Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Mesoporous Particles for the Development of Drug Delivery System Safe to Human Bodies

22.05.2015

A research group at Materials Nanoarchitectonics (MANA), National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), succeeded in developing porous particles (mesoporous particles) consisting solely of phospholipids, a biological component, that are suitable for use as a drug delivery system.

A research group led by MANA Scientist Kohsaku Kawakami, postdoctoral researcher Shaoling Zhang and MANA Principal Investigator Katsuhiko Ariga, at the International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics (MANA), NIMS (Sukekatsu Ushioda, President), succeeded in developing porous particles (mesoporous particles) consisting solely of phospholipids, a biological component, that are suitable for use as a drug delivery system.


Figure 1. External views of porous phospholipid particles (electron micrographs) (a, b) Particles created in organic (non-aqueous) solvent, (c, d) particles created in organic solvent in the presence of small amount of water. Only hydrogenated soybean lecithin was used to create them. The shape of the particles varies greatly depending on the presence/absence of water in the solvent.

Copyright : MANA, NIMS

This study had been published in the Journal of Physical Chemistry C on 16 March, 2015. (Shaoling Zhang, Kohsaku Kawakami, Lok Kumar Shrestha, Gladstone Christopher Jayakumar, Jonathan P. Hill, and Katsuhiko Ariga, article title: Totally phospholipidic mesoporous particles) J. Phys. Chem. C, 2015, 119 (13), pp 7255–7263, DOI: 10.1021/acs.jpcc.5b00159.

Mesoporous materials are a type of material capable of serving as a drug delivery system. In conventional studies, hard materials such as silica and carbon materials have been used for such purposes, posing safety concerns to patients. The mesoporous material developed in this study consists exclusively of biologically-derived materials and is therefore expected to be very safe for humans.

Acquisition of official approval is one of the hurdles in the development of materials for use as a drug delivery system. To develop a certified pharmaceutical product, it is necessary to demonstrate the safety of the additive to be used before investigating the safety of the product itself.

For this reason, pharmaceutical companies tend to avoid using new additives, which had been slowing the development of new drug carriers. However, the phospholipids examined in this study have already been used as emulsions and liposomes, and thus are not regarded as new additives. This fact is a great advantage of this material in view of commercialization.

This material comprises highly uniform mesoporous particles with diameters ranging between 5 and 20 μm, depending on their composition. It is a very lightweight material with a bulk density of about 0.02 g/cm3, from which an aerodynamic diameter of 1 to 3 μm is calculated. These are ideal features for this material to be used as a powder inhalation carrier.

Since this material consists of lipid bilayer membranes that are similar to biological membranes, it possesses the characteristics of both mesoporous particles and liposomes. For example, it can be used with both hydrophobic and hydrophilic drugs. Hydrophobic drugs can be embedded in a lipid bilayer membrane, and hydrophilic drugs can be inserted into hydrophilic regions between lipid bilayer membranes.

Furthermore, as it is also feasible for the material to hold drugs in its mesopores, the material is capable of carrying drugs with various physical properties. Since phospholipids can be easily modified, it is conceivable that various kinds of surface modifications can be applied to the material.

This material is suited for industrial production as it can be easily prepared through freeze-drying. And it is expected to be useful as a drug carrier assuming any administration route and as a cosmetic ingredient. The unique shape of the particles also may add value to the commercial product.

This study had been published in the Journal of Physical Chemistry C issued by the American Chemical Society. It was also presented at the MANA Symposium at the Tsukuba International Congress Center (presentation: 3:20 p.m. on March 12, titled “Bio-inspired nanoarchitectonics for early and patient-oriented medical treatment” by K. Kawakami).


Associated links
NIMS article

Mikiko Tanifuji | ResearchSEA

More articles from Materials Sciences:

nachricht New 3D interconnection technology for future wearable bioelectronics
15.08.2019 | Institute for Basic Science

nachricht Rewriting the periodic table at high pressure
15.08.2019 | Chalmers University of Technology

All articles from Materials Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Towards an 'orrery' for quantum gauge theory

Experimental progress towards engineering quantized gauge fields coupled to ultracold matter promises a versatile platform to tackle problems ranging from condensed-matter to high-energy physics

The interaction between fields and matter is a recurring theme throughout physics. Classical cases such as the trajectories of one celestial body moving in the...

Im Focus: A miniature stretchable pump for the next generation of soft robots

Soft robots have a distinct advantage over their rigid forebears: they can adapt to complex environments, handle fragile objects and interact safely with humans. Made from silicone, rubber or other stretchable polymers, they are ideal for use in rehabilitation exoskeletons and robotic clothing. Soft bio-inspired robots could one day be deployed to explore remote or dangerous environments.

Most soft robots are actuated by rigid, noisy pumps that push fluids into the machines' moving parts. Because they are connected to these bulky pumps by tubes,...

Im Focus: Vehicle Emissions: New sensor technology to improve air quality in cities

Researchers at TU Graz are working together with European partners on new possibilities of measuring vehicle emissions.

Today, air pollution is one of the biggest challenges facing European cities. As part of the Horizon 2020 research project CARES (City Air Remote Emission...

Im Focus: Self healing robots that "feel pain"

Over the next three years, researchers from the Vrije Universiteit Brussel, University of Cambridge, École Supérieure de Physique et de Chimie Industrielles de la ville de Paris (ESPCI-Paris) and Empa will be working together with the Dutch Polymer manufacturer SupraPolix on the next generation of robots: (soft) robots that ‘feel pain’ and heal themselves. The partners can count on 3 million Euro in support from the European Commission.

Soon robots will not only be found in factories and laboratories, but will be assisting us in our immediate environment. They will help us in the household, to...

Im Focus: Scientists create the world's thinnest gold

Scientists at the University of Leeds have created a new form of gold which is just two atoms thick - the thinnest unsupported gold ever created.

The researchers measured the thickness of the gold to be 0.47 nanometres - that is one million times thinner than a human finger nail. The material is regarded...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

The power of thought – the key to success: CYBATHLON BCI Series 2019

16.08.2019 | Event News

4th Hybrid Materials and Structures 2020 28 - 29 April 2020, Karlsruhe, Germany

14.08.2019 | Event News

What will the digital city of the future look like? City Science Summit on 1st and 2nd October 2019 in Hamburg

12.08.2019 | Event News

 
Latest News

All-in-one: New microbe degrades oil to gas

20.08.2019 | Life Sciences

Spinning lightwaves on a one-way street

20.08.2019 | Physics and Astronomy

Materials that can revolutionize how light is harnessed for solar energy

20.08.2019 | Power and Electrical Engineering

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>