Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Building bridges: local responses to the resettlement of asylum seekers

08.12.2004


New research reveals the positive role of local people and groups in promoting the integration of asylum seekers in Glasgow. As birth rates decline and the population ages in Scotland, refugees could bring significant benefits to Scottish society in the future. To promote their future participation in Scottish society, it is vital that appropriate support services are in place.



Around 10,000 asylum seekers of more than 70 different nationalities have been resettled in Glasgow since a national dispersal policy was implemented in April 2000. “In the early days, the media tended to focus on the problems associated with dispersal. This report tells another story”, explains Dr Karen Wren, from the University of Glasgow. “It shows that despite the racism experienced by some asylum seekers in Glasgow, there is another face to Scottish society which has sought to embrace values of social justice which extend beyond the limits of local communities in the city, and beyond the borders of the UK.”

The research has been carried out by Dr Karen Wren at the Scottish Centre for Research on Social Justice (SCRSJ) led by the Department of Urban Studies at the University of Glasgow in partnership with the Arkleton Centre for Rural Development Research at the University of Aberdeen.


The report examines the work of the ten asylum seeker resettlement and integration networks in Glasgow. It documents the dedication and hard work of professionals and local volunteers in supporting asylum seekers dispersed to Glasgow. The networks are area-based multi-agency partnerships set up to facilitate the role of the voluntary sector in supporting asylum seekers in localities where they have been dispersed. The networks have promoted dialogue between the agencies providing support services for asylum seekers and have also assisted the involvement of local communities in activities designed to promote social interaction and integration.

Dr Karen Wren explains: “The networks have had to respond very rapidly to changing local needs associated with the arrival of several thousand asylum seekers in Glasgow, in a context where communities had not been prepared for their arrival. This preliminary research outlines the work of the networks, their future support needs and concerns in relation to their work with asylum seekers. It effectively constitutes a ‘snapshot in time’ on rapidly changing territory. It also emphasises that the sustainability of the networks as a viable form of local support for asylum seekers will depend on continuing support and funding.”

The work of the networks was found to be highly responsive to the needs of asylum seekers, and the local church drop-ins in particular have played a key role in providing a very personalised and humane quality of service.

UK immigration and asylum policy was experienced by service providers as disjointed and lacking in coherence. Service providers felt that their work was hampered by a punitive Westminster policy framework, while the Scottish Executive was perceived to be promoting integration work in a more positive way. Key issues of concern raised by the participants in this respect were the removal of the right to work for asylum seekers in 2002 and the detention of asylum seekers at Dungavel. Many participants expressed a need for more devolution of some aspects of immigration and asylum policy.

Jenny Murray | alfa
Further information:
http://www.gla.ac.uk:443/newsdesk/stories2.cfm?PRID=2985

More articles from Social Sciences:

nachricht Illinois researchers researchers find tweeting in cities lower than expected
21.02.2018 | University of Illinois College of Engineering

nachricht Polluted air may pollute our morality
08.02.2018 | Association for Psychological Science

All articles from Social Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: LZH showcases laser material processing of tomorrow at the LASYS 2018

At the LASYS 2018, from June 5th to 7th, the Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V. (LZH) will be showcasing processes for the laser material processing of tomorrow in hall 4 at stand 4E75. With blown bomb shells the LZH will present first results of a research project on civil security.

At this year's LASYS, the LZH will exhibit light-based processes such as cutting, welding, ablation and structuring as well as additive manufacturing for...

Im Focus: Self-illuminating pixels for a new display generation

There are videos on the internet that can make one marvel at technology. For example, a smartphone is casually bent around the arm or a thin-film display is rolled in all directions and with almost every diameter. From the user's point of view, this looks fantastic. From a professional point of view, however, the question arises: Is that already possible?

At Display Week 2018, scientists from the Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Polymer Research IAP will be demonstrating today’s technological possibilities and...

Im Focus: Explanation for puzzling quantum oscillations has been found

So-called quantum many-body scars allow quantum systems to stay out of equilibrium much longer, explaining experiment | Study published in Nature Physics

Recently, researchers from Harvard and MIT succeeded in trapping a record 53 atoms and individually controlling their quantum state, realizing what is called a...

Im Focus: Dozens of binaries from Milky Way's globular clusters could be detectable by LISA

Next-generation gravitational wave detector in space will complement LIGO on Earth

The historic first detection of gravitational waves from colliding black holes far outside our galaxy opened a new window to understanding the universe. A...

Im Focus: Entangled atoms shine in unison

A team led by Austrian experimental physicist Rainer Blatt has succeeded in characterizing the quantum entanglement of two spatially separated atoms by observing their light emission. This fundamental demonstration could lead to the development of highly sensitive optical gradiometers for the precise measurement of the gravitational field or the earth's magnetic field.

The age of quantum technology has long been heralded. Decades of research into the quantum world have led to the development of methods that make it possible...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Save the date: Forum European Neuroscience – 07-11 July 2018 in Berlin, Germany

02.05.2018 | Event News

Invitation to the upcoming "Current Topics in Bioinformatics: Big Data in Genomics and Medicine"

13.04.2018 | Event News

Unique scope of UV LED technologies and applications presented in Berlin: ICULTA-2018

12.04.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Spinning rugby balls: The rotation of the most massive galaxies

23.05.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

Raiding the rape field

23.05.2018 | Agricultural and Forestry Science

Turning entanglement upside down

23.05.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>