Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Anti-social behaviour stopped with the right support

19.01.2006


Anti-social behaviour (ASB) can be prevented by addressing the myriad of social and health care needs of the perpetrators and their families, according to an independent report published today.



The report studied ASB rehabilitation projects, which offer multi-disciplinary support to stop anti-social behaviour by resolving its underlying causes. This can either be by offering support to families in their own homes or by moving families to managed accommodation.

The study, conducted by experts at Sheffield Hallam University, and published by the Office of the Deputy Prime Minister (ODPM), found that families referred to the projects have a range of health, social and education needs which are often unaddressed.


The study’s interim research findings show that families referred to the projects tended to be large, and were usually headed by a lone female parent (80 per cent). A quarter of the families had at least one child with special educational needs, 39 per cent had at least one member with mental health problems and 27 per cent had members with drug and alcohol problems. 28 per cent of the families also reported some sort of family violence, which in a number of cases was committed by teenage children.

Families are usually referred to the ASB rehabilitation service when they have been the subject of complaints for a considerable period of time. The majority of the families have received eviction warnings with regard to the anti-social behaviour before they are referred.

Judy Nixon, senior lecturer at the Centre for Social Inclusion at Sheffield Hallam University and leader of the study explains, “The ASB rehabilitation projects typically offer a broad range of support, from practical day to day to help to more complex help that addresses the root causes of the problem behaviour.”

“We found that around 60 per cent of the families who were referred to the project fully participated and agencies who referred families to the project had very positive views about its impact, for example in reducing complaints about anti-social behaviour, improving the welfare of any children and in preventing the need for families to be evicted.

“Whilst these are only interim findings from a small sample of families they do demonstrate that effective, intensive intervention can help families to overcome or manage the underlying issues that can cause anti-social behaviour.”

Lorna Branton | alfa
Further information:
http://www.shu.ac.uk

More articles from Social Sciences:

nachricht Amazingly flexible: Learning to read in your thirties profoundly transforms the brain
26.05.2017 | Max-Planck-Institut für Kognitions- und Neurowissenschaften

nachricht Fixating on faces
26.01.2017 | California Institute of Technology

All articles from Social Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Neutron star merger directly observed for the first time

University of Maryland researchers contribute to historic detection of gravitational waves and light created by event

On August 17, 2017, at 12:41:04 UTC, scientists made the first direct observation of a merger between two neutron stars--the dense, collapsed cores that remain...

Im Focus: Breaking: the first light from two neutron stars merging

Seven new papers describe the first-ever detection of light from a gravitational wave source. The event, caused by two neutron stars colliding and merging together, was dubbed GW170817 because it sent ripples through space-time that reached Earth on 2017 August 17. Around the world, hundreds of excited astronomers mobilized quickly and were able to observe the event using numerous telescopes, providing a wealth of new data.

Previous detections of gravitational waves have all involved the merger of two black holes, a feat that won the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physics earlier this month....

Im Focus: Smart sensors for efficient processes

Material defects in end products can quickly result in failures in many areas of industry, and have a massive impact on the safe use of their products. This is why, in the field of quality assurance, intelligent, nondestructive sensor systems play a key role. They allow testing components and parts in a rapid and cost-efficient manner without destroying the actual product or changing its surface. Experts from the Fraunhofer IZFP in Saarbrücken will be presenting two exhibits at the Blechexpo in Stuttgart from 7–10 November 2017 that allow fast, reliable, and automated characterization of materials and detection of defects (Hall 5, Booth 5306).

When quality testing uses time-consuming destructive test methods, it can result in enormous costs due to damaging or destroying the products. And given that...

Im Focus: Cold molecules on collision course

Using a new cooling technique MPQ scientists succeed at observing collisions in a dense beam of cold and slow dipolar molecules.

How do chemical reactions proceed at extremely low temperatures? The answer requires the investigation of molecular samples that are cold, dense, and slow at...

Im Focus: Shrinking the proton again!

Scientists from the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics, using high precision laser spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen, confirm the surprisingly small value of the proton radius determined from muonic hydrogen.

It was one of the breakthroughs of the year 2010: Laser spectroscopy of muonic hydrogen resulted in a value for the proton charge radius that was significantly...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

ASEAN Member States discuss the future role of renewable energy

17.10.2017 | Event News

World Health Summit 2017: International experts set the course for the future of Global Health

10.10.2017 | Event News

Climate Engineering Conference 2017 Opens in Berlin

10.10.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Ocean atmosphere rife with microbes

17.10.2017 | Life Sciences

Neutrons observe vitamin B6-dependent enzyme activity useful for drug development

17.10.2017 | Life Sciences

NASA finds newly formed tropical storm lan over open waters

17.10.2017 | Earth Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>