Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

PET imaging tracks Zika virus infection, disease progression in mouse model

20.09.2017

For the first time, scientists have used Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging to study brain inflammation following Zika virus infection in mice, according to a study recently published online in the journal Molecular Imaging and Biology. The technology has the added benefit of allowing investigators to study the progression of the disease over time.

Small-animal imaging has become an important research tool for preclinical studies of infectious diseases, according to senior author Thomas M. Bocan, Ph.D., of the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID).


Bottom row: The image shows representative PET/CT mouse brain images at days 3, 6 and 10 post-infection with Zika virus. Red area indicates neuroinflammation. Top row: Image represents PBS control mouse brain images.

Image courtesy of US Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases

"Traditional methods of infectious disease research using animal models have provided limited information about disease progression until the study's endpoint, when investigators could analyze tissues from those animals," he said. "Imaging studies allow us to gather enhanced information through longitudinal studies of the same animal during the course of the infection."

Zika virus was initially identified in monkeys in Uganda in 1947, with the first human case detected in 1952, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). The disease gained international attention in May 2015 when it began to spread throughout the Americas.

While the virus is primarily transmitted to people through the bite of an infected mosquito, sexual transmission is also possible. Zika virus infection during pregnancy has been linked to congenital brain abnormalities, including microcephaly, and Zika virus is a trigger of Guillain-Barré syndrome.

Continuing research to investigate the link between Zika virus and a range of neurological disorders requires a better understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms causing severe disease. PET is a highly sensitive molecular imaging technique that can be used to visualize a variety of biological processes in live animal models. The USAMRIID team therefore set out to evaluate the ability and sensitivity of PET imaging, using a probe called [18F]DPA-714 to detect and quantify neuroinflammation in Zika virus-infected mice.

As described in the paper, they found that levels of Zika virus in the mouse brain increased from day 3 to day 10 post-infection. Over this span, the mice also showed a 2- to 6-fold increase in global brain neuroinflammation using [18F]DPA-714 PET imaging.

The work highlights the significant role played by global neuroinflammation in the progression of Zika virus infection. In addition, it demonstrates, for the first time, the ability of [18F]DPA-714 PET imaging to detect and quantify Zika virus-related neuroinflammation disseminated throughout the brains of infected mice.

Noninvasive imaging using PET and other technologies reduces the number of animals in a study by permitting the use of animals as their own controls, according to the authors. In addition, therapeutic agents can be developed and tested using imaging technologies that are directly translatable to the clinic.

"The future is bright for the application of imaging in infectious diseases," said Bocan. "Measures of virus and bacteria distribution and the consequences of infection can be assessed in real time in the same subject. In addition, treatment with countermeasures can be evaluated with a better understanding of the state of disease progression."

###

USAMRIID's mission is to provide leading edge medical capabilities to deter and defend against current and emerging biological threat agents. Research conducted at USAMRIID leads to medical solutions--vaccines, drugs, diagnostics, and information--that benefit both military personnel and civilians. The Institute plays a key role as the lead military medical research laboratory for the Defense Threat Reduction Agency's Joint Science and Technology Office for Chemical and Biological Defense. USAMRIID is a subordinate laboratory of the U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command. For more information, visit http://www.usamriid.army.mil.

Reference: [18F]DPA-714 PET imaging reveals global neuroinflammation in Zika virus infected mice. Kyle Kuszpit, Bradley S. Hollidge, Xiankun Zeng, Robert G. Stafford, Sharon Daye, Xiang Zhang, Falguni Basuli, Joseph W. Golden, Rolf E. Swenson, Darci R. Smith, Thomas M. Bocan. Molecular Imaging and Biology. DOI: 10.1007/s11307-017-1118-2

Funding: This study was supported by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA).

Media Contact

Caree Vander Linden
teresa.l.vanderlinden.civ@mail.mil
301-619-2285

http://www.usamriid.army.mil 

Caree Vander Linden | EurekAlert!

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Bioinspired nanoscale drug delivery method developed by WSU, PNNL researchers
10.01.2019 | Washington State University

nachricht How herpesviruses shape the immune system
09.01.2019 | German Center for Infection Research

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Flying Optical Cats for Quantum Communication

Dead and alive at the same time? Researchers at the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics have implemented Erwin Schrödinger’s paradoxical gedanken experiment employing an entangled atom-light state.

In 1935 Erwin Schrödinger formulated a thought experiment designed to capture the paradoxical nature of quantum physics. The crucial element of this gedanken...

Im Focus: Nanocellulose for novel implants: Ears from the 3D-printer

Cellulose obtained from wood has amazing material properties. Empa researchers are now equipping the biodegradable material with additional functionalities to produce implants for cartilage diseases using 3D printing.

It all starts with an ear. Empa researcher Michael Hausmann removes the object shaped like a human ear from the 3D printer and explains:

Im Focus: Elucidating the Atomic Mechanism of Superlubricity

The phenomenon of so-called superlubricity is known, but so far the explanation at the atomic level has been missing: for example, how does extremely low friction occur in bearings? Researchers from the Fraunhofer Institutes IWM and IWS jointly deciphered a universal mechanism of superlubricity for certain diamond-like carbon layers in combination with organic lubricants. Based on this knowledge, it is now possible to formulate design rules for supra lubricating layer-lubricant combinations. The results are presented in an article in Nature Communications, volume 10.

One of the most important prerequisites for sustainable and environmentally friendly mobility is minimizing friction. Research and industry have been dedicated...

Im Focus: Mission completed – EU partners successfully test new technologies for space robots in Morocco

Just in time for Christmas, a Mars-analogue mission in Morocco, coordinated by the Robotics Innovation Center of the German Research Center for Artificial Intelligence (DFKI) as part of the SRC project FACILITATORS, has been successfully completed. SRC, the Strategic Research Cluster on Space Robotics Technologies, is a program of the European Union to support research and development in space technologies. From mid-November to mid-December 2018, a team of more than 30 scientists from 11 countries tested technologies for future exploration of Mars and Moon in the desert of the Maghreb state.

Close to the border with Algeria, the Erfoud region in Morocco – known to tourists for its impressive sand dunes – offered ideal conditions for the four-week...

Im Focus: Programming light on a chip

Research opens doors in photonic quantum information processing, optical signal processing and microwave photonics

Researchers from the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) have developed a new integrated photonics platform that can...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Our digital society in 2040

16.01.2019 | Event News

11th International Symposium: “Advanced Battery Power – Kraftwerk Batterie” Aachen, 3-4 April 2019

14.01.2019 | Event News

ICTM Conference 2019: Digitization emerges as an engineering trend for turbomachinery construction

12.12.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Artificially produced cells communicate with each other: Models of life

17.01.2019 | Life Sciences

Velcro for human cells

16.01.2019 | Life Sciences

Kiel physicists discover new effect in the interaction of plasmas with solids

16.01.2019 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>