Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Cottonseed Drug Boosts Cancer Treatment in Mice

04.10.2004


A drug refined from cottonseed oil and previously tried and abandoned as a male contraceptive could boost the effectiveness of treatment for prostate cancer and possibly other common cancers as well, according to new research from the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center.

Results of the study will be reported Oct. 1 at the Symposium on Molecular Targets and Cancer Therapeutics in Geneva, Switzerland. The symposium is sponsored by the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer, the National Cancer Institute and the American Association for Cancer Research.

The U-M team demonstrated that a potential small molecule inhibitor of Bcl-2/xL proteins can boost the effectiveness of radiation therapy and chemotherapy. The researchers showed that the molecule, (-)-gossypol (minus gossypol), inhibited the function of Bcl-2/xL and made the cancer more sensitive to radiation therapy in human prostate tumors in mice.



The study demonstrates for the first time that (-)-gossypol enhances the anti-tumor efficacy of radiation therapy both in vitro and in vivo with increased induction of apoptosis, or programmed cell death. “The significance of this is that anti-apoptotic proteins Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL are over expressed in many cancers, making them resistant to drug and radiation treatment. So, it is not just prostate cancer that our findings are relevant to, but also other cancers with BcL-2/xL expression, such as those of the lung, breast, ovary, pancreas, skin, brain and head and neck, where (-)-gossypol may also sensitize cancer cells to chemotherapy or radiation,” says Liang Xu, M.D., Ph.D., research assistant professor in hematology and oncology at the U-M Medical School, who will present the study in Geneva.

Based on the cell and animal data, the (-)-gossypol form of the drug was likely to be more active than the same doses of natural gossypol used in previous studies. Furthermore, their cell and animal data show that (-)-gossypol would make radiation and chemotherapy more powerful and overcome the resistance to drug and radiation treatment caused by high levels of Bcl-2/xL.

Gossypol was researched as a male contraceptive in China as long ago as 1929, but after large scale studies in the 1970s it was abandoned because some men remained infertile after stopping treatment. There were plans in Brazil in the 1990s to market the drug but these were shelved. In 1998 the World Health Organization said research on its use for contraception should be abandoned.

Gossypol is not the first drug investigated as a contraceptive to find a potential role in treating cancer. Tamoxifen was first developed as a female contraceptive and failed, only to become the world’s most successful breast cancer drug.

Will gossypol follow in the footsteps of tamoxifen? “There is a lot of research still to do, but we certainly hope so,” Xu says. “The natural form of gossypol has been extensively tested in humans and is well tolerated for long-term use. If we use the more active form, (-)-gossypol, correctly and wisely – for example, in combination with radiation or chemotherapy – gossypol may soon find its new role in our fight against cancer.”

Xu says he hopes to see the findings clinically tested soon and a Phase I trial is planned.

The research team is led by Marc Lippman, M.D., John G. Searle Professor and chair of internal medicine, and Shaomeng Wang, Ph.D., associate professor of internal medicine and co-director of the U-M Comprehensive Cancer Center Experimental Therapeutics Program, in collaboration with Theodore Lawrence, M.D., Ph.D., Isadore Lampe Professor and chair of Radiation Oncology.

Funding for the study was from the U.S. Department of Defense and the National Cancer Institute.

| newswise
Further information:
http://www.med.umich.edu

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht UC San Diego researchers develop sensors to detect and measure cancer's ability to spread
06.12.2018 | University of California - San Diego

nachricht New cancer immunotherapy approach turns immune cells into tiny anti-tumor drug factories
05.12.2018 | University of California - San Diego

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Researchers develop method to transfer entire 2D circuits to any smooth surface

What if a sensor sensing a thing could be part of the thing itself? Rice University engineers believe they have a two-dimensional solution to do just that.

Rice engineers led by materials scientists Pulickel Ajayan and Jun Lou have developed a method to make atom-flat sensors that seamlessly integrate with devices...

Im Focus: Three components on one chip

Scientists at the University of Stuttgart and the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) succeed in important further development on the way to quantum Computers.

Quantum computers one day should be able to solve certain computing problems much faster than a classical computer. One of the most promising approaches is...

Im Focus: Substitute for rare earth metal oxides

New Project SNAPSTER: Novel luminescent materials by encapsulating phosphorescent metal clusters with organic liquid crystals

Nowadays energy conversion in lighting and optoelectronic devices requires the use of rare earth oxides.

Im Focus: A bit of a stretch... material that thickens as it's pulled

Scientists have discovered the first synthetic material that becomes thicker - at the molecular level - as it is stretched.

Researchers led by Dr Devesh Mistry from the University of Leeds discovered a new non-porous material that has unique and inherent "auxetic" stretching...

Im Focus: The force of the vacuum

Scientists from the Theory Department of the Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter (MPSD) at the Center for Free-Electron Laser Science (CFEL) in Hamburg have shown through theoretical calculations and computer simulations that the force between electrons and lattice distortions in an atomically thin two-dimensional superconductor can be controlled with virtual photons. This could aid the development of new superconductors for energy-saving devices and many other technical applications.

The vacuum is not empty. It may sound like magic to laypeople but it has occupied physicists since the birth of quantum mechanics.

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

EGU 2019 meeting: Media registration now open

06.12.2018 | Event News

Expert Panel on the Future of HPC in Engineering

03.12.2018 | Event News

Inaugural "Virtual World Tour" scheduled for december

28.11.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

A new molecular player involved in T cell activation

07.12.2018 | Life Sciences

High-temperature electronics? That's hot

07.12.2018 | Materials Sciences

Supercomputers without waste heat

07.12.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>