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Gas leak detector

11.12.2002


Micro-sensors, developed by the CEIT Technology Centre with the help of Gas de Euskadi, operate by detecting gas leaks and reducing the risks of poisoning through the inhalation of carbon monoxide gas.



Through research involving help from Gas de Euskadi, CEIT has developed a system based on micro-sensors that can detect domestic gas leaks. The increasing use of natural gas in homes, the future regulations for carbon monoxide detection in domestic situations and the growing demand for gas detectors have been the main reasons why the young researcher from CEIT, Gemma García Mandayo, has directed her research to techniques for the creation of tin oxide micro-sensors.

In order to both prevent gas leaks and avoid carbon monoxide formation, the correct installation and the suitable maintenance of gas appliances are essential, and equally so their compliance with the relevant standards and regulations. Nevertheless, with the aim of increasing safety, the systems that have been developed significantly reduce the possibility and risk of both explosions due to leaks of methane (main component of natural gas) and, likewise, of poisoning due to the presence of carbon monoxide, a colourless, odourless gas.


Given its characteristics, it is impossible to detect carbon monoxide without the presence of a sensor. Correct ventilation of those spaces where combustion is carried out is an important preventative measure, despite the fact that there is always a risk of accumulation of this gas, given its high density and its lack of colour or smell. The Journal of the American Medical Association has pointed out that carbon monoxide is the principal cause of accidental death in the United States of America.

The researchers at CEIT have started on the design of the gas micro-sensor. This involves the incorporation of a heater in order to apply the tin oxide film at a temperature of 300° C, the temperature at which the carbon monoxide is detected.


Contact :
Alvaro Vilallonga
CEIT
avilallonga@ceit.es
(+34) 943 21 28 00

Alvaro Vilallonga | BasqueResearch
Further information:
http://www.basqueresearch.com/

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