Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:


Nuclear physics incorporates a 'strange' flavor

Calculating the binding energy between hyperon particles contributes to understanding a new type of neutron star

In 2009, physicists from Japan’s KEK high-energy proton accelerator announced the sighting of a rare event: an unusually bulky beryllium nucleus that, in addition to four protons and five neutrons, contained two particles called ‘hyperons’.

Now, Emiko Hiyama at the RIKEN Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, Wako, and her colleagues from several Japanese universities have presented a calculation that provides the most precise description available of the interactions between nuclei and hyperons in the double-hyperon beryllium nucleus observed at KEK1.

Hyperons—particles that contain at least one so-called ‘strange’ quark—exist for less than a billionth of a second before they decay. Scientists know relatively little about how hyperons interact with matter, but speculate that the hot, dense environment of a neutron star would allow these particles to exist in an almost stable state. If they are correct, a hyperon neutron star would be a new state of matter.

According to Hiyama, one of the main interests of hypernuclear physics is to understand interactions between baryons—particles such as protons and neutrons that consist of three quarks—and other particles. “Our study will contribute to understanding such interactions at the core of a neutron star.”

Quarks come in six so-called ‘flavors’: up, down, strange, charm, bottom and top. Only the up and down quarks, which make up the protons and neutrons in atomic nuclei, are stable. High-energy collisions, such as those performed at KEK, are needed to produce the hyperons that contain the more massive strange quark.

Finding the interactions between the eleven particles that constitute the double-hyperon beryllium nucleus is prohibitively difficult. To simplify the calculation of this ‘many-body’ problem, Hiyama and her colleagues approximated the double-hyperon nucleus as five particles: two helium nuclei, one neutron and the two hyperon particles (Fig. 1). This allowed them to predict the energy that binds the two hyperons together in the nucleus and compare their theoretical results with experimental data. Their calculations indicated that hyperons act to shrink the beryllium nucleus—an unusual effect, since nuclei are normally considered incompressible.

Hiyama’s calculations will be an essential tool to understand the attractive forces between hyperons in a neutron star, and will help researchers to analyze experimental results at Japan’s new proton accelerator complex, J-PARC, which is expected to produce multiple double-hyperon nuclei.

“At present, the only way to determine the energy of the hypernucleon is to perform these accurate many-body calculations,” says Hiyama.

The corresponding author for this highlight is based at the Strangeness Nuclear Physics Laboratory, RIKEN Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science

Journal information

1. Hiyama, E., Kamimura, M., Yamamoto, Y. & Motoba, T. Five-body cluster structure of the double-Ë hypernucleus 11ËËBe. Physical Review Letters 104, 212502 (2010)

gro-pr | Research asia research news
Further information:

More articles from Physics and Astronomy:

nachricht Scientists discover particles similar to Majorana fermions
25.10.2016 | Chinese Academy of Sciences Headquarters

nachricht Light-driven atomic rotations excite magnetic waves
24.10.2016 | Max-Planck-Institut für Struktur und Dynamik der Materie

All articles from Physics and Astronomy >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Etching Microstructures with Lasers

Ultrafast lasers have introduced new possibilities in engraving ultrafine structures, and scientists are now also investigating how to use them to etch microstructures into thin glass. There are possible applications in analytics (lab on a chip) and especially in electronics and the consumer sector, where great interest has been shown.

This new method was born of a surprising phenomenon: irradiating glass in a particular way with an ultrafast laser has the effect of making the glass up to a...

Im Focus: Light-driven atomic rotations excite magnetic waves

Terahertz excitation of selected crystal vibrations leads to an effective magnetic field that drives coherent spin motion

Controlling functional properties by light is one of the grand goals in modern condensed matter physics and materials science. A new study now demonstrates how...

Im Focus: New 3-D wiring technique brings scalable quantum computers closer to reality

Researchers from the Institute for Quantum Computing (IQC) at the University of Waterloo led the development of a new extensible wiring technique capable of controlling superconducting quantum bits, representing a significant step towards to the realization of a scalable quantum computer.

"The quantum socket is a wiring method that uses three-dimensional wires based on spring-loaded pins to address individual qubits," said Jeremy Béjanin, a PhD...

Im Focus: Scientists develop a semiconductor nanocomposite material that moves in response to light

In a paper in Scientific Reports, a research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute describes a novel light-activated phenomenon that could become the basis for applications as diverse as microscopic robotic grippers and more efficient solar cells.

A research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) has developed a revolutionary, light-activated semiconductor nanocomposite material that can be used...

Im Focus: Diamonds aren't forever: Sandia, Harvard team create first quantum computer bridge

By forcefully embedding two silicon atoms in a diamond matrix, Sandia researchers have demonstrated for the first time on a single chip all the components needed to create a quantum bridge to link quantum computers together.

"People have already built small quantum computers," says Sandia researcher Ryan Camacho. "Maybe the first useful one won't be a single giant quantum computer...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>



Event News

#IC2S2: When Social Science meets Computer Science - GESIS will host the IC2S2 conference 2017

14.10.2016 | Event News

Agricultural Trade Developments and Potentials in Central Asia and the South Caucasus

14.10.2016 | Event News

World Health Summit – Day Three: A Call to Action

12.10.2016 | Event News

Latest News

Ice shelf vibrations cause unusual waves in Antarctic atmosphere

25.10.2016 | Earth Sciences

Fluorescent holography: Upending the world of biological imaging

25.10.2016 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Etching Microstructures with Lasers

25.10.2016 | Process Engineering

More VideoLinks >>>