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Mantle Cell Lymphoma Consortium Scientific Workshop

Report from sixth annual meeting now available

Almost 60 mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) specialists from around the world gathered in Atlanta, GA for the Lymphoma Research Foundation's (LRF) Sixth Annual Mantle Cell Lymphoma Consortium (MCLC) Scientific Workshop. Attendees heard presentations addressing several key issues including the biology of MCL, prognostic indicators, new molecular targets, chemoimmunotherapy, transplantation and novel therapeutic approaches.

The MCLC was established by the Lymphoma Research Foundation (LRF) in 2005 to accelerate the pace of mantle cell lymphoma research. Attendees to this year's workshop included: LRF MCLC members, including LRF MCL grant recipients as well as other scientific investigators conducting cutting-edge research.

As in the past, this year's meeting provided a unique opportunity for experts to report on their research findings and exchange ideas on how to best improve treatment options for individuals living with MCL. Those in attendance heard 17 oral presentations, viewed 9 poster presentations and participated in 6 roundtable discussions covering areas such as: Clinical Trails for Younger Patients, Epigenetic Studies in MCL and Cell Cycle Targets for MCL.

A Research Report detailing each oral and poster presentation as well as the roundtable discussions is available. To request a copy, please email

About Mantle Cell Lymphoma

Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is a B-cell lymphoma that gets its name because mantle cell tumors are composed of cells that come from the "mantle" zone of the lymph node. Frequently, MCL is diagnosed as a stage 4 disease, often present in lymphnodes above and below the diaphragm and in most cases involves the gastrointestinal tract and bone marrow. MCL is a relatively rare disease, constituting only about 6 percent of all NHL cases in the United States (i.e., only about 3,000 cases per year in the U.S.). This lymphoma usually affects men over the age of 60.

About Mantle Cell Lymphoma Consortium

Established by LRF in January 2005, the MCLC is comprised of more than 100 laboratory and clinical scientists from North America and Europe who focus their research on MCL. The MCLC is designed to accelerate the understanding and treatment of MCL by bringing together these lead investigators, funding innovative studies and creating important resources such as the MCL website and cell bank.

About the Lymphoma Research Foundation

The Lymphoma Research Foundation (LRF) is the nation's largest voluntary health organization devoted exclusively to funding lymphoma research and providing patients and healthcare professionals with critical information on the disease. LRF's mission is to eradicate lymphoma and serve those touched by this disease.

As of June 30, 2008, LRF has funded over $37 million in lymphoma-specific research. The Foundation is the world's largest private funder of mantle cell lymphoma research. LRF also provides a comprehensive series of programs and services for patients, survivors and loved ones affected by lymphoma, including our toll-free Lymphoma Helpline and Clinical Trials Information Service, in-person patient education programs, webcasts/teleconferences and support services.

Marion F. Swan | EurekAlert!
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