Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Researcher identifies autism employment resources, tips for people with autism spectrum disorders

13.10.2011
Statistics show that the number of people diagnosed with autism has increased steadily over the past 30 years resulting in a surge in the number of adults with autism graduating from high school.

However, preliminary employment studies indicate that this population may earn less and be employed at a lower rate compared to other people with disabilities. Now, an autism expert at the University of Missouri is identifying employment resources that are available for people with autism and steps employers can take to improve the workplace and hiring process for this population.

“Despite the increase in diagnoses of autism in children, we know very little about autism in adults,” said Scott Standifer, clinical associate professor in the School of Health Professions. “Often, people don’t consider how children with autism will grow up and function outside of school. It is important to find ways for this population to be successful in the work environment.”

Recently, Standifer released the “Fact Sheet on Autism Employment,” which includes information and statistics about the adult autism community, organizations addressing autism employment and resources on workplace accommodations for autism.

Although people with autism often have trouble finding employment, Standifer said there are a number of resources that are available. He provides the following recommendations and tips to assist job seekers and employers:

Use state vocational rehabilitation counselors: One resource that has seen a recent increase in use is state vocational rehabilitation programs. Vocational rehabilitation counselors work with adults with disabilities, including autism, to find career-oriented, competitive paying jobs in their local communities. However, Standifer believes that many in the autism community are unaware of state vocational rehabilitation services.
Find jobs with consistent routine: People with autism are more likely to succeed in roles featuring lots of consistent routine, consistent social interactions and well-defined tasks.
Create accessible work environments: Employers can make small adaptations to the workplace that can make a huge difference for people with autism and improve employment opportunities. For example, people with autism often understand written instructions better than verbal instructions, so employers can provide typed directions, rather than just saying them.

“Making workplaces better for adults with autism often does not require major changes,” Standifer said. “Usually, what makes a workplace better for people with disabilities makes the workplace better for everyone.”

Standifer is working on a “job supports toolkit” to help identify how people with autism could fulfill various roles in the workplace. He has organized the annual Autism Works National Conference to bring together advocates and innovators in employment of adults with autism. Standifer said he foresees the development of an index of options and techniques that vocational rehabilitation professionals and their clients can use to brainstorm more effectively about each person’s individual needs.

To view the fact sheet, visit dps.missouri.edu/Autism/AutismFactSheet2011.pdf. The Autism Works National Conference is March 6 and 7 in St. Louis. For more information, visit: www.facebook.com/pages/Autism-Works/136057253090452.

Emily Martin | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.missouri.edu

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Organ-on-a-chip mimics heart's biomechanical properties
23.02.2017 | Vanderbilt University

nachricht Researchers identify cause of hereditary skeletal muscle disorder
22.02.2017 | Klinikum der Universität München

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Stingless bees have their nests protected by soldiers

24.02.2017 | Life Sciences

New risk factors for anxiety disorders

24.02.2017 | Life Sciences

MWC 2017: 5G Capital Berlin

24.02.2017 | Trade Fair News

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>