Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Breakthrough Could Change Sampling Technology Forever

27.01.2010
Researchers from the Technion-Israel institute of Technology have made a breakthrough that could revolutionize the way broadband signals are sampled, recorded and processed. The breakthrough could someday be used to make significant improvements in radar capabilities and performance, increase the capacity of audio recording devices, and reduce patient exposure to radiation during such procedures as MRIs, x-rays and CT-scans.

“Sampling” technology is central to the operation of these devices and in general to the field of digital communications. Increasing the bandwidth of the signals that can be sampled while maintaining a low sampling rate would increase the capabilities of these devices.

“In digital devices, physical signals (images, sounds, etc.) are stored using a series of bits,” explains Prof. Yonina Eldar of the Faculty of Electrical Engineering. “The goal of the sampling stage is to cleverly convert a physical signal into bits of data (a series of zeros and ones) in such a way that the true underlying signal can later be recovered. This recovery is performed in the reconstruction process, in which the bits are translated back into a physical signal that can be heard or seen.”

Using only commercially available components, the team led by Prof. Eldar has built a patented prototype that far exceeds basic established limits for sampling by hundreds of percentages. It also precludes the need for processors with high computational capabilities.

Until the Technion breakthrough, it was believed that exact reconstruction of a signal with unknown spectral support using digital processing was possible only if it was sampled at a rate twice the maximum frequency of the signal (as established in 1949 by the Nyquist-Shannon sampling theorem).

Under Prof. Eldar’s supervision, graduate student Moshe Mishali set out to design a single sampling system for signals with multiple, broadband channels. Doing so successfully would make it possible to sample and reconstruct those signals perfectly at significantly lower rates than existing samplers. According to Prof. Eldar, the breakthrough was achieved by utilizing the fact that there is no broadcasting in parts of the spectrum.

“The idea is to wisely use the ‘holes’ in the spectrum in order to significantly lower the sampling rate without damaging the signal,” explains Prof. Eldar. “The difficulty lies in the fact that since we do not know where in the spectrum these holes are placed, traditional mathematical models can no longer be used to characterize and manipulate such signals. What we were able to prove is that the mere fact that we know the signal does not occupy the entire spectrum, enables reducing the sampling rate, something that was not possible until now.”

The Technion-Israel Institute of Technology is Israel's leading science and technology university. Home to the country's winners of the Nobel Prize in science, it commands a worldwide reputation for its pioneering work in nanotechnology, computer science, biotechnology, water-resource management, materials engineering, aerospace and medicine. The majority of the founders and managers of Israel's high-tech companies are alumni. Based in New York City, the American Technion Society (ATS) is the leading American organization supporting higher education in Israel, with offices around the country.

Kevin Hattori | Newswise Science News
Further information:
http://www.ats.org

More articles from Physics and Astronomy:

nachricht Astronomers find unexpected, dust-obscured star formation in distant galaxy
24.03.2017 | University of Massachusetts at Amherst

nachricht Gravitational wave kicks monster black hole out of galactic core
24.03.2017 | NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

All articles from Physics and Astronomy >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Giant Magnetic Fields in the Universe

Astronomers from Bonn and Tautenburg in Thuringia (Germany) used the 100-m radio telescope at Effelsberg to observe several galaxy clusters. At the edges of these large accumulations of dark matter, stellar systems (galaxies), hot gas, and charged particles, they found magnetic fields that are exceptionally ordered over distances of many million light years. This makes them the most extended magnetic fields in the universe known so far.

The results will be published on March 22 in the journal „Astronomy & Astrophysics“.

Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound structures in the universe. With a typical extent of about 10 million light years, i.e. 100 times the...

Im Focus: Tracing down linear ubiquitination

Researchers at the Goethe University Frankfurt, together with partners from the University of Tübingen in Germany and Queen Mary University as well as Francis Crick Institute from London (UK) have developed a novel technology to decipher the secret ubiquitin code.

Ubiquitin is a small protein that can be linked to other cellular proteins, thereby controlling and modulating their functions. The attachment occurs in many...

Im Focus: Perovskite edges can be tuned for optoelectronic performance

Layered 2D material improves efficiency for solar cells and LEDs

In the eternal search for next generation high-efficiency solar cells and LEDs, scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory and their partners are creating...

Im Focus: Polymer-coated silicon nanosheets as alternative to graphene: A perfect team for nanoelectronics

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are less stable. Now researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have, for the first time ever, produced a composite material combining silicon nanosheets and a polymer that is both UV-resistant and easy to process. This brings the scientists a significant step closer to industrial applications like flexible displays and photosensors.

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are...

Im Focus: Researchers Imitate Molecular Crowding in Cells

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to simulate these confined natural conditions in artificial vesicles for the first time. As reported in the academic journal Small, the results are offering better insight into the development of nanoreactors and artificial organelles.

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

International Land Use Symposium ILUS 2017: Call for Abstracts and Registration open

20.03.2017 | Event News

CONNECT 2017: International congress on connective tissue

14.03.2017 | Event News

ICTM Conference: Turbine Construction between Big Data and Additive Manufacturing

07.03.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Northern oceans pumped CO2 into the atmosphere

27.03.2017 | Earth Sciences

Fingerprint' technique spots frog populations at risk from pollution

27.03.2017 | Life Sciences

Big data approach to predict protein structure

27.03.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>