Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Research Looks At How South Asian Populations Cope With Cancer

29.11.2007
A recent pilot study suggests that there are differences in the way ethnic groups cope with cancer, and a researcher at the University of Leicester, funded by the Leicestershire and Rutland charity Hope Against Cancer, is to investigate this further.

Karen Lord, who holds the first Nursing Fellowship at the University funded by Hope Against Cancer (formerly The Hope Foundation), is researching the information which British Asian patients need and how they cope and adapt to a diagnosis of cancer.

Miss Lord commented: "It is vitally important to understand how ethnically diverse populations react to a diagnosis of cancer, so that services can be focused to offer the best treatment for the psychological complications such a diagnosis can generate.

"To date, there are few studies investigating this and Hope Against Cancer has recently awarded this Fellowship which will allow us to explore the issue further.

"We seek to establish whether the understanding of the concept of cancer varies between Leicester Asians and Caucasians.

"In addition, the study aims to determine if the way we cope with cancer changes over time. This research will generate important answers to these questions and consequently it will enable us to suggest recommendations for support services for South Asian cancer patients in both community and hospital settings."

Karen Lord has worked in cancer nursing and palliative care for almost 20 years and has a particular interest in supporting patients who are coping with the experience of cancer and its treatment throughout several oncology centres in the UK.

She is working with Dr Paul Symonds, in the University of Leicester’s Department of Cancer Studies and Molecular Medicine.

Wendi Stevens, of Hope Against Cancer, commented: "It is so important that we work together with the South Asian community in the region on this project. We desperately need people from that community to come forward to help, both individuals to take part as case studies, and businesses to offer financial support, so that we can move forward and target treatments and therapies in the most appropriate way to the people who need help."

Since its beginnings in 2002 the Leicestershire and Rutland charity, Hope Against Cancer, has grown in strength and now funds eleven cancer researchers in our local hospitals and universities.

Founded by the late Allison Wilson CBE, following the discovery that she had cancer, The Hope Foundation was set up to promote clinical trials, with all the benefits these bring to cancer care in the region.

One of the region’s consultant oncologists said: "I cannot emphasise enough how difficult it is to get funding to start any research project. In this regard, the Hope Foundation is completely invaluable in providing funding where we have good ideas, some preliminary data, but clearly not enough information yet to go for a big project grant.

"As a clinician, I therefore just want to emphasise how important these opportunities given to us by Hope are, both to promote cancer research in the region and to ensure that our patients really do benefit."

Ather Mirza | alfa
Further information:
http://www.le.ac.uk/press/experts/intro.html

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht PET imaging tracks Zika virus infection, disease progression in mouse model
20.09.2017 | US Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases

nachricht 'Exciting' discovery on path to develop new type of vaccine to treat global viruses
18.09.2017 | University of Southampton

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Tiny lasers from a gallery of whispers

New technique promises tunable laser devices

Whispering gallery mode (WGM) resonators are used to make tiny micro-lasers, sensors, switches, routers and other devices. These tiny structures rely on a...

Im Focus: Ultrafast snapshots of relaxing electrons in solids

Using ultrafast flashes of laser and x-ray radiation, scientists at the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics (Garching, Germany) took snapshots of the briefest electron motion inside a solid material to date. The electron motion lasted only 750 billionths of the billionth of a second before it fainted, setting a new record of human capability to capture ultrafast processes inside solids!

When x-rays shine onto solid materials or large molecules, an electron is pushed away from its original place near the nucleus of the atom, leaving a hole...

Im Focus: Quantum Sensors Decipher Magnetic Ordering in a New Semiconducting Material

For the first time, physicists have successfully imaged spiral magnetic ordering in a multiferroic material. These materials are considered highly promising candidates for future data storage media. The researchers were able to prove their findings using unique quantum sensors that were developed at Basel University and that can analyze electromagnetic fields on the nanometer scale. The results – obtained by scientists from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics, the Swiss Nanoscience Institute, the University of Montpellier and several laboratories from University Paris-Saclay – were recently published in the journal Nature.

Multiferroics are materials that simultaneously react to electric and magnetic fields. These two properties are rarely found together, and their combined...

Im Focus: Fast, convenient & standardized: New lab innovation for automated tissue engineering & drug

MBM ScienceBridge GmbH successfully negotiated a license agreement between University Medical Center Göttingen (UMG) and the biotech company Tissue Systems Holding GmbH about commercial use of a multi-well tissue plate for automated and reliable tissue engineering & drug testing.

MBM ScienceBridge GmbH successfully negotiated a license agreement between University Medical Center Göttingen (UMG) and the biotech company Tissue Systems...

Im Focus: Silencing bacteria

HZI researchers pave the way for new agents that render hospital pathogens mute

Pathogenic bacteria are becoming resistant to common antibiotics to an ever increasing degree. One of the most difficult germs is Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

“Lasers in Composites Symposium” in Aachen – from Science to Application

19.09.2017 | Event News

I-ESA 2018 – Call for Papers

12.09.2017 | Event News

EMBO at Basel Life, a new conference on current and emerging life science research

06.09.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Molecular Force Sensors

20.09.2017 | Life Sciences

Producing electricity during flight

20.09.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Tiny lasers from a gallery of whispers

20.09.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>