Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Manipulating the texture of magnetism

06.02.2012
Derivation of equations that describe the dynamics of complex magnetic quasi-particles may aid the design of novel electronic devices
Knowing how to control the combined magnetic properties of interacting electrons will provide the basis to develop an important tool for advancing spintronics: a technology that aims to harness these properties for computation and communication. As a crucial first step, Naoto Nagaosa from the RIKEN Advanced Science Institute, Wako, and his colleagues have derived the equations that govern the motion of these magnetic quasi-particles1.

The magnetic behavior of a material is a result of a phenomenon known as spin. This can be thought of as the rotation of electrons and is usually visualized as an arrow pointing along the rotation axis. In some crystalline solids, neighboring electron spins can interact with each other such that the arrows form vortex-like patterns (Fig. 1). This spin ‘texture’ is robust and remains intact despite outside influences; it can also move through the material crystal, even though the atoms themselves remain stationary. Because of these properties, physicists often think of such spin vortices as particles in their own right; they call them skyrmions. The work of Nagaosa, with researchers from China, the Netherlands and Korea, provides a theoretical framework that describes skyrmion dynamics.

Skyrmions, and the ability to control them, have the potential to increase the packing density of magnetic recording media; as such, skyrmion-based devices are likely to be more efficient than conventional memories. “Skyrmions can be moved with a current density as much as a million times smaller than those needed to control magnetic structures, thus far,” explains Nagaosa.

The researchers theoretically investigated skyrmion crystals—ordered arrays of many skyrmions—that are supported by thin metallic films. Nagaosa and his collaborators2 had suggested previously that skyrmion crystals are more stable in thin films than they are in thicker ‘bulk’ materials, making films more amenable to practical applications. The equations of motion derived by Nagaosa and colleagues also showed: how the electrons are influenced by skyrmions; that skyrmions can become pinned to impurities in the film; and that the skyrmion trajectory bends away from the direction of an electrical current. The researchers called this phenomenon the skyrmion Hall effect because of its similarity to the sideways force that is exerted on an electron as it moves through a conductor in a magnetic field, which was discovered by Edwin Hall in 1879.
“Next we intend to study the effect of thermal fluctuations of the skyrmion structure and the optical manipulation of skyrmions,” says Nagaosa. “These are the important issues on the road towards applications.”

The corresponding author for this highlight is based at the Theoretical Design Team, RIKEN Advanced Science Institute

gro-pr | Research asia research news
Further information:
http://www.riken.jp
http://www.researchsea.com

More articles from Physics and Astronomy:

nachricht Basque researchers turn light upside down
23.02.2018 | Elhuyar Fundazioa

nachricht Attoseconds break into atomic interior
23.02.2018 | Max-Planck-Institut für Quantenoptik

All articles from Physics and Astronomy >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Attoseconds break into atomic interior

A newly developed laser technology has enabled physicists in the Laboratory for Attosecond Physics (jointly run by LMU Munich and the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics) to generate attosecond bursts of high-energy photons of unprecedented intensity. This has made it possible to observe the interaction of multiple photons in a single such pulse with electrons in the inner orbital shell of an atom.

In order to observe the ultrafast electron motion in the inner shells of atoms with short light pulses, the pulses must not only be ultrashort, but very...

Im Focus: Good vibrations feel the force

A group of researchers led by Andrea Cavalleri at the Max Planck Institute for Structure and Dynamics of Matter (MPSD) in Hamburg has demonstrated a new method enabling precise measurements of the interatomic forces that hold crystalline solids together. The paper Probing the Interatomic Potential of Solids by Strong-Field Nonlinear Phononics, published online in Nature, explains how a terahertz-frequency laser pulse can drive very large deformations of the crystal.

By measuring the highly unusual atomic trajectories under extreme electromagnetic transients, the MPSD group could reconstruct how rigid the atomic bonds are...

Im Focus: Developing reliable quantum computers

International research team makes important step on the path to solving certification problems

Quantum computers may one day solve algorithmic problems which even the biggest supercomputers today can’t manage. But how do you test a quantum computer to...

Im Focus: In best circles: First integrated circuit from self-assembled polymer

For the first time, a team of researchers at the Max-Planck Institute (MPI) for Polymer Research in Mainz, Germany, has succeeded in making an integrated circuit (IC) from just a monolayer of a semiconducting polymer via a bottom-up, self-assembly approach.

In the self-assembly process, the semiconducting polymer arranges itself into an ordered monolayer in a transistor. The transistors are binary switches used...

Im Focus: Demonstration of a single molecule piezoelectric effect

Breakthrough provides a new concept of the design of molecular motors, sensors and electricity generators at nanoscale

Researchers from the Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry of the CAS (IOCB Prague), Institute of Physics of the CAS (IP CAS) and Palacký University...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

2nd International Conference on High Temperature Shape Memory Alloys (HTSMAs)

15.02.2018 | Event News

Aachen DC Grid Summit 2018

13.02.2018 | Event News

How Global Climate Policy Can Learn from the Energy Transition

12.02.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Basque researchers turn light upside down

23.02.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

Finnish research group discovers a new immune system regulator

23.02.2018 | Health and Medicine

Attoseconds break into atomic interior

23.02.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>