Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

International biomedical engineering experts at BMT 2012 in Jena

18.07.2012
Biosignal processing, patient monitoring and implants – these are the main topics at this year’s Biomedical Engineering Conference (BMT) that will be held from September 16 to September 19 in Jena, Germany.

International experts (e.g. from the USA, Israel, New Zealand, China or Russia) will be presenting recent and future research projects related to all areas of biomedical engineering. The Thuringian Minister of Economic, Work and Technology Affairs, Matthias Machnig, will be speaker of the social event taking place on September 18.

Further keynote speakers will be Prof. Dr. med. Hans-Reiner Figulla, Jena University Hospital, Prof. Dr. Jari Hyttinen, Tampere University of Technology and BioMEdiTech, Finland, Dr. Michael Kempe, Carl Zeiss AG Corporate Research & Technology, Jena, Prof. Dr. Dr. h.c. Roland Sauerbrey , Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), Helmholtz-Gemeinschaft Deutscher Forschungszentren, Prof. Dr. Phyllis K. Stein, Washington University School of Medicine, USA and Prof. Dr. Zang-Hee Cho, Gachon University of Medicine and Science, Republic of Korea.

Organizers of the BMT 2012 are the German Society for Biomedical Engineering within VDE (VDE|DGBMT), Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Ilmenau University of Technology as well as Fachhochschule Jena which are supported by medways – the branch association for medical technology. The conference, which is held in both German and English, aims at physicians, engineers and scientists and is linked to a trade show.

Moreover, interested people may also attend the VDE MedTech Tutorial on September 18, where experts of VDE will provide information about standardization in the area of medical technology, certification services relating to medical-technical appliances and about management systems for medical practices and hospitals. Further events in the course of the conference are the BMBF session “Mensch-Technik-Interaktion in der Gesundheitsversorgung” (human-technology-interaction in health care matters) and the EU session “Horizon 2020” regarding the future promotion of medical technology within the EU. Both sessions are on September 17, 2012.

On September 16, there is the “Young Forum BMT” which addresses students, graduate students and young professionals. Main aspects of this forum are a visit to the Institute of Photonic Technology in Jena, presentations regarding the topic of biomedical engineering as well as a workshop on presentation skills and the design of poster contributions. A panel discussion gives graduates of biomedical engineering sciences the opportunity to report on their respective career entries in industry and science. Furthermore, young scientists will be decorated with the Klee prize, a prize for patient safety and at the student competition.

For participation at the BMT 2012 at a reduced price please apply until July 22. For the current conference program and further information visit www.bmt2012.de.

Press contact: Melanie Mora, Tel. 069 6308461, melanie.mora@vde.com

Melanie Mora | VDE
Further information:
http://www.vde.com

More articles from Event News:

nachricht Leading experts in Diabetes, Metabolism and Biomedical Engineering discuss Precision Medicine
13.07.2018 | Helmholtz Zentrum München - Deutsches Forschungszentrum für Gesundheit und Umwelt

nachricht Conference on Laser Polishing – LaP: Fine Tuning for Surfaces
12.07.2018 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Lasertechnik ILT

All articles from Event News >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: First evidence on the source of extragalactic particles

For the first time ever, scientists have determined the cosmic origin of highest-energy neutrinos. A research group led by IceCube scientist Elisa Resconi, spokesperson of the Collaborative Research Center SFB1258 at the Technical University of Munich (TUM), provides an important piece of evidence that the particles detected by the IceCube neutrino telescope at the South Pole originate from a galaxy four billion light-years away from Earth.

To rule out other origins with certainty, the team led by neutrino physicist Elisa Resconi from the Technical University of Munich and multi-wavelength...

Im Focus: Magnetic vortices: Two independent magnetic skyrmion phases discovered in a single material

For the first time a team of researchers have discovered two different phases of magnetic skyrmions in a single material. Physicists of the Technical Universities of Munich and Dresden and the University of Cologne can now better study and understand the properties of these magnetic structures, which are important for both basic research and applications.

Whirlpools are an everyday experience in a bath tub: When the water is drained a circular vortex is formed. Typically, such whirls are rather stable. Similar...

Im Focus: Breaking the bond: To take part or not?

Physicists working with Roland Wester at the University of Innsbruck have investigated if and how chemical reactions can be influenced by targeted vibrational excitation of the reactants. They were able to demonstrate that excitation with a laser beam does not affect the efficiency of a chemical exchange reaction and that the excited molecular group acts only as a spectator in the reaction.

A frequently used reaction in organic chemistry is nucleophilic substitution. It plays, for example, an important role in in the synthesis of new chemical...

Im Focus: New 2D Spectroscopy Methods

Optical spectroscopy allows investigating the energy structure and dynamic properties of complex quantum systems. Researchers from the University of Würzburg present two new approaches of coherent two-dimensional spectroscopy.

"Put an excitation into the system and observe how it evolves." According to physicist Professor Tobias Brixner, this is the credo of optical spectroscopy....

Im Focus: Chemical reactions in the light of ultrashort X-ray pulses from free-electron lasers

Ultra-short, high-intensity X-ray flashes open the door to the foundations of chemical reactions. Free-electron lasers generate these kinds of pulses, but there is a catch: the pulses vary in duration and energy. An international research team has now presented a solution: Using a ring of 16 detectors and a circularly polarized laser beam, they can determine both factors with attosecond accuracy.

Free-electron lasers (FELs) generate extremely short and intense X-ray flashes. Researchers can use these flashes to resolve structures with diameters on the...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Leading experts in Diabetes, Metabolism and Biomedical Engineering discuss Precision Medicine

13.07.2018 | Event News

Conference on Laser Polishing – LaP: Fine Tuning for Surfaces

12.07.2018 | Event News

11th European Wood-based Panel Symposium 2018: Meeting point for the wood-based materials industry

03.07.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Metal too 'gummy' to cut? Draw on it with a Sharpie or glue stick, science says

19.07.2018 | Materials Sciences

NSF-supported researchers to present new results on hurricanes and other extreme events

19.07.2018 | Earth Sciences

Scientists uncover the role of a protein in production & survival of myelin-forming cells

19.07.2018 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>