Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Web-based innovation improves, eases agricultural terrace design

25.09.2009
A new internet-based tool for designing agricultural terraces promises to reduce the considerable labor involved and to optimize design by allowing rapid development of alternative layouts.

Writing in the September 2009 issue of Resource: Engineering & Technology for a Sustainable World, Allen L. Thompson, Associate Professor of Biological and Agricultural Engineering at the University of Missouri, introduces a web-based, computer-assisted tool that may reduce the time currently required for the task by as much as half.

The new tool is intended to facilitate terrace installation on complex fields, to satisfy conservation goals and make better use of federal and state cost-share dollars. Contractors, landowners, and resource conservation personnel will benefit with the ability to select the most efficient and cost-effective terrace layouts.

Current terrace layout methods are time consuming. Rarely is it practical to develop more than one design that can be compared side-by-side for cost, conservation effectiveness, and farmability. Thompson's program will lessen design time by taking information about boundaries, desired row spacing, equipment requirements, water flow and other considerations and quickly producing several layout options.

Because the system is internet-based, it has the advantage of utilizing uploadable topographic data collected with global positioning systems. "It also provides a centralized database that is regularly updated," Thompson writes, "ensuring easy access to the most current data for soils and topography." Ongoing revisions to the program will permit the use of light detection and ranging (LIDAR) data, with the eventual goal to include calculation of cut and fill volumes and predicted soil loss.

Thompson's program builds on other tools developed in recent decades, taking design capabilities to a greater sophistication. Automated terrace layout has been slow in development, he explains, because of the complexity of the calculations required and the lack of high-precision digital elevation data. "However, LIDAR is becoming more readily available, and web resources have greatly improved in the last few years, both of which have helped generate interest and research support in this area."

Beta testing of the program is currently underway, after which the it will be available to the public.

For a copy of the complete Resource article, contact Dolores Landeck, landeck@asabe.org.

The American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers is a scientific and educational organization dedicated to the advancement of engineering applicable to agricultural, food, and biological systems. Members are consultants, managers and others who have the training and experience to understand the interrelationships between technology and living systems. Founded in 1907 and headquartered in St Joseph, Michigan, ASABE comprises 9,000 members from more than 100 countries. For further information, contact ASABE, 2950 Niles Rd, St Joseph, Michigan, 49085; 269-429-0300; hq@asabe.org; www.asabe.org.

Dolores Landeck | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.asabe.org

More articles from Agricultural and Forestry Science:

nachricht New insight into why Pierce's disease is so deadly to grapevines
11.06.2018 | University of California - Davis

nachricht Where are Europe’s last primary forests?
29.05.2018 | Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin

All articles from Agricultural and Forestry Science >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Temperature-controlled fiber-optic light source with liquid core

In a recent publication in the renowned journal Optica, scientists of Leibniz-Institute of Photonic Technology (Leibniz IPHT) in Jena showed that they can accurately control the optical properties of liquid-core fiber lasers and therefore their spectral band width by temperature and pressure tuning.

Already last year, the researchers provided experimental proof of a new dynamic of hybrid solitons– temporally and spectrally stationary light waves resulting...

Im Focus: Overdosing on Calcium

Nano crystals impact stem cell fate during bone formation

Scientists from the University of Freiburg and the University of Basel identified a master regulator for bone regeneration. Prasad Shastri, Professor of...

Im Focus: AchemAsia 2019 will take place in Shanghai

Moving into its fourth decade, AchemAsia is setting out for new horizons: The International Expo and Innovation Forum for Sustainable Chemical Production will take place from 21-23 May 2019 in Shanghai, China. With an updated event profile, the eleventh edition focusses on topics that are especially relevant for the Chinese process industry, putting a strong emphasis on sustainability and innovation.

Founded in 1989 as a spin-off of ACHEMA to cater to the needs of China’s then developing industry, AchemAsia has since grown into a platform where the latest...

Im Focus: First real-time test of Li-Fi utilization for the industrial Internet of Things

The BMBF-funded OWICELLS project was successfully completed with a final presentation at the BMW plant in Munich. The presentation demonstrated a Li-Fi communication with a mobile robot, while the robot carried out usual production processes (welding, moving and testing parts) in a 5x5m² production cell. The robust, optical wireless transmission is based on spatial diversity; in other words, data is sent and received simultaneously by several LEDs and several photodiodes. The system can transmit data at more than 100 Mbit/s and five milliseconds latency.

Modern production technologies in the automobile industry must become more flexible in order to fulfil individual customer requirements.

Im Focus: Sharp images with flexible fibers

An international team of scientists has discovered a new way to transfer image information through multimodal fibers with almost no distortion - even if the fiber is bent. The results of the study, to which scientist from the Leibniz-Institute of Photonic Technology Jena (Leibniz IPHT) contributed, were published on 6thJune in the highly-cited journal Physical Review Letters.

Endoscopes allow doctors to see into a patient’s body like through a keyhole. Typically, the images are transmitted via a bundle of several hundreds of optical...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Munich conference on asteroid detection, tracking and defense

13.06.2018 | Event News

2nd International Baltic Earth Conference in Denmark: “The Baltic Sea region in Transition”

08.06.2018 | Event News

ISEKI_Food 2018: Conference with Holistic View of Food Production

05.06.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Graphene assembled film shows higher thermal conductivity than graphite film

22.06.2018 | Materials Sciences

Fast rising bedrock below West Antarctica reveals an extremely fluid Earth mantle

22.06.2018 | Earth Sciences

Zebrafish's near 360 degree UV-vision knocks stripes off Google Street View

22.06.2018 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>