Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

For some, aspirin doesn’t increase risk of recurring hemorrhagic stroke

24.01.2006


Aspirin is typically prescribed for people at risk of having an ischemic stroke to prevent blood clots. Because aspirin may cause bleeding, it is typically avoided in people who have had a hemorrhagic stroke, also called intracerebral hemorrhage. A new study, however, finds that aspirin may not increase the risk of recurrent intracerebral hemorrhage. The study is published in the January 24, 2006 issue of Neurology, the scientific journal of the American Academy of Neurology (AAN).



Researchers followed 207 survivors of intracerebral hemorrhage at regular intervals to check whether they took an antiplatelet drug such as aspirin and if it increased their risk of another hemorrhage. In an intracerebral hemorrhage, a blood vessel bursts within the brain resulting in a pressure buildup that can lead to unconsciousness or death.

Out of 46 people who had aspirin treatment at some point during follow-up, seven had a recurrent intracerebral hemorrhage. Aspirin was prescribed to prevent ischemic heart disease in half of the group. No cases were reported where nonprescription aspirin was taken without a doctor’s recommendations. There were 32 others who also had a recurrent intracerebral hemorrhage but didn’t take any aspirin.


"We observed no association between aspirin use and an increased risk of recurrent intracerebral hemorrhage," said lead author Anand Viswanathan, MD, PhD, a neurologist at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston and a member of the AAN. "Aspirin could be a potentially useful strategy for improving the quality of life in certain intracerebral hemorrhage survivors who are at risk for ischemic stroke, but this should be confirmed in a randomized clinical trial."

Recurrent intracerebral hemorrhage is more common in survivors of a hemorrhage in the lobar region (cerebral cortex) than in deep brain structures (brainstem, thalamus, and striatum). Thirty-five out of 127 survivors of lobar hemorrhage had a recurrent hemorrhage, compared to four out of 80 survivors of deep hemorrhage. Yet aspirin use had no significant effect on the rate of recurrence after a hemorrhage in either location, according to the study.

In a related editorial, Larry B. Goldstein, MD, a neurologist at Duke University and the Duke Center for Cerebrovascular Disease and also a fellow of the AAN, wrote, "Despite the lack of demonstrable increased risk of recurrent intracranial bleeding in patients treated with platelet antiaggregants in this cohort, it is also uncertain whether the patients benefited from these drugs. Until additional data become available, the use of antiplatelet drugs in this setting should be restricted to highly selected patients with a compelling indication and a relatively low risk of recurrent hemorrhage."

Marilee Tuite | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.aan.com

More articles from Materials Sciences:

nachricht New materials: Growing polymer pelts
19.11.2018 | Karlsruher Institut für Technologie (KIT)

nachricht Why geckos can stick to walls
19.11.2018 | Jacobs University Bremen gGmbH

All articles from Materials Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: UNH scientists help provide first-ever views of elusive energy explosion

Researchers at the University of New Hampshire have captured a difficult-to-view singular event involving "magnetic reconnection"--the process by which sparse particles and energy around Earth collide producing a quick but mighty explosion--in the Earth's magnetotail, the magnetic environment that trails behind the planet.

Magnetic reconnection has remained a bit of a mystery to scientists. They know it exists and have documented the effects that the energy explosions can...

Im Focus: A Chip with Blood Vessels

Biochips have been developed at TU Wien (Vienna), on which tissue can be produced and examined. This allows supplying the tissue with different substances in a very controlled way.

Cultivating human cells in the Petri dish is not a big challenge today. Producing artificial tissue, however, permeated by fine blood vessels, is a much more...

Im Focus: A Leap Into Quantum Technology

Faster and secure data communication: This is the goal of a new joint project involving physicists from the University of Würzburg. The German Federal Ministry of Education and Research funds the project with 14.8 million euro.

In our digital world data security and secure communication are becoming more and more important. Quantum communication is a promising approach to achieve...

Im Focus: Research icebreaker Polarstern begins the Antarctic season

What does it look like below the ice shelf of the calved massive iceberg A68?

On Saturday, 10 November 2018, the research icebreaker Polarstern will leave its homeport of Bremerhaven, bound for Cape Town, South Africa.

Im Focus: Penn engineers develop ultrathin, ultralight 'nanocardboard'

When choosing materials to make something, trade-offs need to be made between a host of properties, such as thickness, stiffness and weight. Depending on the application in question, finding just the right balance is the difference between success and failure

Now, a team of Penn Engineers has demonstrated a new material they call "nanocardboard," an ultrathin equivalent of corrugated paper cardboard. A square...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Optical Coherence Tomography: German-Japanese Research Alliance hosted Medical Imaging Conference

19.11.2018 | Event News

“3rd Conference on Laser Polishing – LaP 2018” Attracts International Experts and Users

09.11.2018 | Event News

On the brain’s ability to find the right direction

06.11.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Mutation that causes autism and intellectual disability makes brain less flexible

20.11.2018 | Life Sciences

The sweet side of reproductive biology

20.11.2018 | Life Sciences

Fading stripes in Southeast Asia: First insight into the ecology of an elusive and threatened rabbit

20.11.2018 | Ecology, The Environment and Conservation

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>