Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Large bearing test bench starts continuous operation

28.02.2019

Fraunhofer´s test bench for rotor blade bearings of up to 6.5 meters in diameter has been successfully commissioned at the institute’s Hamburg facility, paving the way for automated continuous operation. Manufacturers and operators stand to benefit, as the accelerated tests – simulating 20 years of service in six months of testing – will enable them to increase the reliability of large rolling bearings and develop new calculation methods and designs. What’s more, a bearing can be validated on the test bench long before it is installed in a wind turbine. The aim is to lower development costs and reduce yield loss in order to make it more economical to operate wind turbines up to 10 MW.

The noise of the seven hydraulic cylinders responsible for dynamic load application gives an impression of the force they transmit to the bearing. In laboratory testing they simulate rotor blade movement and rotor rotation during wind turbine operation, with all the load cycles that represent such an immense load on the rolling bearing.


The highly innovative bearing test rig for offshore wind turbines.

Jan Brandes


In the control room, the load scenarios are monitored for the test.

Jan Brandes

The cycle time of the main controller is one millisecond: the speed at which the human nervous system transmits signals. The commissioning phase was an exciting time for all involved.

“This phase is the manifestation of the past five years of research work and we get to see how well the safety systems and the components interact”, explained Fraunhofer IWES´ Senior Engineer Matthias Stammler.

Failures well before the end of the calculated fatigue life are not unusual for wind turbine rolling bearings. At the moment, certification bodies do not require a service life calculation for such oscillating rolling bearings that connect rotor blade and rotor hub because current methods produce results with limited significance.

Researchers at Fraunhofer IWES want to establish a sound basis: given a better understanding of what is happening early on in the process of damage, designs can be modified, design methods reviewed, and the risk of failure lessened. Comparing simulation data with measurement data makes a detailed fatigue lifetime calculation possible. Not only the bearing as a whole but also individual sections of the raceway are calculated to get more exact figures.

General contractor IDOM joint IWES for the entire construction, commissioning and acceptance. “We worked closely and intensely together with IWES during the last 18 months and we are now very proud to deliver this highly innovative test rig as a landmark for the future testing of the new offshore wind turbine blade bearings -combining very high static and dynamic load capacity, with superb accuracy and finely tuned boundary conditions emulation”, explained Operations Director Dr. Armando Bilbao.

From concept development through to simulation, design, testing, and, finally, diagnosis, the IWES portfolio covers the entire life cycle of a large rolling bearing. In addition to the BEAT 6.1 large bearing test bench, the institute operates other test rigs for rotor blade bearings and main bearings as well as smaller facilities for basic experiments and for testing large quantities.

The first significant test objects weigh around 9,500 kg each and are part of the HAPT (Highly Accelerated Pitch Bearing Test) research project funded by the German Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy (BMWi): eight bearings with a nominal diameter of five meters will undergo tests of function and fatigue between now and the summer 2021.

This project in collaboration with the Institute of Machine Elements, Engineering Design and Tribology (IMKT) of Leibniz University Hannover and the IMO Group aims to develop methods for the accelerated testing of rotor blade bearings.

The Large Bearing Laboratory (LBL) at the institute’s Hamburg facility bundles activities and additionally offers experimental testing facilities for next-generation wind turbine bearings. This test bench expands Fraunhofer IWES’ portfolio of validation services, which, in turn, help turbine and component manufacturers to safeguard further and new developments prior to their market launch.


Technical data:
- Testing of bearings of 3 to 6.5 m in diameter
- Application of static loads of up to 50 MNm
- Dynamic bending moments of +/- 25 MNm at 0.7 Hz
- Highly integrated monitoring and data capturing system with very high processing speeds – self-sufficient operation for months
- Measuring system with 500 high-resolution measurement channels and redundant databases
- Emulation of attachments and their properties

Wissenschaftliche Ansprechpartner:

Matthias Stammler, matthias.stammler@iwes.fraunhofer.de

Christian Broer, christian.broer@iwes.fraunhofer.de

Weitere Informationen:

http://www.iwes.fraunhofer.de
https://www.iwes.fraunhofer.de/content/dam/windenergie/de/video/FH_IDOM%20Messes...

Britta Rollert | Fraunhofer-Institut für Windenergiesysteme IWES

More articles from Machine Engineering:

nachricht One third less consumption: Industry & research work together on fuel-efficient SI engines
04.03.2019 | Forschungsvereinigung Verbrennungskraftmaschinen e.V.

nachricht Directly-cooled electric motor made from polymer materials
01.02.2019 | Fraunhofer Institute for Chemical Technology

All articles from Machine Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Magnetic micro-boats

Nano- and microtechnology are promising candidates not only for medical applications such as drug delivery but also for the creation of little robots or flexible integrated sensors. Scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research (MPI-P) have created magnetic microparticles, with a newly developed method, that could pave the way for building micro-motors or guiding drugs in the human body to a target, like a tumor. The preparation of such structures as well as their remote-control can be regulated using magnetic fields and therefore can find application in an array of domains.

The magnetic properties of a material control how this material responds to the presence of a magnetic field. Iron oxide is the main component of rust but also...

Im Focus: Self-healing coating made of corn starch makes small scratches disappear through heat

Due to the special arrangement of its molecules, a new coating made of corn starch is able to repair small scratches by itself through heat: The cross-linking via ring-shaped molecules makes the material mobile, so that it compensates for the scratches and these disappear again.

Superficial micro-scratches on the car body or on other high-gloss surfaces are harmless, but annoying. Especially in the luxury segment such surfaces are...

Im Focus: Stellar cartography

The Potsdam Echelle Polarimetric and Spectroscopic Instrument (PEPSI) at the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) in Arizona released its first image of the surface magnetic field of another star. In a paper in the European journal Astronomy & Astrophysics, the PEPSI team presents a Zeeman- Doppler-Image of the surface of the magnetically active star II Pegasi.

A special technique allows astronomers to resolve the surfaces of faraway stars. Those are otherwise only seen as point sources, even in the largest telescopes...

Im Focus: Heading towards a tsunami of light

Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology and the University of Gothenburg, Sweden, have proposed a way to create a completely new source of radiation. Ultra-intense light pulses consist of the motion of a single wave and can be described as a tsunami of light. The strong wave can be used to study interactions between matter and light in a unique way. Their research is now published in the scientific journal Physical Review Letters.

"This source of radiation lets us look at reality through a new angle - it is like twisting a mirror and discovering something completely different," says...

Im Focus: Revealing the secret of the vacuum for the first time

New research group at the University of Jena combines theory and experiment to demonstrate for the first time certain physical processes in a quantum vacuum

For most people, a vacuum is an empty space. Quantum physics, on the other hand, assumes that even in this lowest-energy state, particles and antiparticles...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

International Modelica Conference with 330 visitors from 21 countries at OTH Regensburg

11.03.2019 | Event News

Selection Completed: 580 Young Scientists from 88 Countries at the Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting

01.03.2019 | Event News

LightMAT 2019 – 3rd International Conference on Light Materials – Science and Technology

28.02.2019 | Event News

 
Latest News

To proliferate or not to proliferate

21.03.2019 | Life Sciences

Magnetic micro-boats

21.03.2019 | Physics and Astronomy

Motorless pumps and self-regulating valves made from ultrathin film

21.03.2019 | HANNOVER MESSE

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>