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New treatment shows promise against recurrent gynecologic cancers

23.04.2009
Possible new treatment option for women

Recurrent and metastatic endometrial and ovarian cancers can be notoriously difficult to treat: They have spread to other organs and typically have developed resistance to chemotherapy; and patients already heavily treated with chemotherapy may not be able to endure more chemo.

Now, physicians at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University have shown that a combination of two chemotherapy drugs not only produced clinical benefit for such patients but were also well tolerated. The findings are published online in the journal Gynecologic Oncology.

"Women with recurrent gynecologic cancers have often had multiple rounds of chemotherapy, which can cause tumor cells to develop resistance to these drugs," says Mark H. Einstein, M.D., associate professor of obstetrics & gynecology and women's health at Einstein, who headed the study. "This resistance can make it difficult for doctors to devise a treatment protocol that will impact the cancers while avoiding the often-severe side effects that certain chemotherapy drugs can cause, particularly when patients have already been heavily pretreated with other anti-cancer drugs."

In previous clinical studies, the chemotherapy drugs topotecan and docetaxel showed effectiveness when used separately against recurrent gynecologic cancers. The phase 2 trial conducted by Dr. Einstein and his colleagues©¤the first to evaluate the combination of the drugs for this purpose©¤involved 24 women with recurrent uterine, ovarian, fallopian or peritoneal cancers. The women were given the topotecan-docetaxel combination on Day 1 of the trial and then weekly for three weeks; after a one-week rest, the women received another three-week treatment cycle, ultimately undergoing six such treatment cycles.

Compared with previous clinical trials, an unusually high proportion of these women had been heavily pretreated with chemotherapy©¤yet nearly 40 percent of them experienced clinical benefit. In addition, the overall survival with the drug combination (median survival of 18.5 months) was higher than in previous phase 2 studies that evaluated the drugs when used singly. Finally, there were few and relatively mild side effects from the drug combination compared with toxicities observed in similar studies.

The trial's effectiveness and safety outcomes are "promising enough to justify a larger clinical study of this drug combination for women with recurrent gynecologic cancers," Dr. Einstein says.

Other researchers at Einstein involved in the trial were Divya Gupta, M.D., Ricky L. Owers, M.D., Mimi Kim, Sc.D., Dennis Yi-Shin Kuo, M.D., Gloria S. Huang, M.D., Shohreh Shahabi, M.D., and Gary L. Goldberg, M.D.

Dr. Einstein's research was funded, in part, by investigator-initiated grants from Sanofi-Aventis and GlaxoSmithKline Oncology for research-related costs of this trial.

About Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University

Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University is one of the nation's premier centers for research, medical education and clinical investigation. It is the home to some 2,000 faculty members, 750 M.D. students, 350 Ph.D. students (including 125 in combined M.D./Ph.D. programs) and 380 postdoctoral investigators. Last year, Einstein received more than $130 million in support from the NIH. This includes the funding of major research centers at Einstein in diabetes, cancer, liver disease, and AIDS. Other areas where the College of Medicine is concentrating its efforts include developmental brain research, neuroscience, cardiac disease, and initiatives to reduce and eliminate ethnic and racial health disparities. Through its extensive affiliation network involving five hospital centers in the Bronx, Manhattan and Long Island ¨C which includes Montefiore Medical Center, The University Hospital and Academic Medical Center for Einstein ¨C the College runs one of the largest post-graduate medical training program in the United States, offering approximately 150 residency programs to more than 2,500 physicians in training.

Deirdre Branley | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.aecom.yu.edu

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