Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Once invincible superbug squashed by 'superteam' of antibiotics

22.08.2017

UB researchers use antibiotics combination to kill the first strain of highly resistant E. coli in the United States

The golden age of antibiotics may be drawing to a close.


A novel combination of aztreonam, amikacin and polymyxin B was able to kill E. coli carrying mcr-1 and ndm-5 -- genes that make the bacterium immune to last-resort antibiotics.

Credit: University at Buffalo

The recent discovery of E. coli carrying mcr-1 and ndm-5 -- genes that make the bacterium immune to last-resort antibiotics -- has left clinicians without an effective means of treatment for the superbug.

But in a new study, University at Buffalo researchers have assembled a team of three antibiotics that, together, are capable of eradicating the deadly bacterium. The groundbreaking research was recently published in mBio, a journal for the American Society of Microbiology.

The researchers found that a novel combination of aztreonam, amikacin and polymyxin B -- a last-resort antibiotic -- was able to kill E. coli carrying mcr-1 and ndm-5 genes within 24 hours while also preventing regrowth. Traditional combinations of these antibiotics were unable to kill the E. coli and resulted in rapid resistance.

"The threat of gram-negative bacteria, including E. coli carrying mcr-1, is worrisome," says Zackery Bulman, PharmD, first author on the study, a graduate and former postdoctoral fellow at the UB School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences who is now an assistant professor at the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Pharmacy.

"We believe that the appearance of mcr-1 and ndm-5 in patients may be a harbinger for what is to come. The golden era of antibiotics isn't over yet, but we wanted to help clinicians prepare therapeutically for the occurrence of these strains."

Brian Tsuji, PharmD, principal investigator and associate professor in the School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, continued: "That is why the mcr-1 and ndm-5 strains represent an urgent threat, because of the high-degree of resistance combined with the potential for rapid spread in the community setting. We had to work quickly and think outside of the box, beyond traditional antibiotic combinations."

"This is the first study to propose therapeutic solutions with three drugs against superbugs harboring mcr-1 and ndm-5. The results will help prepare clinicians for future occurrences of these pathogens."

Fewer than two dozen cases of E. coli carrying mcr-1 have been reported in the U.S. However, with additional cases reported worldwide, the bacteria's immunity to available antibiotics has left the medical community vulnerable to a massive outbreak of infections.

The rapid increase in antibiotic-resistant bacteria has resurrected the importance of polymyxins, a class of antibiotics that are effective but employed as a last resort because of the damage they can cause to the kidneys.

To avoid prescribing high dosages of polymyxins and to make up for the antibiotic's weaknesses, the researchers decided to turn to new dosing strategies and multiple antibiotic combinations.

After conducting studies on dozens of combinations of more than 15 antibiotics paired with polymyxin B, the researchers discovered two effective treatments. Combinations of polymyxin B with either aztreonam or amikacin resulted in undetectable bacterial counts after 24 hours.

The E. coli, however, was able to regrow to initial levels after 96 hours and a subpopulation of amikacin-resistant strains arose after 10 days when exposed to the combination of polymyxin B and amikacin. Polymyxin B and aztreonam pushed the E. coli into a persistent but nonreplicating state. Only the triple combination eliminated the E. coli strain and prevented regrowth.

"We knew that polymyxins alone couldn't work. Only the three drugs combined were able to work synergistically to suppress and kill the bacteria," says Bulman. "We overcame the bacteria by pushing it as far as possible with an agent that it was resistant to while simultaneously administering two other antibiotics."

The promising finding may provide a viable treatment against mcr-1 and ndm-5 strains.

The research was funded through a $4.4 million National Institutes of Health (NIH) grant awarded to Tsuji to develop new dosing regimens for polymyxins.

Media Contact

Marcene Robinson
marcener@buffalo.edu
716-645-4595

 @UBNewsSource

http://www.buffalo.edu 

Marcene Robinson | EurekAlert!

Further reports about: E coli antibiotic antibiotics bacterium strains superbug

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Scientists find new approach that shows promise for treating cystic fibrosis
14.03.2019 | NIH/National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute

nachricht Lab grown ‘brains’ successfully model disease
13.03.2019 | Max-Planck-Institut für Psychiatrie

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Revealing the secret of the vacuum for the first time

New research group at the University of Jena combines theory and experiment to demonstrate for the first time certain physical processes in a quantum vacuum

For most people, a vacuum is an empty space. Quantum physics, on the other hand, assumes that even in this lowest-energy state, particles and antiparticles...

Im Focus: Sussex scientists one step closer to a clock that could replace GPS and Galileo

Physicists in the EPic Lab at University of Sussex make crucial development in global race to develop a portable atomic clock

Scientists in the Emergent Photonics Lab (EPic Lab) at the University of Sussex have made a breakthrough to a crucial element of an atomic clock - devices...

Im Focus: Sensing shakes

A new way to sense earthquakes could help improve early warning systems

Every year earthquakes worldwide claim hundreds or even thousands of lives. Forewarning allows people to head for safety and a matter of seconds could spell...

Im Focus: A thermo-sensor for magnetic bits

New concept for energy-efficient data processing technology

Scientists of the Department of Physics at the University of Hamburg, Germany, detected the magnetic states of atoms on a surface using only heat. The...

Im Focus: The moiré patterns of three layers change the electronic properties of graphene

Combining an atomically thin graphene and a boron nitride layer at a slightly rotated angle changes their electrical properties. Physicists at the University of Basel have now shown for the first time the combination with a third layer can result in new material properties also in a three-layer sandwich of carbon and boron nitride. This significantly increases the number of potential synthetic materials, report the researchers in the scientific journal Nano Letters.

Last year, researchers in the US caused a big stir when they showed that rotating two stacked graphene layers by a “magical” angle of 1.1 degrees turns...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

International Modelica Conference with 330 visitors from 21 countries at OTH Regensburg

11.03.2019 | Event News

Selection Completed: 580 Young Scientists from 88 Countries at the Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting

01.03.2019 | Event News

LightMAT 2019 – 3rd International Conference on Light Materials – Science and Technology

28.02.2019 | Event News

 
Latest News

How heavy elements come about in the universe

18.03.2019 | Physics and Astronomy

Robot arms with the flexibility of an elephant’s trunk

18.03.2019 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Microbes can grow on nitric oxide (NO)

18.03.2019 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>