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First simulation of the the ageing process

18.11.2008
The first simulation of how it feels to age decades in minutes will be run by staff from Eisai at the new University of Hertfordshire simulation centre tomorrow (19 November).

The Elderly Simulation Experience, forms part of a two-day workshop designed by Eisai to provide their staff with a deeper understanding of the experiences of elderly patients.

The staff taking part come from across Europe and are responsible for promoting Eisai’s “Human Health Care” (hhc) mission, which encourages staff to think from the perspective of patients and their families, and so increase the benefits health care provides.

Eisai is committed to developing and providing medicines that are founded on an understanding of directly experiencing the challenges faced by patients. “We hope this simulation of how it feels to be older will help enhance our understanding and empathy for patients – and therefore help us in our work to develop better medicines” said Chihiro Takayama, Executive Director of the Knowledge Creation Department at Eisai Co. Ltd in Japan.

The elements of the simulation to experience “old age” include:

•Earplugs
•Special glasses
•Vest to increase weight
•Elbow supporter and Wrist Weight
•“Old age” simulating Gloves
•Knee Support and Ankle Weight
•Shoes-type Supporter
The event takes place in the Eisai sponsored Community Room at the University of Hertfordshire in the Hertfordshire Intensive Care & Emergency Simulation Centre (HICESC). This room has been set up as a normal household environment, so that student nurses or paramedics can experience what it is like to use emergency equipment on patients in their own home.

For the purposes of this week’s workshop, the facilities in the room and technology provided by Eisai will be used to create an experience of what it would be like to have failing vision and hearing and restricted movement – all inevitable consequences of ageing.

Before going on tours of a local elderly care home and a school for children with special needs, the Eisai team will be shown the facilities in HICESC, which provides training for healthcare practitioners using life-like manikins.

It houses a family of seven patient simulators, two SimMen, SimMidwife, SimChild, SimBaby and most recently, a Nursing Anne and Nursing Kelly with vital signs, all powered by state-of-the art technology.

Eisai, one of the worlds leading pharmaceutical companies, is building a new “European Knowledge Centre” on the Hatfield Business Park which will bring together teams from Research and Development, Manufacturing and Sales and Marketing functions.

“Eisai, a key employer in the local area, has been a major supporter of our new facility,” said Professor Eeva Leinonen, Deputy Vice-Chancellor at the University. “The Eisai Community Room and the research carried out there will allow us to continue to save and enhance lives through providing life-saving skills for healthcare students.”

Emma Roberts | alfa
Further information:
http://www.eisai.co.uk
http://www.herts.ac.uk
http://www.health.herts.ac.uk/hicesc/hicesc/news.ht

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