Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:


World Record for One-Loop Calculations

Physicists at Mainz University significantly improve the calculation method for scattering experiments in particle physics

Scientists at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) have set a new record for the calculation of scattering amplitudes. This kind of calculation is used to predict the outcome of accelerator experiments in which high-energy particles collide with one another.

This Feynman diagram illustrates the collision between an electron and positron (left), with their annihilation and the formation of a quark, an anti-quark, and five gluons (right).
Ill.: THEP, Mainz

However, the calculations become increasingly difficult the greater the number of orders the physicists wish to calculate. Professor Dr. Stefan Weinzierl's work group has now developed an algorithm which is far faster and requires less computing capacity than other algorithms. "We have made a huge leap forward and applied a completely new method allowing us to calculate far more than before," explains Weinzierl. He assumes that the new calculation method can be applied to both completed experiments in the Large Electron-Positron Collider (LEP), which was in operation at Geneva's CERN research center until the year 2000, as well as new experiments in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC).

The new algorithm allows, for instance, for the calculation of physical observables related to the collision of an electron with its antiparticle, the positron, during which a quark, an anti-quark, and gluons are created. For the first time ever, it has been possible to do a calculation with one loop and eight external particles – a new world record in theoretical high-energy physics.

Precision calculations in particle physics make use of the perturbation theory and the results can be displayed in what are called loop diagrams. The higher the number of external particles, the more difficult is the calculation. The algorithm now being used is a new and efficient method based on subtraction and numerical integration. The calculations are performed using a PC cluster system located at the Center of Data Processing at Mainz University. According to Weinzierl, the new method is not only applicable to electron-positron annihilation, but with slight modifications can also be used to calculate hadron-hadron collisions of the kind that occur in the LHC in Geneva. The theoretical physicists at Mainz University intend to investigate this aspect further in the near future.

Professor Dr. Stefan Weinzierl's work is part of the JGU Excellence Cluster Precision Physics, Fundamental Interactions and Structure of Matter (PRISMA). The cluster has made it into the final selection round of Germany's Federal Excellence Initiative and has submitted a proposal for continued financing in the second round.

Petra Giegerich | idw
Further information:

More articles from Physics and Astronomy:

nachricht Researchers at Fraunhofer monitor re-entry of Chinese space station Tiangong-1
21.03.2018 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Hochfrequenzphysik und Radartechnik FHR

nachricht Taming chaos: Calculating probability in complex systems
21.03.2018 | American Institute of Physics

All articles from Physics and Astronomy >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Researchers Discover New Anti-Cancer Protein

An international team of researchers has discovered a new anti-cancer protein. The protein, called LHPP, prevents the uncontrolled proliferation of cancer cells in the liver. The researchers led by Prof. Michael N. Hall from the Biozentrum, University of Basel, report in “Nature” that LHPP can also serve as a biomarker for the diagnosis and prognosis of liver cancer.

The incidence of liver cancer, also known as hepatocellular carcinoma, is steadily increasing. In the last twenty years, the number of cases has almost doubled...

Im Focus: Researchers at Fraunhofer monitor re-entry of Chinese space station Tiangong-1

In just a few weeks from now, the Chinese space station Tiangong-1 will re-enter the Earth's atmosphere where it will to a large extent burn up. It is possible that some debris will reach the Earth's surface. Tiangong-1 is orbiting the Earth uncontrolled at a speed of approx. 29,000 km/h.Currently the prognosis relating to the time of impact currently lies within a window of several days. The scientists at Fraunhofer FHR have already been monitoring Tiangong-1 for a number of weeks with their TIRA system, one of the most powerful space observation radars in the world, with a view to supporting the German Space Situational Awareness Center and the ESA with their re-entry forecasts.

Following the loss of radio contact with Tiangong-1 in 2016 and due to the low orbital height, it is now inevitable that the Chinese space station will...

Im Focus: Alliance „OLED Licht Forum“ – Key partner for OLED lighting solutions

Fraunhofer Institute for Organic Electronics, Electron Beam and Plasma Technology FEP, provider of research and development services for OLED lighting solutions, announces the founding of the “OLED Licht Forum” and presents latest OLED design and lighting solutions during light+building, from March 18th – 23rd, 2018 in Frankfurt a.M./Germany, at booth no. F91 in Hall 4.0.

They are united in their passion for OLED (organic light emitting diodes) lighting with all of its unique facets and application possibilities. Thus experts in...

Im Focus: Mars' oceans formed early, possibly aided by massive volcanic eruptions

Oceans formed before Tharsis and evolved together, shaping climate history of Mars

A new scenario seeking to explain how Mars' putative oceans came and went over the last 4 billion years implies that the oceans formed several hundred million...

Im Focus: Tiny implants for cells are functional in vivo

For the first time, an interdisciplinary team from the University of Basel has succeeded in integrating artificial organelles into the cells of live zebrafish embryos. This innovative approach using artificial organelles as cellular implants offers new potential in treating a range of diseases, as the authors report in an article published in Nature Communications.

In the cells of higher organisms, organelles such as the nucleus or mitochondria perform a range of complex functions necessary for life. In the networks of...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>



Industry & Economy
Event News

Virtual reality conference comes to Reutlingen

19.03.2018 | Event News

Ultrafast Wireless and Chip Design at the DATE Conference in Dresden

16.03.2018 | Event News

International Tinnitus Conference of the Tinnitus Research Initiative in Regensburg

13.03.2018 | Event News

Latest News

Custom sequences for polymers using visible light

22.03.2018 | Materials Sciences

Scientists develop tiny tooth-mounted sensors that can track what you eat

22.03.2018 | Health and Medicine

Mat baits, hooks and destroys pollutants in water

22.03.2018 | Earth Sciences

Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>