Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Major flooding risk could span decades after Chinese earthquake

05.09.2008
Up to 20 million people, thousands of whom are already displaced from their homes following the devastating Chinese earthquake, are at increased risk from flooding and major power shortages in the massive Sichuan Basin over the next few decades and possibly centuries.

Dr Alex Densmore, a geographer from Durham University in the UK, makes the observations on returning from carrying out investigative fieldwork in the China earthquake zone, where nearly 100,000 people were killed in May 2008. He has been studying the active faults in Sichuan for the past eight years.

The biggest risk is posed by the ongoing landslides in Sichuan province, a common occurrence after major earthquakes such as these. Landslides cause rocks and sediment to be dumped in the river valleys, and this material then moves downstream to settle on river beds.

In some areas, river beds are already two to three metres higher due to the increased amounts of sediment after the earthquake. This means that during periods of heavy rains the rivers have greater potential to burst their banks – a risk that will last for decades to centuries.

There is also the potential for build up of sediment in the reservoirs behind the many dams in the area. These reservoirs then become useless for flood control or hydro-electric power generation.

These long term effects of the earthquake should be considered very carefully by the Chinese authorities, says Dr Densmore, who was “astounded and impressed” by the speed and efficiency of response to the earthquake’s short term effects.

Many mountain communities, who took the brunt of the disaster, have been relocated and re-housed into the 500 km-wide Sichuan Basin, which is perceived to be a safer area to live. Up to 20 million people live in the western part of the Basin, where the provincial capital, Chengdu, is also sited.

Dr. Alex Densmore’s research in China is funded by The Natural Environment Research Council (NERC).

Dr Densmore, Director of Hazards Research at Durham University’s Institute of Hazard and Risk Research, said: “We were amazed at how fast the Chinese had responded to this disaster. Many of the people in the mountain areas have been resettled and there are big temporary housing communities with supplies of clean water, power, and access to food and transportation. It is a very impressive response and is a big contrast with how the US responded after Hurricane Katrina.

“However, while the short term response has been excellent, in the longer term they will need to have a well informed discussion about where to permanently move these communities.

“There is a significant risk of a major flooding disaster. At the moment it is very difficult to predict the exact nature of that risk but in ten years or so we may be in a better position. The enhanced risk due to the earthquake will persist for decades, possibly for up to 100 years.

“In the longer term, the authorities will need to look at issues such as moving people out of the flood plains and re-routing transportation links in areas where there are high risks of floods.”

Dr Densmore and his team have been studying the fault lines which caused the earthquake, and found that buildings which were directly on top of the fault line were almost always completely demolished, while others built near the fault were damaged but often remained standing.

He says that when or if it is time to rebuild the devastated towns, planners should consider establishing buffer zones around the fault lines, a practice followed in other places where there is high risk of earthquakes such as North America and Japan. Buildings of flexible materials such as wood and bamboo are preferable to rigid structures of bricks, concrete and mortar.

Claire Whitelaw | alfa
Further information:
http://www.durham.ac.uk/news

Further reports about: Earthquake Sichuan Basin earthquake zone flooding risk river bed river valley

More articles from Earth Sciences:

nachricht Wintertime Arctic sea ice growth slows long-term decline: NASA
07.12.2018 | NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

nachricht Why Tehran Is Sinking Dangerously
06.12.2018 | Helmholtz-Zentrum Potsdam - Deutsches GeoForschungsZentrum GFZ

All articles from Earth Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Topological material switched off and on for the first time

Key advance for future topological transistors

Over the last decade, there has been much excitement about the discovery, recognised by the Nobel Prize in Physics only two years ago, that there are two types...

Im Focus: Researchers develop method to transfer entire 2D circuits to any smooth surface

What if a sensor sensing a thing could be part of the thing itself? Rice University engineers believe they have a two-dimensional solution to do just that.

Rice engineers led by materials scientists Pulickel Ajayan and Jun Lou have developed a method to make atom-flat sensors that seamlessly integrate with devices...

Im Focus: Three components on one chip

Scientists at the University of Stuttgart and the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) succeed in important further development on the way to quantum Computers.

Quantum computers one day should be able to solve certain computing problems much faster than a classical computer. One of the most promising approaches is...

Im Focus: Substitute for rare earth metal oxides

New Project SNAPSTER: Novel luminescent materials by encapsulating phosphorescent metal clusters with organic liquid crystals

Nowadays energy conversion in lighting and optoelectronic devices requires the use of rare earth oxides.

Im Focus: A bit of a stretch... material that thickens as it's pulled

Scientists have discovered the first synthetic material that becomes thicker - at the molecular level - as it is stretched.

Researchers led by Dr Devesh Mistry from the University of Leeds discovered a new non-porous material that has unique and inherent "auxetic" stretching...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

New Plastics Economy Investor Forum - Meeting Point for Innovations

10.12.2018 | Event News

EGU 2019 meeting: Media registration now open

06.12.2018 | Event News

Expert Panel on the Future of HPC in Engineering

03.12.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Electronic evidence of non-Fermi liquid behaviors in an iron-based superconductor

11.12.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

Topological material switched off and on for the first time

11.12.2018 | Materials Sciences

NIST's antenna evaluation method could help boost 5G network capacity and cut costs

11.12.2018 | Information Technology

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>