Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Plastic limb splint could provide instant treatment for broken bones

20.03.2007
Extreme sports fans could soon have instant medical treatment for broken limbs that occur in remote locations, following the design of a unique, versatile portable plastic splint, which has won an international design award.

The pioneering First Aid Splint is designed to protect and aid the recovery of damaged bones when the patient is in isolated conditions that are difficult to reach by medical teams and should provide aid to the 45,000 victims of snow sport injuries which occur every year.

The splint applies rigidness and heat quickly to the limb via a special gel created by a chemically reactive metal strip and saturated sodium acetate solution. It was devised as part of an international collaboration between Sheffield Hallam University and the Institut Superieur de Plasturgie d'Alencon (ISPA), France, to explore the lightweight, pliable properties of plastic.

MA Industrial Design students at Sheffield Hallam University, Ching-Sui Kao, from Taiwan and Geremi Durand, from St Ettiene, France, joined engineering student Maxime Ducloux from the ISPA plastic centre of excellence to design the First Aid Splint, which incorporates essential medical treatment with convenience.

The innovative splint was conceived as part of a Design and Innovation in Plasturgy competition to design an object where the main element in plastic. The only UK representatives, Sheffield Hallam University, scooped two of four prizes in the February biannual competition, including the Jury's Grand prize for the First Aid Splint, beating over forty submissions.

Paul Chamberlain, professor of design at Sheffield Hallam University said: "Plastic has surprising uses that are not currently being explored and this competition is a great way to start exploring those possibilities.

"It's a great honour that the innovation and quality of design from our students has allowed them to walk away with half of the available prizes in an international competition. This acclaim is great news for their future careers and employability.

"The experience of working in overseas partnerships has also been invaluable in increasing their skills in team work, international communication, distance working and appreciating cultural differences."

Six teams of two Sheffield Hallam University students, and one ISPA, also addressed the social stigma of mobility aids for users and ways to increase their lifestyle appeal. Winning the category of Plastic on Us, a trophy and E5,000, the team exploited new materials to provide new features and forms for walking aids in the form of O'Leg. Students Jonathan Grant, from Cambridge and Faustine Le Berre from Annecy, France have created a fashionable, adjustable and lightweight support to appeal to sports enthusiasts and a growing aging population.

Two other competition categories, sponsored by the French Plastic Industry, included Plastic in the Home and Plastic Around Us.

The innovative designs are currently available for viewing in Alencon in France, and although in its initial stage, projects are seeking funding and development opportunities.

Lorna Branton | alfa
Further information:
http://www.shu.ac.uk

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Nanoparticles as a Solution against Antibiotic Resistance?
15.12.2017 | Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena

nachricht Plasmonic biosensors enable development of new easy-to-use health tests
14.12.2017 | Aalto University

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: First-of-its-kind chemical oscillator offers new level of molecular control

DNA molecules that follow specific instructions could offer more precise molecular control of synthetic chemical systems, a discovery that opens the door for engineers to create molecular machines with new and complex behaviors.

Researchers have created chemical amplifiers and a chemical oscillator using a systematic method that has the potential to embed sophisticated circuit...

Im Focus: Long-lived storage of a photonic qubit for worldwide teleportation

MPQ scientists achieve long storage times for photonic quantum bits which break the lower bound for direct teleportation in a global quantum network.

Concerning the development of quantum memories for the realization of global quantum networks, scientists of the Quantum Dynamics Division led by Professor...

Im Focus: Electromagnetic water cloak eliminates drag and wake

Detailed calculations show water cloaks are feasible with today's technology

Researchers have developed a water cloaking concept based on electromagnetic forces that could eliminate an object's wake, greatly reducing its drag while...

Im Focus: Scientists channel graphene to understand filtration and ion transport into cells

Tiny pores at a cell's entryway act as miniature bouncers, letting in some electrically charged atoms--ions--but blocking others. Operating as exquisitely sensitive filters, these "ion channels" play a critical role in biological functions such as muscle contraction and the firing of brain cells.

To rapidly transport the right ions through the cell membrane, the tiny channels rely on a complex interplay between the ions and surrounding molecules,...

Im Focus: Towards data storage at the single molecule level

The miniaturization of the current technology of storage media is hindered by fundamental limits of quantum mechanics. A new approach consists in using so-called spin-crossover molecules as the smallest possible storage unit. Similar to normal hard drives, these special molecules can save information via their magnetic state. A research team from Kiel University has now managed to successfully place a new class of spin-crossover molecules onto a surface and to improve the molecule’s storage capacity. The storage density of conventional hard drives could therefore theoretically be increased by more than one hundred fold. The study has been published in the scientific journal Nano Letters.

Over the past few years, the building blocks of storage media have gotten ever smaller. But further miniaturization of the current technology is hindered by...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

See, understand and experience the work of the future

11.12.2017 | Event News

Innovative strategies to tackle parasitic worms

08.12.2017 | Event News

AKL’18: The opportunities and challenges of digitalization in the laser industry

07.12.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Engineers program tiny robots to move, think like insects

15.12.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

One in 5 materials chemistry papers may be wrong, study suggests

15.12.2017 | Materials Sciences

New antbird species discovered in Peru by LSU ornithologists

15.12.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>