants called chaperones help proteins exploit their inbuilt folding potential and reach the correct three-dimensional structure. Researchers at the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry (MPIB) have demonstrated that actin, the most abundant protein in higher developed cells, does not have the inbuilt potential to fold and instead requires special assistance to fold into its active state. The chaperone TRiC uses a previously undescribed mechanism to perform actin folding. The study was recently published in the journal Cell.

Actin is the most abundant protein in highly developed cells and has diverse functions in processes like cell stabilization, cell division and muscle...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

LaserForum 2018 deals with 3D production of components

17.08.2018 | Event News

Within reach of the Universe

08.08.2018 | Event News

A journey through the history of microscopy – new exhibition opens at the MDC

27.07.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Smallest transistor worldwide switches current with a single atom in solid electrolyte

17.08.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

Robots as Tools and Partners in Rehabilitation

17.08.2018 | Information Technology

Climate Impact Research in Hannover: Small Plants against Large Waves

17.08.2018 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>