Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

A rail system allows child seat to be simply attached to the wheelchair

06.11.2019

Taking a child along in a wheelchair is not an easy task for people with walking disabilities. Within the framework of several student projects, young engineers at Technische Universität Kaiserslautern (TUK) have dealt with this topic. In the meantime, the team has developed a prototype in which a child seat can simply be attached to a wheelchair using a rail system. The seat can be adjusted to any position with only very little effort. At the medical technology trade fair “Medica” from 18 to 21 November in Düsseldorf, the team will present the technology at the research stand Rhineland Palatinate (Hall 7a, Stand B06).

The rail system, which curves around the wheelchair, resembles a bicycle frame. A child seat can be attached to it in a few simple steps. "The seat can be brought into any position via a rotary lever," explains engineer Michael Weber from the Institute for Mechanical and Automotive Design at TUK.


The seat can be adjusted to any position with only very little effort.

Credit: Koziel/TUK


Michael Weber (left) and Johannes Imhoff will present the technology at the fair.

Credit: Koziel/TUK

This allows the driver of the wheel chair to place a child directly in the seat in a few easy steps, when the seat is to his or her right. Afterwards he or she can position the seat behind the wheelchair using a rotary lever. Thus the child seat does not negatively influence the overall width.

In 2016, the Department of Mechanical and Process Engineering came up with the idea for this work for a wheelchair user who had not been able to find a solution to transport her child safely in a wheelchair with any supplier.

As part of the so-called Idea Project in the Mechanical Engineering degree programme, student teams then dealt with this topic and designed various conceptual 3D models. This project work is offered early on in the Bachelor's programme and aims to enable students to engage in practical teamwork at the beginning of their studies.

Student Johannes Imhoff then continued working on one of the models as part of his Bachelor's thesis. Michael Weber and Hristo Apostolov from the Institute for Virtual Product Development supervised him. In the meantime, Johannes has turned it into a prototype and improved the technology.

The system manufactured by the central metal workshops and set up in the workshop of the institute consists of a thin-walled pipe system and is therefore relatively light. The mounting system with which the child seat can be locked in place is comparable to a bicycle carrier for trailer couplings.

It is designed for seats from nine to 13 kilograms as well as for 15 and more kilograms. "All in all, we made sure that the technology was easy to use and that a child could be seated in the seat without much effort," says Imhoff.

They will present their work at the fair. "We hope to spark the interest of companies and show them that the idea works," says Professor Dr Roman Teutsch, who heads the Institute for Mechanical and Automotive Design. Perhaps the prototype could in future become a product that helps disabled people to take their children with them easily and independently.

Klaus Dosch, Department of Technology and Innovation, is organizing the presentation of the researchers of the TU Kaiserslautern at the fair. He is the contact partner for companies and, among other things, establishes contacts to science.
Contact: Klaus Dosch, Email: dosch[at]rti.uni-kl.de, Phone (also during the fair): +49 631 205-3001

Wissenschaftliche Ansprechpartner:

Michael Weber
Institute for Mechanical and Automotive Design (iMAD)
Phone: +49 631 205-4012
E-mail: michael.weber[at]mv.uni-kl.de

Melanie Löw | Technische Universität Kaiserslautern
Further information:
http://www.uni-kl.de

More articles from Innovative Products:

nachricht Designing a puncture-free tire
30.01.2020 | University of Illinois College of Engineering

nachricht Stroke patients relearning how to walk with peculiar shoe
18.09.2019 | University of South Florida (USF Innovation)

All articles from Innovative Products >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: The human body as an electrical conductor, a new method of wireless power transfer

Published by Marc Tudela, Laura Becerra-Fajardo, Aracelys García-Moreno, Jesus Minguillon and Antoni Ivorra, in Access, the journal of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers

The project Electronic AXONs: wireless microstimulators based on electronic rectification of epidermically applied currents (eAXON, 2017-2022), funded by a...

Im Focus: Belle II yields the first results: In search of the Z′ boson

The Belle II experiment has been collecting data from physical measurements for about one year. After several years of rebuilding work, both the SuperKEKB electron–positron accelerator and the Belle II detector have been improved compared with their predecessors in order to achieve a 40-fold higher data rate.

Scientists at 12 institutes in Germany are involved in constructing and operating the detector, developing evaluation algorithms, and analyzing the data.

Im Focus: When ions rattle their cage

Electrolytes play a key role in many areas: They are crucial for the storage of energy in our body as well as in batteries. In order to release energy, ions - charged atoms - must move in a liquid such as water. Until now the precise mechanism by which they move through the atoms and molecules of the electrolyte has, however, remained largely unknown. Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research have now shown that the electrical resistance of an electrolyte, which is determined by the motion of ions, can be traced back to microscopic vibrations of these dissolved ions.

In chemistry, common table salt is also known as sodium chloride. If this salt is dissolved in water, sodium and chloride atoms dissolve as positively or...

Im Focus: Harnessing the rain for hydrovoltaics

Drops of water falling on or sliding over surfaces may leave behind traces of electrical charge, causing the drops to charge themselves. Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research (MPI-P) in Mainz have now begun a detailed investigation into this phenomenon that accompanies us in every-day life. They developed a method to quantify the charge generation and additionally created a theoretical model to aid understanding. According to the scientists, the observed effect could be a source of generated power and an important building block for understanding frictional electricity.

Water drops sliding over non-conducting surfaces can be found everywhere in our lives: From the dripping of a coffee machine, to a rinse in the shower, to an...

Im Focus: A sensational discovery: Traces of rainforests in West Antarctica

90 million-year-old forest soil provides unexpected evidence for exceptionally warm climate near the South Pole in the Cretaceous

An international team of researchers led by geoscientists from the Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research (AWI) have now...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Aachen Machine Tool Colloquium AWK'21 will take place on June 10 and 11, 2021

07.04.2020 | Event News

International Coral Reef Symposium in Bremen Postponed by a Year

06.04.2020 | Event News

13th AKL – International Laser Technology Congress: May 4–6, 2022 in Aachen – Laser Technology Live already this year!

02.04.2020 | Event News

 
Latest News

Doubts about basic assumption for the universe

08.04.2020 | Physics and Astronomy

Accelerating AI Together – DFKI Welcomes NVIDIA as Newest Shareholder

08.04.2020 | Information Technology

Ear’s inner secrets revealed with new technology

08.04.2020 | Medical Engineering

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>