Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Engineering Breakthrough Develops Artificial Neuron that ’Learns’

02.07.2004


University of Idaho’s Richard Wells and his microelectronics research team are helping usher in the age of real electronic brains.

UI researchers envision computers one day built from artificial neurons bundled together into networks that can perform tasks onerous to humans, such as dangerous military tactics, automated traffic and emergency dispatching, smart cars that drive themselves and eventually bio-medical applications and prosthetics.

"Our fundamental research on artificial neurons mimics biology and lays the foundation for a complete departure in computing from today’s chip design," says Wells. Information is carried by trains of electrical pulses and codes superior in performance to traditional analog-digital integrated circuitry.



"The low-power technology is miniaturized to a scale approximately the size of a few animal cells per neuron and performs sensing, information processing, routing and actuation, much like the brain or spinal cord." In fact, Wells’ "biomimic artificial neuron" is the basic building block for machines that learn on their own, without the need of programming.

The way this works is through special kinds of interconnections linking groups of biomimic neurons, called “performance feedback signals.” These connections cause other types of connections to become modified in response to these signals. Basically, these signals measure the “goodness” or “badness” of the machine’s output responses to input stimuli. This kind of machine is “trained” instead of programmed.

Wells’ team includes UI engineering faculty members James Frenzel, Terry Soule, James Foster and many of their students. The team has been developing this technology for neuro-fuzzy logic over the past 2 ½ years. This type of “neurocomputer” deals with uncertainty, the missing function of traditional programmed integrated circuitry.

A patent is pending on the biomimic artificial neuron, and the Idaho Research Foundation offers it to interested industry by way of a license agreement. Wells believes it will have special appeal to manufacturing, computing, electronics, space and transportation industries.

"This is a radically different turn in computing hardware technology that will enable companies to design and fabricate their own chip solutions for developing market needs," adds Wells.

Interested industries may contact the IRF, the technology transfer agent of UI. It facilitates commercial and public use of technology developed by UI researchers, patents and licenses UI technologies to private industry in return for royalties, and distributes the royalties to inventors and their colleges. IRF licensees include companies worldwide, and a growing number of ventures in and around the Pacific Northwest.

The Idaho Research Foundation, Inc. is a not-for-profit corporation chartered in Idaho in 1947 to support scientific research and education at the University of Idaho. UI appointed the IRF as its exclusive agent for technical intellectual property and licensing. The IRF fosters and promotes scientific research and inventions and their timely commercial transfer. It also seeks maximum returns to the inventors and the UI, in sound, ethical, legal, and academic fashions.

William Loftus | newswise
Further information:
http://www.uidaho.edu

More articles from Information Technology:

nachricht Quantum bugs, meet your new swatter
20.08.2018 | Rice University

nachricht Metamolds: Molding a mold
20.08.2018 | Institute of Science and Technology Austria

All articles from Information Technology >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: It’s All in the Mix: Jülich Researchers are Developing Fast-Charging Solid-State Batteries

There are currently great hopes for solid-state batteries. They contain no liquid parts that could leak or catch fire. For this reason, they do not require cooling and are considered to be much safer, more reliable, and longer lasting than traditional lithium-ion batteries. Jülich scientists have now introduced a new concept that allows currents up to ten times greater during charging and discharging than previously described in the literature. The improvement was achieved by a “clever” choice of materials with a focus on consistently good compatibility. All components were made from phosphate compounds, which are well matched both chemically and mechanically.

The low current is considered one of the biggest hurdles in the development of solid-state batteries. It is the reason why the batteries take a relatively long...

Im Focus: Color effects from transparent 3D-printed nanostructures

New design tool automatically creates nanostructure 3D-print templates for user-given colors
Scientists present work at prestigious SIGGRAPH conference

Most of the objects we see are colored by pigments, but using pigments has disadvantages: such colors can fade, industrial pigments are often toxic, and...

Im Focus: Unraveling the nature of 'whistlers' from space in the lab

A new study sheds light on how ultralow frequency radio waves and plasmas interact

Scientists at the University of California, Los Angeles present new research on a curious cosmic phenomenon known as "whistlers" -- very low frequency packets...

Im Focus: New interactive machine learning tool makes car designs more aerodynamic

Scientists develop first tool to use machine learning methods to compute flow around interactively designable 3D objects. Tool will be presented at this year’s prestigious SIGGRAPH conference.

When engineers or designers want to test the aerodynamic properties of the newly designed shape of a car, airplane, or other object, they would normally model...

Im Focus: Robots as 'pump attendants': TU Graz develops robot-controlled rapid charging system for e-vehicles

Researchers from TU Graz and their industry partners have unveiled a world first: the prototype of a robot-controlled, high-speed combined charging system (CCS) for electric vehicles that enables series charging of cars in various parking positions.

Global demand for electric vehicles is forecast to rise sharply: by 2025, the number of new vehicle registrations is expected to reach 25 million per year....

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

LaserForum 2018 deals with 3D production of components

17.08.2018 | Event News

Within reach of the Universe

08.08.2018 | Event News

A journey through the history of microscopy – new exhibition opens at the MDC

27.07.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Quantum bugs, meet your new swatter

20.08.2018 | Information Technology

A novel synthetic antibody enables conditional “protein knockdown” in vertebrates

20.08.2018 | Life Sciences

Metamolds: Molding a mold

20.08.2018 | Information Technology

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>