Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Comet ISON Observer's Workshop Set for Aug. 1-2 at Johns Hopkins APL

16.07.2013
A workshop will be held at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) in Laurel, Md. on Aug. 1-2, 2013 to maximize the scientific opportunities and data gathered during the upcoming visit to our solar system by Comet ISON.

This rare type of comet, discovered in late 2012, is about to swoop into the inner solar system. In late November, it will pass within 684,000 miles of the sun, categorizing it as a sungrazer comet.

“This is an extraordinary event,” says APL’s Carey Lisse, head of NASA’s Comet ISON Observation Campaign (CIOC), and organizer of the workshop. “Comet ISON will help show us what the recipe for building the solar system was. Comets like ISON are the dinosaur bones of solar system formation.”

Comet ISON is believed to come from the distant Oort Cloud, a roughly spherical collection of comets and comet-like structures about one light-year away from the sun. ISON may contain the same fundamental building blocks that led to the formation of life on Earth some 3.5 billion years ago, so scientists are keen to study it using modern instruments and observatories located around Earth and the solar system. NASA is leading an effort to observe and study this comet, providing the use of its available resources including currently operating spacecraft, ground-based telescopes and the Balloon Rapid Response for ISON (BRRISON) project, launching this fall.

This is likely ISON’s first visit to our solar system, which makes predictions of its travels somewhat uncertain. “It remains difficult to predict exactly how bright the comet will become in November,” says Lisse. “However, the potential exists for this to be one of the brightest comets of the past century. We encourage observers from around the world to study this fascinating comet.”

Confirmed workshop speakers include Kelly Fast, Lindley Johnson, Mike Mumma and Diane Wooden from NASA; Mike A'Hearn, Tony Farnham and Lori Feaga from the University of Maryland; Andy Cheng from APL; Jian-Yang Li from the Planetary Science Institute; Karel Schrijver from the Lockheed-Martin Solar and Astrophysics Lab; and the CIOC team.

Pre-registration is required for attendance; members of the working press and media should also register to attend. The workshop will be streamed live and archived for later viewing. Details are available at https://dnnpro.outer.jhuapl.edu/isonworkshop/Home.aspx.

Learn more about NASA’s Comet ISON Observing Campaign at: http://www.isoncampaign.org

NASA’s Comet ISON Toolkit is at: http://solarsystem.nasa.gov/planets/profile.cfm?Object=Comets&Display=Events.

The Applied Physics Laboratory, a not-for-profit division of The Johns Hopkins University, meets critical national challenges through the innovative application of science and technology. For more information, visit www.jhuapl.edu.

Geoffrey Brown | Newswise
Further information:
http://www.jhuapl.edu

More articles from Seminars Workshops:

nachricht Virtual Worlds: Research Trends in Mobile 3D Data Collection
30.11.2016 | Fraunhofer IPM

nachricht 4th UKP-Workshop 2017 – Save the Date!
15.09.2016 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Lasertechnik ILT

All articles from Seminars Workshops >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Giant Magnetic Fields in the Universe

Astronomers from Bonn and Tautenburg in Thuringia (Germany) used the 100-m radio telescope at Effelsberg to observe several galaxy clusters. At the edges of these large accumulations of dark matter, stellar systems (galaxies), hot gas, and charged particles, they found magnetic fields that are exceptionally ordered over distances of many million light years. This makes them the most extended magnetic fields in the universe known so far.

The results will be published on March 22 in the journal „Astronomy & Astrophysics“.

Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound structures in the universe. With a typical extent of about 10 million light years, i.e. 100 times the...

Im Focus: Tracing down linear ubiquitination

Researchers at the Goethe University Frankfurt, together with partners from the University of Tübingen in Germany and Queen Mary University as well as Francis Crick Institute from London (UK) have developed a novel technology to decipher the secret ubiquitin code.

Ubiquitin is a small protein that can be linked to other cellular proteins, thereby controlling and modulating their functions. The attachment occurs in many...

Im Focus: Perovskite edges can be tuned for optoelectronic performance

Layered 2D material improves efficiency for solar cells and LEDs

In the eternal search for next generation high-efficiency solar cells and LEDs, scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory and their partners are creating...

Im Focus: Polymer-coated silicon nanosheets as alternative to graphene: A perfect team for nanoelectronics

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are less stable. Now researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have, for the first time ever, produced a composite material combining silicon nanosheets and a polymer that is both UV-resistant and easy to process. This brings the scientists a significant step closer to industrial applications like flexible displays and photosensors.

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are...

Im Focus: Researchers Imitate Molecular Crowding in Cells

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to simulate these confined natural conditions in artificial vesicles for the first time. As reported in the academic journal Small, the results are offering better insight into the development of nanoreactors and artificial organelles.

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

International Land Use Symposium ILUS 2017: Call for Abstracts and Registration open

20.03.2017 | Event News

CONNECT 2017: International congress on connective tissue

14.03.2017 | Event News

ICTM Conference: Turbine Construction between Big Data and Additive Manufacturing

07.03.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

When Air is in Short Supply - Shedding light on plant stress reactions when oxygen runs short

23.03.2017 | Life Sciences

Researchers use light to remotely control curvature of plastics

23.03.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Sea ice extent sinks to record lows at both poles

23.03.2017 | Earth Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>