Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Team of researchers in Vienna has decoded the structure of the ribonucleoprotein (RNP) of rabies virus

29.07.2019

A research team of the Institute of Virology of the University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna has achieved a major breakthrough in exploring the rabies virus: for the first time, researchers were able to exactly depict the structure of the RNP of this virus that is highly dangerous to terrestrial mammals.

The rabies virus (RABV) (genus Lyssavirus, family Rhabdoviridiae, order Mononegavirales) is the primary causative agent of rabies in terrestrial mammals. Human beings are also massively affected by this mortal danger.


3D representation of the RNP complex

© Christiane Riedel/Vetmeduni Vienna

The WHO estimates the annual human death toll to be more than 55,000. The RABV particle consists of a cell derived membrane, in which multiple copies of the surface glycoprotein are anchored, and a helical ribonucleoprotein (RNP), which forms a conical tip at one end.

Although the individual components of the RNP had already been known, the exact structure of an intact RABV-RNP complex had not yet been identified.

Using cryoelectron tomography, an imaging procedure allowing for the three-dimensional representation of the smallest biological structures, and a subsequent computer-assisted analysis by subtomogram averaging, a research team of the University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna around Christiane Riedel, the study’s first author, and Till Rümenapf, the study’s last author, has now succeeded in doing exactly that.

Two viruses as unlike siblings: similar structures, different appearances

The virus structure consists of a right-handed helix, with the 3’-terminal end of the genome located in the RNP cone, as observed in the related Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV). Vesicular stomatitis is a virus disease with a mild course that mainly affects hoofed animals and may cause flu-like symptoms in humans.

“In RABV, interactions between M- and N-proteins are responsible for the connection of neighbouring helical turns, while M-M interactions have been described for VSV. This results in a greater distance between the helix turns compared to VSV and, thus, in a shallower angle between the individual RNP turns and the central virus axis.  This shows a surprising structural variability of the RNP when comparing VSV and RABV, although the crystal structures of the individual components that had already been determined, i.e. the N- and M-proteins, are highly homologous. To put it differently: Although the individual components of RABV and VSV are very similar, there are significant differences in the architectures of the RNPs of the two viruses,” explains Christiane Riedel.

Service:
The article “Cryo EM structure of the rabies virus ribonucleoprotein complex” by Christiane Riedel, Daven Vasishtan, Vojtěch Pražák, Alexander Ghanem, Karl-Klaus Conzelmann and Till Rümenapf was published in Scientific Reports. https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-019-46126-7

Wissenschaftliche Ansprechpartner:

Christiane Riedel
Institute of Virology
University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna (Vetmeduni Vienna)
T +43 1 25077-2705
Christiane.Riedel@vetmeduni.ac.at

Originalpublikation:

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-019-46126-7

Weitere Informationen:

https://www.vetmeduni.ac.at/en/infoservice/press-releases/press-releases-2019/te...

Nina Grötschl | idw - Informationsdienst Wissenschaft

More articles from Agricultural and Forestry Science:

nachricht Giving a chip about masa
18.07.2019 | American Society of Agronomy

nachricht Global farming trends threaten food security
11.07.2019 | Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg

All articles from Agricultural and Forestry Science >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: A miniature stretchable pump for the next generation of soft robots

Soft robots have a distinct advantage over their rigid forebears: they can adapt to complex environments, handle fragile objects and interact safely with humans. Made from silicone, rubber or other stretchable polymers, they are ideal for use in rehabilitation exoskeletons and robotic clothing. Soft bio-inspired robots could one day be deployed to explore remote or dangerous environments.

Most soft robots are actuated by rigid, noisy pumps that push fluids into the machines' moving parts. Because they are connected to these bulky pumps by tubes,...

Im Focus: Vehicle Emissions: New sensor technology to improve air quality in cities

Researchers at TU Graz are working together with European partners on new possibilities of measuring vehicle emissions.

Today, air pollution is one of the biggest challenges facing European cities. As part of the Horizon 2020 research project CARES (City Air Remote Emission...

Im Focus: Self healing robots that "feel pain"

Over the next three years, researchers from the Vrije Universiteit Brussel, University of Cambridge, École Supérieure de Physique et de Chimie Industrielles de la ville de Paris (ESPCI-Paris) and Empa will be working together with the Dutch Polymer manufacturer SupraPolix on the next generation of robots: (soft) robots that ‘feel pain’ and heal themselves. The partners can count on 3 million Euro in support from the European Commission.

Soon robots will not only be found in factories and laboratories, but will be assisting us in our immediate environment. They will help us in the household, to...

Im Focus: Scientists create the world's thinnest gold

Scientists at the University of Leeds have created a new form of gold which is just two atoms thick - the thinnest unsupported gold ever created.

The researchers measured the thickness of the gold to be 0.47 nanometres - that is one million times thinner than a human finger nail. The material is regarded...

Im Focus: Study on attosecond timescale casts new light on electron dynamics in transition metals

An international team of scientists involving the Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter (MPSD) in Hamburg has unraveled the light-induced electron-localization dynamics in transition metals at the attosecond timescale. The team investigated for the first time the many-body electron dynamics in transition metals before thermalization sets in. Their work has now appeared in Nature Physics.

The researchers from ETH Zurich (Switzerland), the MPSD (Germany), the Center for Computational Sciences of University of Tsukuba (Japan) and the Center for...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

The power of thought – the key to success: CYBATHLON BCI Series 2019

16.08.2019 | Event News

4th Hybrid Materials and Structures 2020 28 - 29 April 2020, Karlsruhe, Germany

14.08.2019 | Event News

What will the digital city of the future look like? City Science Summit on 1st and 2nd October 2019 in Hamburg

12.08.2019 | Event News

 
Latest News

Working out why plants get sick

16.08.2019 | Life Sciences

Newfound superconductor material could be the 'silicon of quantum computers'

16.08.2019 | Physics and Astronomy

Stanford develops wireless sensors that stick to the skin to track our health

16.08.2019 | Medical Engineering

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>