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Ibuprofen can slow lung disease in children with cystic fibrosis

05.09.2007
The results of a clinical trial, published in late August in the Journal of Pediatrics, indicates that, when used as part of routine therapy, high-dose ibuprofen is safe, and effective in slowing down lung disease in children with cystic fibrosis (CF).

Headed by Dr. Larry Lands, Director of Pediatric Respiratory Medicine at Montreal Children’s Hospital of the McGill University Health Centre, the multi-centre study monitored 142 children aged six to 18 with mild lung disease over two years.

Children given high-dose ibuprofen twice a day showed a significant reduction in the rate of decline in lung function, and had fewer and shorter hospital stays.

“Slowing the rate of the decline of lung function will result in enhanced longevity and quality of life for patients with CF,” said Dr. Larry Lands.

“Many treatments for cystic fibrosis can be a financial hardship for families,” said Cathleen Morrison, Chief Executive Officer at the Canadian Cystic Fibrosis Foundation. “News that ibuprofen – a relatively inexpensive treatment compared to other therapies for CF – is effective, is very exciting.”

"We are delighted to share this great news. The findings of this study show that through research and innovation, a simple inexpensive treatment can have a profound impact on the lives of children affected by CF and their families," said Dr. Peter Liu, Scientific Director of CIHR's Institute of Circulatory and Respiratory Health.

The study was funded by the Canadian Cystic Fibrosis Foundation and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research.

About CF and the Canadian Cystic Fibrosis Foundation

Cystic fibrosis, which affects the lungs and the digestive system, is the most common, fatal, genetic disease affecting Canadian children and young adults. In the digestive tract, CF blocks the absorption of adequate nutrients from food. In the lungs, the effects of the disease are most devastating; and with time, respiratory problems become increasingly severe. Ultimately, most CF deaths are due to lung disease.

The Canadian Cystic Fibrosis Foundation is a Canada-wide health charity, with 50 volunteer chapters, that funds CF research and care. In 2007, the Foundation is supporting more than 50 research projects, which are exploring all aspects of the CF puzzle; from investigating new methods of fighting infection and inflammation in the lungs, to finding new therapies that target the basic defect at a cellular level.

About The Montreal Children’s Hospital

The Montreal Children’s Hospital is the pediatric teaching hospital of the McGill University Health Centre. This institution is a leader in the care and treatment of sick infants, children, and adolescents from across Quebec. The Montreal Children’s Hospital provides a high level and broad scope of health care services, and provides ultra specialized care in many fields including: cardiology and cardiac surgery; neurology and neurosurgery, traumatology; genetic research; psychiatry and child development and musculoskeletal conditions, including orthopedics and rheumatology. Fully bilingual and multicultural, the institution respectfully serves an increasingly diverse community in more than 50 languages.

About the Canadian Institute of Health Research
The Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) is the Government of Canada's agency for health research. CIHR's mission is to create new scientific knowledge and to catalyze its translation into improved health, more effective health services and products, and a strengthened Canadian health-care system. Composed of 13 Institutes, CIHR provides leadership and support to more than 11,000 health researchers and trainees across Canada.

For more information, please contact:

Sagal Ali
Media Relations Officer
Canadian Cystic Fibrosis Foundation
416-485-9149 ext. 290
sali@cysticfibrosis.ca
www.cysticfibrosis.ca
Isabelle Kling
Communications Coordinator (research)
MUHC Public Relations and Communications
(514) 934-1934 #36419
isabelle.kling@muhc.mcgill.ca

Isabelle Kling | Montreal Children’s Hospital
Further information:
http://www.cysticfibrosis.ca
http://www.muhc.mcgill.ca

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