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Sulfur High Up in Down Under

18.10.2010
8th International Workshop on Sulfur Metabolism in Higher Plants at The University of Melbourne - Creswick Campus - November 22nd - 27th, 2010

The 8th International Workshop on "Sulfur Metabolism in Plants: Mechanisms and Application to Food Security and Responses to Climate Change" will be held at The University of Melbourne - Creswick Campus (Water Street, Creswick, Victoria 3363, Australia) starting November 22nd - 27th, 2010.

The aim of the Plant Sulfur Workshop series is to broaden, to integrate and to further strengthening research on "Managing Sulfur Metabolism in Plants", "Sustainable Development, Global Change and Ecosystems" and "Food Quality and Safety".

This is implemented by regular scientific meetings covering the actual relevant topics of plant sulfur research including workshops focused on
- post genomic technologies and plant sulfur nutrition,
- engineering quality,
- cross-talk of metabolic pathways interacting with sulfur,
- managing sulfur nutrition,
- diagnosing sulfur deficiency,
- sulfur in plants and stress responses,
- push-pull regulation of sulfur assimilation pathways,
- (global) regulators of sulfur metabolism,
- interaction between sulfur and nitrogen metabolism.
The proceedings have been published in a series and that of the 8th International Workshop will be published by Springer in 2011.

The Institute for Crop and Soil Science of the Julius Kühn-Institute in Braunschweig is specialized on research in the field of sulfur fertilization and yield, quality and health of agricultural crops and medicinal plants. In Creswick, up-to-date research in the field of sulfur and biotic interactions with special view to Sulfur-Induce Resistance (SIR) will be presented for different host/pathogen systems and strategies provided for applied S fertilization practices in different crop systems, which live up to all agronomic aspects.

The workshop is jointly organized by

- Julius Kühn-Institute, Braunschweig, Germany;
- University of Melbourne, Australia,
- University of Groningen, The Netherlands,
- Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand,
- International Plant Nutrition Institute, Horsham, Australia,
- CSIRO Plant Industry, Canberra, Australia,
- Rothamsted Research, Harpenden U.K.,
- Max Planck Institute of Molecular Plant Physiology, Golm, Germany,
- University of Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany,
- RIKEN Plant Science Center, Yokohama, Japan.
Previous Plant Sulfur Workshops in this series were held in Haren, the Netherlands, 1989; Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany, 1992; Newcastle upon Tyne, U.K., 1996; Wengen, Switzerland, 1999; Montpellier, France, 2002; Kisarazu, Chiba, Japan, 2005; Warsaw, Poland, 2008.
Contacts:
Prof. Dr. Michael Tausz
Department of Forest and Ecosystem Science
University of Melbourne
Water Street, Creswick, Victoria 3363
Australia
E-mail : michael.tausz(at)unimelb.edu.au
Prof. Dr. Luit J. De Kok
Laboratory of Plant Physiology, University of Groningen
Kerklaan 30
9751 NN Haren
The Netherlands
E-mail :l.j.de.kok(at)rug.nl
Prof. Dr. Dr. habil. Dr. h.c. Ewald Schnug
Institute of Crop and Soil Science (JKI)
Bundesallee 50
D-38116 Braunschweig, Germany
E-mail: pb(at)jki.bund.de

Stefanie Hahn | idw
Further information:
http://www.plantsulfur.org
http://www.sulphyton.org/

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