Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Two Galaxies for the Price of One

03.12.2013
Surprising Image Reveals New Tool to Study Magnetic Fields of Galaxies

An international group of astronomers, including Marita Krause and Rainer Beck from Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie (MPIfR) in Bonn, has found a surprising and useful new probe of galactic magnetic fields. While studying gas halos around nearby galaxies, they were surprised when detailed studies with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) showed that one of their subjects is not a single galaxy, but rather two, nearly perfectly superimposed on the sky to masquerade as one. The discovery allowed them to use the alignment to learn otherwise-unobtainable facts about the nearer galaxy.


The edge-on spiral galaxy UGC 10288 (horizontal) appeared to be a single object in previous radio telescope observations. However, new, detailed radio data (cyan in this image) from the NRAO's VLA reveals that the large perpendicular (vertical) extension really is a distant background galaxy with radio jets. The foreground image of UGC 10288 includes data from optical, infrared and radio telescopes. While radio data are blue, infrared observations from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope and Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) are yellow and orange, respectively. Optical data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey are purplish blue and show starlight; and optical data from the Kitt Peak National Observatory are rose and show heated gas.

© Jayanne English (University of Manitoba, Kanada), Judith Irwin (Queen's University, Kanada), Richard Rand, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, and members of CHANG-ES consortium, NRAO VLA, NASA/JPL-Caltech WISE & Spitzer, NOAO, and SDSS.


This image of UGC 10288, the foreground spiral galaxy, includes data from NASA's WISE (far-infrared; orange) and Spitzer (near-infrared; yellow) space observatories, the Kitt Peak National Observatory's 0.9m telescope (ionized hydrogen; rose), and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (optical; purplish-blue), and NRAO's VLA (radio; cyan).

© see Fig. 1

As part of a study of 35 galaxies, the astronomers observed one called UGC 10288, a spiral galaxy more than 100 million light-years distant that appears edge-on as seen from Earth. Their multiple VLA observations in 2011 and 2012 produced the best radio-telescope images of that galaxy ever made. The detailed images surprisingly revealed a more-distant galaxy, with strong radio emission, almost directly behind UGC 10288. In previous images, the two galaxies had been blended together. It is probably the first detection of an alignment of a foreground galaxy with such a strongly- emitting background galaxy with extended jets. The background galaxy is much further away, in a distance of nearly 7 billion light-years from Earth.

"This changed the picture, quite literally," says Judith Irwin, of Queen's University in Ontario, Canada. "It changed our understanding of the characteristics of UGC 10288, but also gave us an unexpected new tool for learning more about that galaxy."

The first insight gleaned from the improved images was that UGC 10288 is not forming stars as rapidly as the astronomers first thought. This is because much of the radio emission in the previous, blended images came from the background galaxy.

The new images also showed that the gas in the galaxy's "outskirts," high above its spiral disk does not form a smooth halo-like envelope as result of an extremely low star formation rate.

The background galaxy, and the fact that it is aligned with its radio jets perpendicular to UGC 10288's disk, provides a valuable means of studying the nearer galaxy. "We can use the radio waves from the background galaxy, coming through the nearer one, as a way to measure the properties of the nearer galaxy," says Jayanne English, of the University of Manitoba.

“The use of the more distant galaxy as a background candle has given us the opportunity of magnetic-field measurements in different areas of UGC 10288,” explains Marita Krause from the Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie in Bonn, Germany. “Since the background galaxy is vertically orientated, we can study the magnetic field of the foreground galaxy from the disk up to regions high above.”

The researchers could measure the magnetic field via the effect of Faraday rotation which rotates the polarization plane of the radio emission of the background galaxy within the foreground galaxy.

"Ironically, the radio brightness of UGC 10288 alone is too weak to be included in the original sample, had it not been boosted by the unresolved background galaxy in earlier images," concludes Rainer Beck, also from Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie. “We would have missed an excellent opportunity for magnetic field studies via extended background sources.”

Marita Krause and Rainer Beck, both from Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie (MPIfR), Bonn, Germany, worked with an international team of astronomers from North America, Europe, and India who are part of the Continuum Halos in Nearby Galaxies - an EVLA Survey (CHANG-ES) consortium, led by Judith Irwin. The scientists report their findings in the December issue of the Astronomical Journal.

The National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) is a facility of the National Science Foundation, operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc.

Contact

Dr. Marita Krause
Phone:+49 228 525-312
Email:mkrause@mpifr-bonn.mpg.de
Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie, Bonn
Dr. Rainer Beck
Phone:+49 228 525-323
Email:rbeck@mpifr-bonn.mpg.de
Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie, Bonn
Dr. Norbert Junkes
Presse- und Öffentlichkeitsarbeit
Phone:+49 228 525-399
Email:njunkes@mpifr-bonn.mpg.de
Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie, Bonn
Original Paper
CHANG-ES III: UGC10288 – An Edge-on Galaxy with a Background Double-lobed Radio Source

Judith Irwin, Marita Krause, Jayanne English, Rainer Beck, Eric Murphy, Theresa Wiegert, George Heald, Rene Walterbos, Richard J. Rand, and Troy Porter, 2013, Astronomical Journal 146, 164 (eprint arXiv:1311.3894)

Dr. Norbert Junkes | Max-Planck-Institut
Further information:
http://www.mpifr-bonn.mpg.de/pressreleases/2013/12

More articles from Physics and Astronomy:

nachricht The material that obscures supermassive black holes
26.09.2017 | Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC)

nachricht Creative use of noise brings bio-inspired electronic improvement
26.09.2017 | American Institute of Physics

All articles from Physics and Astronomy >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: The fastest light-driven current source

Controlling electronic current is essential to modern electronics, as data and signals are transferred by streams of electrons which are controlled at high speed. Demands on transmission speeds are also increasing as technology develops. Scientists from the Chair of Laser Physics and the Chair of Applied Physics at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) have succeeded in switching on a current with a desired direction in graphene using a single laser pulse within a femtosecond ¬¬ – a femtosecond corresponds to the millionth part of a billionth of a second. This is more than a thousand times faster compared to the most efficient transistors today.

Graphene is up to the job

Im Focus: LaserTAB: More efficient and precise contacts thanks to human-robot collaboration

At the productronica trade fair in Munich this November, the Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT will be presenting Laser-Based Tape-Automated Bonding, LaserTAB for short. The experts from Aachen will be demonstrating how new battery cells and power electronics can be micro-welded more efficiently and precisely than ever before thanks to new optics and robot support.

Fraunhofer ILT from Aachen relies on a clever combination of robotics and a laser scanner with new optics as well as process monitoring, which it has developed...

Im Focus: The pyrenoid is a carbon-fixing liquid droplet

Plants and algae use the enzyme Rubisco to fix carbon dioxide, removing it from the atmosphere and converting it into biomass. Algae have figured out a way to increase the efficiency of carbon fixation. They gather most of their Rubisco into a ball-shaped microcompartment called the pyrenoid, which they flood with a high local concentration of carbon dioxide. A team of scientists at Princeton University, the Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford University and the Max Plank Institute of Biochemistry have unravelled the mysteries of how the pyrenoid is assembled. These insights can help to engineer crops that remove more carbon dioxide from the atmosphere while producing more food.

A warming planet

Im Focus: Highly precise wiring in the Cerebral Cortex

Our brains house extremely complex neuronal circuits, whose detailed structures are still largely unknown. This is especially true for the so-called cerebral cortex of mammals, where among other things vision, thoughts or spatial orientation are being computed. Here the rules by which nerve cells are connected to each other are only partly understood. A team of scientists around Moritz Helmstaedter at the Frankfiurt Max Planck Institute for Brain Research and Helene Schmidt (Humboldt University in Berlin) have now discovered a surprisingly precise nerve cell connectivity pattern in the part of the cerebral cortex that is responsible for orienting the individual animal or human in space.

The researchers report online in Nature (Schmidt et al., 2017. Axonal synapse sorting in medial entorhinal cortex, DOI: 10.1038/nature24005) that synapses in...

Im Focus: Tiny lasers from a gallery of whispers

New technique promises tunable laser devices

Whispering gallery mode (WGM) resonators are used to make tiny micro-lasers, sensors, switches, routers and other devices. These tiny structures rely on a...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

“Lasers in Composites Symposium” in Aachen – from Science to Application

19.09.2017 | Event News

I-ESA 2018 – Call for Papers

12.09.2017 | Event News

EMBO at Basel Life, a new conference on current and emerging life science research

06.09.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Goodbye, login. Hello, heart scan

26.09.2017 | Information Technology

The material that obscures supermassive black holes

26.09.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Ageless ears? Elderly barn owls do not become hard of hearing

26.09.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>