Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Research marks giant step in potential of using stem cells to treat human disorders

20.05.2005


Nuclear transfer yields immune-matched human embryonic stem cell lines from patients with spinal cord injury, juvenile diabetes and immune deficiency

Research from the Republic of Korea’s Seoul National University published in this week’s edition of Science represents a major advance in the science of using stem cells to repair damage caused by human disease and injury, according to Gerald Schatten, Ph.D., professor and vice chair of research development in the department of obstetrics, gynecology and reproductive sciences at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and a co-author on the Korean study.

"What the study shows is that stem cells can be made that are specific to patients regardless of age or sex and that these cells are identical genetic matches to the donor," said Dr. Schatten, who also is director of the Pittsburgh Development Center (PDC) at the Magee-Womens Research Institute and a professor of cell biology and physiology at the School of Medicine. "If they can be safely used in transplant, the promise for effective treatment – perhaps even cure – of devastating diseases and injuries comes within reach."



Researchers led by Woo Suk Hwang, D.V.M., Ph.D., professor at Seoul National University, previously made history when they announced the first successful cloning of a human embryonic stem cell line in February 2004 at the American Association for the Advancement of Science meeting in Seattle. Dr. Hwang and his colleagues have since refined their techniques, making astonishing progress in just one year, said Dr. Schatten, who acted as an advisor to the Korean lab for the purposes of data analysis, interpretation and preparation of an English-language manuscript on the landmark study.

As Dr. Hwang and his colleagues report, 18 women donated 185 eggs specifically for research purposes at Hanyang University Hospital in Seoul. Of these, 125 came from 10 women under the age of 30. To obtain somatic cells, the researchers recruited 11 donors, who included males and females ranging in age from 2 to 56. In the case of minors, parental consent was obtained. A somatic cell is any cell in the body other than sperm or egg cells. Among somatic cell donors were individuals who had juvenile diabetes, spinal cord injury and a genetic immune deficiency called congenital hypogammaglobulinemia, which can lead to an increased risk of infections.

Using these resources, 11 lines of human embryonic stem cells were derived through nuclear transfer. Somatic cells used from donor patients were grown from skin biopsies. These 11 lines were established from 31 artificially engineered cell constructs created by nuclear transfer. An average of 17 eggs were used for each stem cell line.

Neither sex nor age of the nuclear donor appeared to influence success in deriving embryonic stem cell lines. However, eggs donated by younger women showed a higher rate of success than those from older women. Among egg donors under 30, an average of less than 14 eggs were used to generate a stem cell line.

"This research is doubly important because it shows that efficient patient-specific cellular models of human disease can be developed and studied with more precision than ever before," said Dr. Schatten, whose own cloning work is confined to non-human primates. "With the promise of curing devastating disease and reversing injuries that cause so much human suffering, isn’t it a moral obligation for scientists to continue this avenue of research responsibly?"

Dedicated to sound and responsible medical research and collaboration, the Pittsburgh Development Center of Magee-Womens Research Institute explores the molecular biology of cell function to determine the origins of developmental diseases, the causes and prevention of adverse pregnancy outcomes and the potential of stem cells for treating human disease.

Among its other strengths, the PDC is emerging as a world center for the study of stem cells, which are precursor cells with the ability to grow into any tissue and have the capability for treating a variety of human diseases. Before stem cell treatments are developed, PDC researchers will determine the best conditions in which to grow these precious cells. PDC researchers will demonstrate their safety and effectiveness in the laboratory before patients receive stem cell treatments.

Michele D. Baum | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.pdc.magee.edu
http://www.upmc.edu

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Zebrafish's near 360 degree UV-vision knocks stripes off Google Street View
22.06.2018 | University of Sussex

nachricht New cellular pathway helps explain how inflammation leads to artery disease
22.06.2018 | Cedars-Sinai Medical Center

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Superconducting vortices quantize ordinary metal

Russian researchers together with their French colleagues discovered that a genuine feature of superconductors -- quantum Abrikosov vortices of supercurrent -- can also exist in an ordinary nonsuperconducting metal put into contact with a superconductor. The observation of these vortices provides direct evidence of induced quantum coherence. The pioneering experimental observation was supported by a first-ever numerical model that describes the induced vortices in finer detail.

These fundamental results, published in the journal Nature Communications, enable a better understanding and description of the processes occurring at the...

Im Focus: Temperature-controlled fiber-optic light source with liquid core

In a recent publication in the renowned journal Optica, scientists of Leibniz-Institute of Photonic Technology (Leibniz IPHT) in Jena showed that they can accurately control the optical properties of liquid-core fiber lasers and therefore their spectral band width by temperature and pressure tuning.

Already last year, the researchers provided experimental proof of a new dynamic of hybrid solitons– temporally and spectrally stationary light waves resulting...

Im Focus: Overdosing on Calcium

Nano crystals impact stem cell fate during bone formation

Scientists from the University of Freiburg and the University of Basel identified a master regulator for bone regeneration. Prasad Shastri, Professor of...

Im Focus: AchemAsia 2019 will take place in Shanghai

Moving into its fourth decade, AchemAsia is setting out for new horizons: The International Expo and Innovation Forum for Sustainable Chemical Production will take place from 21-23 May 2019 in Shanghai, China. With an updated event profile, the eleventh edition focusses on topics that are especially relevant for the Chinese process industry, putting a strong emphasis on sustainability and innovation.

Founded in 1989 as a spin-off of ACHEMA to cater to the needs of China’s then developing industry, AchemAsia has since grown into a platform where the latest...

Im Focus: First real-time test of Li-Fi utilization for the industrial Internet of Things

The BMBF-funded OWICELLS project was successfully completed with a final presentation at the BMW plant in Munich. The presentation demonstrated a Li-Fi communication with a mobile robot, while the robot carried out usual production processes (welding, moving and testing parts) in a 5x5m² production cell. The robust, optical wireless transmission is based on spatial diversity; in other words, data is sent and received simultaneously by several LEDs and several photodiodes. The system can transmit data at more than 100 Mbit/s and five milliseconds latency.

Modern production technologies in the automobile industry must become more flexible in order to fulfil individual customer requirements.

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Munich conference on asteroid detection, tracking and defense

13.06.2018 | Event News

2nd International Baltic Earth Conference in Denmark: “The Baltic Sea region in Transition”

08.06.2018 | Event News

ISEKI_Food 2018: Conference with Holistic View of Food Production

05.06.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Rapid water formation in diffuse interstellar clouds

25.06.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

Using tree-fall patterns to calculate tornado wind speed

25.06.2018 | Earth Sciences

'Stealth' material hides hot objects from infrared eyes

25.06.2018 | Power and Electrical Engineering

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>